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VOL 108 NO. 18 




ANB757 12/28/94 
M1T10CH TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 
757 WIN STREET 

tat'ibth 




©1994- A Schroeder Publication 



ANTIOCH MAY 6, 1994 




COMMUNITY 



Art 




Students' talents 

revealed. 

R4GEA4 



COUNTY 



Green politics 

Political action group 
pleasedwith election 
results, R4CE Bl 

■ 



LAKELIFE 



Mission 

^Area priest travels to 
Alaska PAGE Bll 



Antioch 
hostlae 
Kwon Do. 
RAGE 
C52 




INDEX 

Bu5iNEss ; ::';.... : ....-..Vi. v . '.',•; CI 

ClASsified . ... .......... ... . ; G 12 

CouNiy News...... ....... ... B I 

CrqsswqrcI... •„;...... '.i~ii,;'.B\ fr 

EdiTORJAl/OpiNioN .... .... . . B8 

Gdo^BEQJNNiNqs:.:. Vi , .BIO 
CRE£N>Up:..:....../...... ...B28 

HEAUhwATck.;.,; .,;,.;.. ...B24 

Horoscope;;. .v...7.;..:.;.;B1 8 
LAkEtife .;, . . . : . .^;v . . B 1 1 

LipSERviCE v . .;.;.:.. ... .;;;. B26 

|jmiHE^^|^||||622 
!pbi^i^^gw§v^^|G 10 

:SpOmS;^S;;v:f§;fe : 3C^2; 
WHlRE : TofAJ^duT;SSBJ^: 



CH1INOS PRESS 

A5SOCIA-I ION 

Swvim nevqafmi Mot IMS 




1994 Award Winner 



CAUSE encouraged 



fftfoij Jfeg^J^NS-80 PAGES 



50 CENTS 



with state 




ALEC JUNGE 



Staff Reporter 

A citizen-based group is 
encouraged in its attempt to stop 
Commonwealth Edison from 
constructing a 138,000-vOlt 
transmission line from Round 
Lake Beach to Antioch. 

Testimony has concluded on 
Edison's request for the 
transmission line to a new 
electrical transmission facility in 
Antioch on Rte. 83. Jim Pierce, 
spokesman for Citizens Against 
Unsafe Electricity (CAUSE) said . 
he feels they can make the case 



Edison doesn't need an 138,000- 
volt line when a smaller 12,000- 
volt line along existing lines can 
provide for growth and cost less. 

"We were pleased to get 
Commonwealth Edison to admit 
that they could build a 
transmission substation at 
Rollins Road, Rte. 83, and 
Haincsville Road," Pierce said. 
"In a similar service upgrade 
Edison did in Lindcnhurst, there 
was a 12,000-volt line from a 
transmission distribution center 
on Hunt Club Road in Gurnec 
See CAUSE page A9 



Edison testifies for 
overhead power lines 



MARY FOLEY 
Staff Reporter 

• The testimony, regarding the 
need for 138-kiIovolt overhead 
lines for Antioch and Lake Villa 
was completed last week. 
Commonwealth Edison, 

representatives feel that they 
have successfully stated their, 
case. Written briefs must now be 
submitted by Edison and 
Citizens Against Unsafe 
Electricity (CAUSE) by June 10 to 
the Illinois Commerce 
Commission. 

"We feel confident we were 
able to show there is a need," 
said Edison representative Joe 



Trcxler. "We are confident that 
we demonstrated that both DSM 
(Demand Side Management) and 
low wattage will not address the 
problems." 

Edison and CAUSE have been 
battling for a long time now 
about whether or not the 138- 
kilovolt lines are needed. Gdison 
believes the new lines are needed 
to meet area demand. CAUSE 
argues that by using DSM, which 
is comprised of a number of 
programs encouraging energy 
efficiency, and a. low voltage 
system can handle the power 
loads. 
See EDISON page A9 




Crowning achievement 

Newly crowned prom king Brian Stech and queen Elly 
WallJn,. share their coronation danceTat Grayslake 
IGpmrfiunlty High School's prom, held at MIdlane. Country 
Club In Wadswprth: ■ Students from throughout Lake County 
qrejprepqrjng for their special prom nights during the 
month of May. —Photo by Bill Dermocry Jr. 



Village opts to rezone Victorian neighborhood 



MARY FOLEY __ 

Staff Reporter 

The Village Board of 
Antioch made the difficult 
decision Monday night to 
rezone the north side of Ida 
Street from R-5 to R-3. The , 
decision was difficult because, 
despite a majority of residents 
requesting the change, in order 
to avoid spot zoning, two 
properties were rezoncd 
against the owners' wishes. 

The rezoning encompassed 
12 properties from 257 to 327 



Ida. Eight of the homeowners 
had petitioned the board for the 
change after a developer had 
proposed to build a multi-family 
dwelling on one of the lots. At 
that time, many of the 
homeowners discovered, for the 
first time, that all of the property 
had been zoned for multi-family 
dwellings, 

What started the whole issue 
was when the Village of Antioch 
denied a variance in March to 
Todd Stolark and Tom 
VanderMeer to split in half the 



property located on 307 Ida 
Street in Antioch. The men 
, offered several proposals for the 
property which is zoned R-5, 
multi-family. 

According to Robert Silhan, 
village planner, the property, as it 
sits, was large enough to support 
a four unit structure. The 
dimensions of the property are 
90 feet by 184 feet. At this time, 
there is an existing building on 
the property which was built in 
the '20s. 

Ida Street residents were 



unhappy with VariderM.eer's 
proposal; to build a multi- 
dwelling building on the 
premises. Many discovered, for 
the first time, the entire area has 
been zoned multi-family. The 
: group of mostly seniors, worried 
about the conversion of older, 
larger Victorian homes into 
multi-family dwellings. 

"The street is . very 
vulnerable," said Lorraine Toton 
at the March meeting. "1 think 
we need to think about the 
See ZONING page A9 



Antioch parks director announces resignation 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter ' 

Robin "Carol" Todd has 
submitted her resignation from 
her post as the director of parks 
and recreation. The Antioch 
Village Board accepted the 
resignation, Monday night. 

According to the resignation 
letter, Todd has been accepted to 
the graduate school program at 
Eastern Illinois University. Her 
resignation, effective May 27, 
1994, will allow her to pursue her 
education full-time* 

"She has done a fine job," 
said Trustee Dorothy Larson. "It 
will be hard to replace her." 

Todd has been with the 



Village of Antioch for three years. 
She was instrumental in the 
production of the village 
newsletter and instituted many 
park programs. 

"The three years 1 've spent in 
Antioch have been enjoyable 
ones," Todd said in her letter of 
resignation. "I appreciate. the 
opportunity I was given to work 
for the Village of Antioch. I 
would like to extend my best 
wishes to you and all of the 
village employees." 

Todd had planned to return 
for Her advanced degree from 
the time she received her 
bachelor's degree from the 
University of Illinois, While she 



is sad to leave the friends she 
has made in Antioch, Todd is 
excited about going back to 
school and moving back near 
her family in Flora, III. - : 

"I am excited to go back to 
school, but also sorry to leave 
here," said Todd. "1 am reaily 
looking forward to being near my 
family. My whole family, including 
grandparents, are in Flora." 

Cheryl Becker has been 
named acting park director. 
Becker has a degree in recreation 
and is a certified life guard. She 
will begin work on May 15 and 
will work with Todd for two 
weeks in order to be trained. Her 
salary was set at $10 a hour. 



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May 6, 1 994 UeIancI Newspapers COMMUNITY 




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Who will be the next? 

Sophomore Jennifer Kent looks over a pageant questionnaire at Antloch High School as Miss 
Antloch Kelly Sullivan and Carol Todd; director of parks, look on.— Photo by Gone Gabry 



Major work to be done at parks 



MARY FOLEY ■ 

Staff Reporter 

The Antloch Village 
Commissioner of Streets, Joe 
Huber, has submitted his spring 
project list which includes some 
major work to be done at Gage 
Brother's Park. Gage Brother's 
Park includes the Hiram Quttrick 
Saw Mill. 

Besides planning to repair the 
deck and split rail fence, Huber 
plans to reshape and rip-rap the 
mill pond. This work is expected 

to begin in the early summer. 

r r '-■ > i 



Other park work includes clay 
for the. infield at Williams Park, 
extending the concrete to the cast 
side of the pavilion in Centennial 
Park to allow for more picnic 
tables, and to install the poles for 
the tennis courts in Jensen Park 
that were vandalized. The yct-to- 
be-named park near Heron 
Harbor will also get a gate for the 
entrance. 

Huber also submitted the 
spring projects for village streets 
and roads. He hopes to grade the .v 



shoulders on Trevor Road, North 
Avenue, Tiffany Road, Nelson 
Road, Anita, McMillcn, and in 
• Oak Wood Knolls. The final leg of 
the storm sewer on Anita Street is 
also slated to be installed this 
spring. 

Street sweeping is on the pro- 
ject list as well as the repair of the 
pot holes and water main digs. 
White and Bowles Road will also 
be graded and graveled. Sidewalk 
repair will begin throughout the 
village. ■■ ■ , 



Fire department begins fund raiser 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter . 

The Antioch Firefighters 
Association has begun to send 
letters out to residents of the 
Antioch Fire Prevention District 
for its annual fund raiser. The 
Firefighter's Dance, which will be 
held on Saturday, June 25, is the 
principal fund raising event for 
the association. , ' 



Lakeland < usps ; 

i^Tapeni 027-080) 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1886 

OHico of Publication: 30 South Whitrwy St., 
Qrayslaks. IL 60030. Phone (706)223-8161 . 



Published vmMy, Moond class postage paid at 
Gray slake. IL 60030. 

Mail Subscription Rates: $19.50 Per Year fay Mail 
paid in advance In -Lake, Cook, Kenosha and 
McHenry Counties; elsewhere $27.00 Per Year 
by Mai paid In advance. 

Postmaster Send address changes to Antioch 
News-Reporter, 30 South Whitney Street, P.O. 
Box 268, Qrayslake, Illinois 6003a 

(708)223-8161 

Gurnet Press 

Round Lake News 

Wauconda Leader 

LfcflrtyvSte News 

UndenhurstNews 

Warren-Newport Press 



Antioch News-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Lake Vita Record 
Mundele'in News 

Graysla» Tines 
Fox Lake Press 



The money raised by the 
event in the past, along with allo- 
cated tax dollars, was used to 
purchase materials for fire pre- 
vention education for the com- 
munity. Last year, over 5000 
school children were brought to 
the Antioch Tire station to learn 
about fire prevention. 

Younger students learned 
about 911, checking smoke 
detectors, escape routes in the 
home, and fire-fighting gear. 
Older students were able to 
watch an actual fire call using a 
mock house and real fire. Best of 
all, this education has paid off 
handsomely. 

Children arc not the only ones 
that benefitted from the commu- 
nity education programs. The 
department also held special 
classes geared towards senior cit- 



izens, civic organizations, and the 
general public 

The department's Fire Safety 
House was on display during the 
Taste of Antioch to show how to 
get out of the home safely during 
afire. 

All this education has certain- 
ly paid off in Lake County. For 
the first time in 10 years there 
were no fire fatalities in the entire 
county in 1993. 

Included in the letter sent to 
residents arc tickets for the dance 
for only $1 each. 

The department hopes that 
everyone will be able to donate 
something so that they can con- 
tinue the fine fire prevention pro- 
grams available. Residents inter- 
ested in additional tickets can call 
395-5511 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. 



Staff Reporter 

At this time, none of the 
Antioch Community High School 
bus drivers have accepted jobs 
with' Laidlaw, the contractor 
selected by the school board to 
provide transportation for the 
high school for the next three 
years. Low pay and driving dis- 
tance have been cited as the rea- 
sons for failure of the drivers to 
consider. the jobs. 

"We can't afford to work for 
them," said driver Marge Soulc. 
"After we pay for gasoline and 
taxes, we would have no money 
left." 

"The bottom line is the pay- 
check," explained Diane Rudis. 
"Laidlaw, as well as the other 
companies, pay what we got in 
the 70s. That is why their 
turnover is over 50 percent UPS 
(United Parcel Service) drivers get 
over $20 an hour, and they just 
drive packages. Where arc we 
putting our priorities?" 

The drivers say that most of 
the Antioch school bus drivers 
would have to drive 100 miles a 
day just to get to and from work. . 
Although the. bus company will 
allow the drivers to park the buses 
in their homes, they believe that 
most of their residential neigh- 
borhoods would not atlow the 
buses to be parked in private dri- 
veways. 

Currently, only two drivers 
have found other employment. 
Laidlaw was out at the school 
.during the spring break to talk to 
drivers. According to Cathy 
Ursine, none of the drivers 
attended. 

"There are several reasons 
why we arc not interested. First, 
the driving time to and from work 
would be 40 minutes each way," 
said Ursine. "We would get 40 to 



50 percent less pay, no sick days 
or holidays,- 100 percent pay-in 
for their group insurance and an 
in-housc union costing $8 a 
month in dues." 

The drivers continue to 
express bafflement at the school 
board's decision to contract out 
the transportation services. 
"They didn't even come to us," 
said Rudis. "That is what really 
gets to us. Sometimes the cheap- 
est isn't the best . . I have had 
three jobs in my life, bus driving, 
bus driving, and bus driving." 

"We had gotten over 600 sig- 
natures on our petition in only six 
days," said Ursine. "A hundred 
signatures a day. If we had 
thought of it sooner, imagine how 
many signatures we would have 
gotten. We voted these people in 
and they are not listening." 

The drivers express anger that 
the board did not wait to sec how 
effective last year's cuts worked . 
before deciding to contract out 
They also feel that not enough 
research was done before select- 
ing the contracting company. 

Driver Nancy ■ Schocn 
expressed her frustration with the 
entire situation. "The hell with 
the area, we arc moving," she 
joked. "I'm not going to pay the 
taxes we're going to pay in the 
years to come." 

In a more serious tone, 
Schocn discussed her plans after 
June. "We have moved our retire- 
ment a little earlier," said Schocn. 

All the drivers agreed that the 
last day of school will be the hard- 
est time of all. They arc dreading 
saying good bye to the students 
they have become so fond of. 

"The hardest will be the last 
day of school," said Schocn, very 
emotionally. "... saying good- 
bye to the kids. . ;" ' 



BrjeFs 



Pine Hill path issue settled 



MARY FOLEY 



Vernon His News 
M.R SCHROEDER 

Founder-1904-1986 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publisher ^President 

WILUAMM. SCHROEDER 

General Manager 

SHARON ZASACHL 

Operations Manager 

JLLDePASQUALE BOB SCHROEDER 

JO DAYS . ANN M ROBERTS 

RHONDA VmZAHT EUttBETH EBERT 



Staff Reporter 

The Pine Hill Lakes walking path issue has finally been settled. 
Pursuant to numerous meetings with the homeowners association as 
well as the developer, the Antioch Village Board approved the amend-. 
ment to change the walking path plan. 

A public hearing was held on April 28 regarding the walking path. At 
that time the Planning and Zoning Board voted to accept the amend- 
ment to the plan. 

"The walking path originally put in did not work very well," said 
Village Planner Robert Silhan. "It has been revised and rc-rcyiscd sev- 
eral times. 

"United and the homeowners association have met several times," 
Silhan continued. "It is my understanding that the homeowner associ- 
ation is in agreement" 

Attorney Kenneth Clark was instructed by the board to draw up an 
ordinance revising the walking path plan. The path will now go along 
the east shoreline of the northerly pond. 

Along with the new walking path plan, some work will be done on 
the north pond. The work will include pond cleaning and silt removal. 



Support group starting 

- A new bible-based support group wUI begin shortly to help 
those struggling with addictive behavior through a "12-stcp" 
program. This is a coed program and all ages are invited. 
Anonymity is guaranteed. The group will meet in the annex 
building of the Antioch Evangelical Free Church on Fridays at 7 
p.m. If you are interested or have any questions, call George at 
(708) 395-8529 

Dog walking reminder 

The Village of Antioch would like to remind residents of 
ordinance 91.008, which requires the owners of dogs and other 
domestic animals to carry a receptacle to place any animal 
droppings your pet may leave behind. If your animal is caught 
leaving a mess behind, you may receive a non-traffic ticket and 
your animal could be impounded. 

Hydrant flushing begins 

A notice to residents that hydrant flushing has begun in the 
Village of Antloch. Flushing will occur between the hours of 8 
a.m- and 4 p.m. and notices will be posted in the areas effected. 

Township to meet 

Antioch Township Board wUI meet next Thursday, May 12, 
at 7:30 p.m. The meetings arc held at the township office, 99 
Route 173 in Antioch and all arc welcome. 

Pageant applications due 

Applications for Miss and Little Miss Antioch arc due Friday, 
May 13 at 5 p.m. at the Antioch Village Hall. There is no fee to 
enter and for more information call 395-2160. 

Celebrate Water Week 

May 2 through May 8 has been proclaimed "Drinking Water 
Week." 



-TflllW-l 



..*-—t '.., 




!1 COMMUNITY UkdANtl Newspapers Max 6, 1994 



School BmEfs— 

Summer school registration 

Antloch Community High School has begun Its summer 
school registration for students in District 117. There will be 
two sessions offered, June 13 through July 6, and tlic second, 
July 7 through July 29. Both sessions will be from a.m. to 12:20 
p.m.- There will also be several seven-week courses available 
which will run from June 13 through July 29 from 8 a.m. to 10 
a.m. Written approval from the student's counselor Is required 
before enrollment. Registration forms arc available at the ACHS 
Guidance Officcund at all elementary schools that feed into 
Antloch Community High School. Graduating eighth-graders 
should sec counselors at their own school. Registration ends 
May 27 for the first session and July 1 for the second. 
For more information call 395-1421. 

Parental reminder 

Antioch District 34 has completed its calendar and school is 
• scheduled to end June 7. For the more forward thinking, school 
is scheduled to reopen on Wednesday, Aug. 31. Christmas 
vacation will begin Dec. 17 through Jan. 1, and spring vacation 
for 1995 will be March 27 through March 31. 

Oakland's music program 

On May 5 at 7 p.m., third-grade students of Oakland School 
will present a musical program at the school. Children should . 
be at the school at 6:45 and the public is invited to attend. 

Assistant principal selection 

Antioch Upper Grade School is in the process of searching 
for an assistant principal. During the month of May, applicants 
will be interviewed. The selection process is expected to be 
complete June 1. 

Spring flower sale 

Antioch Elementary School will be sponsoring a Spring 
Flower Sale on Saturday, May 7 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Bedding 
plants as well as hanging plants will be for sale. The sale will 
take place at the school on 817 Main Street. Purchase Mother's 
Day gifts and help support the school at the same time. The 
profits from the sale will go towards the computer lab. 

Kindergarten registration 

Emmons School District 33 will be holding its kindergarten 
registration and orientation for the 1994-1995 school year on 
May 10 at 7 p.m. at the school. If your child will be five years 
old before September 1, 1994 he or she is eligible to enter 
kindergarten. Children arc invited to attend the registration 
and orientation with their parents. A copy of the child's birth 
certificate is required. Registration forms will be supplied and 
the curriculum will be discussed. For more information call 
the school at 395-1 105. 



Antioch High gets new sign 



Scquoit Pride is responsible 
for the new sign at Antioch 
Community High School. The 
Pride is the parent booster orga- 
nization that supports all areas of 
the high school. 

The group, which meets on 
the first Monday of every month 
at 7:30 at the high school com- 
mons, raised, along with the 
alumni of the classes of 1992 and 
1993, $8,000 to have the sign 
made and installed. The sign was 
designed by Distinctive Signs of 
Antioch. ^. 



The sign features the school 
colors of cardinal-red and gray, 
and includes' a lighted informa- 
tion board. The sign will provide 
information about the various 
school activities. " 

"The height of the sign was 
determined by village ordi- 
nance," said Ed Koziorowski, 
chairman of the Scquoit Pride 
Sign Committee. 

For more information call 
Steve Hacnchen, president, at 
356-8813. 




I 



CLC honors 

The College of Lake County recognized 60 honors students 
for their academic excellence and accomplishments at the 
annual Honors Convocation on Friday, April 22. Honors stu- 
dents have attained a grade point average of at least 3.75 
(out of 4.0) after completing 45 credit hours. Among the stu- 
dents recognized are, .from left, Sally Ann'Rodgers of 
Antloch, Sharon Lemeln-Lear and Linda Harpke of 
Llndenhurst. 




% 



Real Campbell's soup kids 

Jason Krause, of Marie Sheldon's fourth-grade class at W.C. Petty Elementary School was the 
winner of the school-wide effort to bring In soup labels to exchange for school equipment. The 
drive was sponsored by the school's PTO. Cindy Dzlkl, PTO secretary, Marie Sheldon, Principal 
Paul Hala and Lori Stahi, PTO president. Joined the fourth-grade class to celebrate. The labels 
were used to purchase a VCR for the school.— Photo by Gene Gabry 



'Very Special Art Show,' a smash 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

The "Very Special Art Show," 
held last weekend, was a smash- 
ing success. The artistic talents of 
students from the Antioch 
Community High School, 
Antioch Upper Grade School, 
Lake Villa Intermediate, and 
Milburn were very evident at the 
show, which was held at the Lake 
Region Historical Society. 

Will O'Donnell, a senior at 
Antioch Community High 
School, stole the show with his oil 
painting entitled, "Portrait of My 
Father." O'Donnell not only took 
first place, but also won the visi- 
tor's choice award. For his first 
place effort, O'Donnell received 
$50 and $40 for the visitor's 
choice award. 

"It , was wonderful," said 
Shirley Jensen of the Antioch 



Woman's Club, sponsors of the 
show. "This boy is going to go 
far." 

Second place went to Justin 
Runyard, also of Antioch 
Community High School. His air- 
brushed work, "Silhouette," gar- 
nered Runyard a $35 prize. 

Third prize, of $30, went to Jill 
Blass of Lake Villa Intermediate. 
Her work, "Better where it is 
Wetter," was a construction 
paper work of fish In water. 
Fourth place went to, Kristin 
Lynch from Antioch Upper Grade 
-School for her ceramic piece, 
"Rose Bowl." 

Except for the visitor's choice 
award, the art work was judged 
by Bob Lossmann and Antioch 
Woman's Club Art Chairperson 
Bernadettc Bay. Lossmann is 
from the College of Lake County's 



Art Department. 

A number of students 
received honorable mention 
awards of $10. From Antioch 
Community High School Dan 
Bctke, Chcrie Camon, Harry 
Ccamont, Nicole Ccrk, Rebecca 
Christophcrsen, Linda DcSalvo, 
Bridget Jensen, Lisa Rosemann, 
and Jeff Weber, all received hon- 
orable mentions. 

From Antioch Upper Grade 
School, Amy Eng, Corey Fauser, 
and Aaron (Caster won honorable 
mentions. Lake Villa 

Intermediate honorable mention 
winners include Crystal Akins, 
Matt Harvala, Alex. Newton, and 
Eric Ply. From Milburn, Jim 
Gramhofcr, Brian Hagy, 
Samantha Hahn, and Josh 
Harpke were all honorable men- 
tion winners. 




•9 




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M*y6, 1994 LaIceIancI Newspapers COMMUNITY 






Persons charged with a crime are Innocent untfl proven 
guilty In a court of law. 

ANTIOCH 

Report filed on altercation 

While there were no arrests, a resident filed a complaint with 
the Antioch Police Department on May 1, about an altercation at 
a gas station. The complainant told police that she was threat- 
ened by the driver of a car. Police spoke with the driver who told 
police that a large group of juveniles refused to allow him to 
drive out of a gas station. No arrests were made. 

Jacket stolen at restaurant 

A black leather jacket was reported stolen from the back of a 
chair in the Waterfall's Restaurant Lounge on May 1. The jacket 
was valued at under $300. 



i 



Bank light vandalized 

On April 28, Antioch Police investigated criminal damage to 
property at an area bank. Apparently, a flood light located on the 
front lawn by the cash station was damaged. The damage was 
estimated to be $180. Extra watches have been posted. 



Woman 



for DDI 



Anna Marie Sederstrom, of Lake Villa, was arrested for DUI 
on April 29 at 1:50 am. Sederstrom was observed disregarding 
the stop sign at Tiffany Street and Route 173. Sederstrom was 
released on bond. 

Driving while license suspended 

Joel B. BcIIucci, age 27, of Antioch was arrested for driving on 
a suspended license on April 29. BeUucci was stopped when • 
observed driving over the fog line and having no registration 
sticker on his car. He was also ticketed for improper lane usage, 
expired registration, and released on bond. 

Woman fails to pay for items 

Shcrce L Scheskie, age 43, of Antioch was arrested after she 
was observed placing items into her purse and shopping cart,- but 
only paying for the items in the cart. Found in her purse were 
make-up and personal hygiene products valued at $42.66. 
Scheskie was released on recognizance bond and given a June 
court date. 

Deceptive practices arrest 

" il " Brian F. Pnimln/agc^i, of XhtiochTwas arrested after he 
attempted to purchase items and receive cash at the Piggly 
Wiggiy Food Store paying by check on April 28.. According to the 
report, the account had been closed and Philbin had presented a 
number of checks drawn from the same account in the past. The 
amount of loss was $460. 

Police assist LCSO 

The Antioch Police Department assisted the Lake County 
Sheriffs Department in breaking up a fight that occurred at the 
Waterfalls Restaurant on May 1. Michael Smith age 21, Blain 
Smith, age 20, and Dennis Smith, age 23, of Lake Villa were ail 
arrested and transferred to Lake County Jail. 

Warrant arrest after stop 

Demetrius L Gordon, age 18, of Waukegan, was arrested for 
speeding and not having his driver's license on his person on 
April 26, after he was observed traveling 40 mph in a posted 
school zone. At the time, it was discovered that there were sever- 
al warrants issued for Gordon and he was transported to Lake 
County Jail after receiving his tickets. 



Dispatcher recognized for 
service during rail fires 



MARY FOLEY ' 

Staff Reporter 

Kcrri Carbcrry, an Antioch 
dispatcher, was recognized for 
the professional manner she dis- 
played during the railroad right- 
of-way fires on April 23. A frozen 
train wheel showered an area 
between Kenosha, Wis. and 
Fairfield Road in Lake Villa with 
sparks causing a number of small 
fires, 

"The conditions were 
extremely busy as other calls 
were going on at the same time," 
said Deputy Chief Dennis Volling 
in a letter to the Antioch Village 



COURAGE increasing its presence 



AlECJUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

COURAGE anti-gang organi- 
zation is continuing its planning 
for its major fund-raiser, "Rock 



the local area 

"We need to keep up the 
awareness of who we are and 
what we offer and what our pur- 
pose is," sai(|«Unda Bcrgin, vice 
and Rollathon", being more president of COURAGE. We want 
active in parades and finding , to make sure we have exposure In 
suitable meeting places to Antioch, Grayslake, Lindenhurst 



accommodate the group's size. 

Rock and Rollathon is a 24 
hours of rocking and roller blad- 
ing from 4 p.m. June 3 to June 4 at 
4 p.m. The group is looking for 
support from individuals and 
businesses in Antioch, Grayslake, 
Lake Villa and Lindenhurst 

Among the significant issues 
addressed by the board Is select- 
ing Donna Stuckcrt of Lake Villa 
District Library as the parade 
contact person. She will be con- 
tacting parade coordinators in 



Need a New Set of Wheels! 

Motor on to the Transportation Section of this 

Week's Classifieds 



and Lake Villa, the participating 
villages." 

COURAGE stands for 
Community Outreach Uniting 
Residents Against Gang 
Environment The group has res- 
idents from the four communi- 
ties and is working to reduce and 
prevent gang activity in the area. 

The organization is sponsor- 
ing a logo contest for sixth- 
graders to high school seniors. 
The winner of. the contest will be 
announced at the Rock and 



Rollathon and will receive a $25 
gift certificate. 

Also the group. is considering 
changing times and locations for 
the meetings. For the last few 
months, the meetings have been 
held in the conference room in 
the Lindenhurst Village Hall. 
Bcrgin said the meeting space 
has room for 30 people and is get- 
ting crowded. COURAGE is look- 
ing for a room which can accom- 
modate 50 or more people. 

COURAGE is considering 
moving the locations. Also the 
day might be switched to 
Wednesdays to accommodate 
schedules. 

The next meeting is sched-* 
ulcd for May 26 at Lindenhurst 
Village Hall. For more informa- 
tion call Bcrgin at 356-6788. 



Waterway plans, sheriff patrol cutbacks 



TINA L. SWIECH 



Staff Reporter 

Because of previous reports 
of boater-harassment, and due to 
the lack of frivolous funds, the 
Chain O' Lakes Fox River 
Waterway Agency is leaning 
towards cutting back on sheriffs 
patrols. 

The salaries for both the 
McHcnry and Lake county sher- 
iffs water patrol units have been 
the subject of discussion among 
board members,, and the new 
proposal was made after the last 
Agency meeting. 

One of the options was to 
actually cut the $40,000 a year 
contract for Lake and $30,000 for 
McHenry altogether. 

However the board talked 
about it further and feels a need 
for^thcj sheriffs power .when it, 
comes to 'enforcing the night- 
time speed limit of 25 m.p.h.; the 
pollution ordinance; and the no- 
wake restricted areas of the Chain 
and river. 

What the Agency proposed is 



to pay the two county sheriffs for 
enforcing these areas, but as far 
as the Waterway sticker fee ordi- 
nance goes, the agency will do 
that on its own. 

That's the area where a lot of 
the so-called boater harassment 
comes in. "Some people think 
we're the police. We're not," 
explained Dr. William C. Dam 
who heads the agency. 

The agency would like to sec 
someone with a pleasant yet 
direct manner— perhaps a retired 
police officer or such, explained 



Executive Director Karen Kabbes. 
. The agency simply can't pay' 
the salaries once given to the two 
sheriffs. "We realize it was not an 
inexpensive endeavor," said the 
executive director. 

Proposed was one figure of 
$52,000 a year which the agency 
could afford a little better than 
the previous' combined $70,000. 
Forty-two percent or approxi- 
mately $22,000 would go to 
McHcnry, and fifty-eight percent 
or around $30,0000 is broken 
■ down for Lake County. 



Clubs to sponsor carnival 



Antioch's 885 Civic Club, the 
Sequoit Masonic Lodge 827, and 
the Antioch Chapter Order of the 
Eastern Star clubs will be spon- 
soring a carnival May 4 through 
May 8. The carnival will include 
many rides, games, and refresh- 
ments. Family specials will be 
available Wednesday night from 
6 p.m. to closing, and Saturday 



and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. 
Pay only $10 for unlimited rides 
during these times. 

The money raised from the 
carnival will be used for the 
numerous civic functions these 
groups sponsor. On May 19, the 
885 Civic Gub will hold its annu- 
al picnic for the physically chal- 
lenged.— by MARY FOLEY 



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Board. "Dispatcher Kcrri 
Carbcrry had control the entire 
time." 

Despite the dry conditions, 
and the large number of fires, no 
major damage occurred. It was 
estimated that 100 acres were 
destroyed by the fires. 

The Antioch and Lake Villa 
Fire Departments were joined 
with 26 units, 10 agencies, and 
over 200 fire fighting personnel 
to battle the blazes. Also, the 
fire chief of Round Lake assist- 
ed at command. The fires took 
roughly four hours to be put 
out. 



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COMMUNITY UlcEUNd Newspapers Ma? 6, 19*4 



■ 






. 



Christopolous, Brausam families enjoy Florida reunion 



Closing the gap 

It is always fun visiting with 
old friends and when old friends 
live a thousand miles away, those 
visiting times become even more 
special. Mike, Lorrie, Tiffany and 
Tara Lynn Christopolous moved 
from Antloch to Florida approxi- 
mately seven and one half years 
ago. Although they arc definitely 
enjoying the warmer climate and 
their beautiful new home, they 
have also kept in contact with 
many of their Antioch friends 
through letters, phone conversa- 
tions and very rare and special 
visits. When Ray, Marie, Vivian 
and Kclley Brausam vacationed 
in Florida for spring break, they 
made arrangements to visit with 
the Christopolous clan. 

They enjoyed such activities as 
a day at the Fort Meyer Dog 
Track, a long relaxing walk at 
Barefoot Beach in Bonita Springs 
and a visit to Mike's 
famous/favorite bridge at Sanlbel 
Island to see the alligators and 
dolphins. Some things never 
change and laughter and good 
conversation between friends is 
one of them. Living proof of this 
is the afternoon Lorrie and Marie 
walked over four miles as they 
talked over old times. Lorrie is 
busy working for a landscape 
business and therefore the land- 



scaping surrounding their new Steve Anderson, Lucas Barrett, 
home Is beautifully done. Wolf Scout came in second and 
Michael is busy running his own his brother Kaleb Barrett rcprc- 



busincss as he did back in Illinois. 

Tiffany, now a junior at Florida 
University, is also working in the 
Campus Spirit Store. In turn, 
Mike, Lorrie,' and Tara are walk- 
ing advertisements for the college 
as they proudly wear all of the 
Florida State sweatshirts and T- 
shirts purchased for them by 
Tiffany. Tara Lynn is a high 
school freshman and everyone is 
still extremely proud that she 
graduated at the top of her eighth 
grade class. In between her stud- 
ies, she is presently playing on a 
local volleyball team and enjoy- 
ing every minute of it. 

The time passed quickly and 
everyone parted with hugs and 
kisses as they all made plans to 
meet in New Orleans during the 
month of luly, at which time Bob 
and Darienc Olenick will be join- 
ing them. They naturally send 
their love to everyone back in 
Antioch. In turn, their Antioch 
friends return their good wishes. 

Scouting events 

The Grass Lake School Cub 
Scout Pack No. 80 Pincwood 
Derby was a lot of fun and pro- 
duced many winners. The first 
place winner was Tiger Scout, 




L 



Tree trimming 

Jim Gunn of Wright Tree Service prunes trees on Route 59 that 
have grown to close to Antloch's power lines. A branch touch- 
ing the lines drains electricity and can begin arcing, causing 
television Interference. —Photo by Bill Dormody Jr. 



scnting the Wcbclo Scouts came 
in third. Ryan Thamcrus won the 
Tiger award for "Most Original 



HOMETOWN GOODIES 



UZ 
SCHMEHL 




797'$780 



Derby Car." In the same category, 
Al Lara won it for the Wolf Scouts 
and Brian Ginctt for the Wcbclo 
Scouts. The "Best Car Design" 
awards go to Steven Anderson 
(Tiger); Craig Manlscalco (Wolf) 
and A.I. Tcatcrs (Wcbclo). The 
district derby was held -on April 9 
and Lucas Barrett was the win- 
ner. 

Promotion 

Jeanctte Van Arsdall, daughter 
of Janet and Ed Harrison of Lake 
Villa, was recendy promoted to 
Captain in the United States 
Army. Jeanctte is a registered 
nurse (RN) in the army and is 
now serving at the Fort 
Wainwright base hospital in 
Fairbanks, Ala. Her husband, 
David is retired from the army 
and is now working as a para- 
medic . in Fairbanks. 
Congratulations, Jeanctte. Your 
mom, dad, sister, brother and 
friends back home arc very proud 
of you. 

AUGS 

Mr. Herdliska's math student 
of the month at Antioch Upper 
Grade School was John' Aco'stal 
He had the highest academic 
average of all the math students. 
The student of the month for 
March is Amy Eng who has also 
maintained a high academic 
average. 

The AUGS track team coaches, 
Mr. Marshall, Mrs. Thornton and 
Miss Gast for the girls and Mr. 
Hastings and Mr. Sicckowski for 
the boys are excited about the 
upcoming season. This year's 
qualifying students will be sent to 
the State Track Meet for the 1ESA. 

the AUGS "Green Machine 
Wrcsding Team" wrestled in the 
IKWF State Regionals at 
Carpcntersville Junior High 
School. After six tough rounds of 
wrestling, the Apaches placed 
' twelve wrestlers in the top six and 
scored 134 team points to secure 
second - place. Placing for the 
Apaches were Joe Jordan (fifth), 
Eric Ring (fourth), Joe 
Brandimore (fourth), Bill 



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Werchek (third), Ryan Gamlln 
(third), Luke Haley (third) Jeff 
Uties (third), Justin Triplett (sec- 
ond), Dan Werchek (second), 
Jason Langlcy (second), Adam 



in at 8 pounds, 
Congratulations! 



3 ounces. 



New addition 

On April 13, Sue and Don Koile 



Nilcs (second) and Dave Whitmcr became parents for the second 

(first). time. Kclste Morgan Kolle was 

"The Green Machine" took bom at Lake Forest Hospital and 

part in the second round of the weighed 7 pounds 15 ounces. 

IKWF State Series in Mchenry. Grandpa and grandma, Harry 

After six grueling rounds, the and Sue Lcngvcnls, are very excit- 

Apachcs placed five wrestlers and ed over her birth as is great 

advanced four to the State Finals, grandma, Bculah Racf. Three 

Placing for the Apaches were year old big sister, Karissa Lauren 

Luke Haley (fourth), Jason is very helpful as she assists in the 

Langlcy (third), Jeff Utlcs (sec- care of her new little sister, 

ond), Justin Triplett (second) and Congratulations, everyone. 
Dan Werchek (second). Jason 



Kappa Delta PI 

On April 15, Dcanna Olenick 
of Antioch was installed as a char- 
ter member of Kappa Delta Pi, 
which is an international honor 
society dedicated to scholarship 
and excellence in education. 
Dcanna's parents, Bob and 
Darlene Olenick of Antioch, 
attended an installation recep- 
tion at the Glen Rowan House at 
Lake Forest College. 

Congratulations, Dcanna, and 
keep up the great work. 

Happy birthday 

With the month of. May six 
days underway, it is time for 



Langlcy, Jeff Udcs, Justin Triplett 
and Dan Werchek had the honor 
of representing the Apaches in 
the State Finals in Bloomington. 
The state scries was. the largest 
ever hosted. Over 700 schools 
and 9,000 wrestlers participated 
in the series. After four exciting 
rounds of wrestling, Jeff Utlcs 
wrestled back to take an impres- 
sive sixth place in the state. Jeff 
becomes only the third Apache to 
place in the state finals since 
1981, Congratulations everyone 
and congratulations Jeff. We are 
.all proud of you. 

Beautiful beginning 

Recently, little Kirsten 
Rognstad come into Camp another monthly birthday list. 
Crayon bearing a very special However, I first remind all of my 
wedding invitation. Her dad, readers that this Sunday, May 8, 
Mark Rognstad and his fiancd, is Mother's Day. Remember, 
Jacquclyn Giclow, will be getting moms are easy to make happy, 
married on luly 23, thus uniting While gifts arc always nice, asim- 
two families. The Gielows consist pic "Mom, I love you." is usually 
of Jacquclyn and her daughter all that is needed to put a smile 
Michelle. The Rognstads consist on dear old mom's face and a 
of Mark and his three daughters, song in her heart. 
Nicole, Kcrri and Kirsten. The Happy May, birthday, to- 
wedding invitation was beautiful- Alyssa Anderson, Dennis Bcrgl, 
ly worded with the four children Jaonnc Bergl, Kenneth Bcrgl, 
being the ones inviting everyone Kaitlyn Bics, Kclley Brausam 
to "Share their destiny to live, (sweet sixteen), Jeremiah Buss, 
love and begin each new day Kcllic Davis, Tommy Davis, 
together, beginning with the joy Robert Edelrnan, Kelly Forst, Ben 
of their marriage." Jacquclyn, Friel, Don Grab, Jenny Hart, Paul 
Mark,- Michelle, Nicole, Kcrri and Jucrgens, Dale Kitto, Dayna 
Kirsten, please know there arc Kluth, Brigettc Leonard, Frank 
many people who wish you suit- Nava (hope your eye is mending 
shine and happiness on the wed- properly), Lisa Olscn, Jcffic 
ding day and for the many, many Pierce, Lisa Priiicr, Garik 
years ahead of you as a very spc- Niffcncgger, Kcrri Rognstad, Russ 
cial family united in love, snaring Schallcr, Luigi Sen men!, Jenny 



and caring. 

Baby makes three 

Maria and Adam Perry arc very 
excited over the birth of their first 
child. Little Callie Christine was 



Schrciber (how's the new. little 
sister doing?), Ryan Statcn, Sarah 
Struck, A.J. Tcatcrs, Christian 
Ward and John Wcbcl. 

One more time, "Happy birth- 
day Dennis Bergl,'* (sec, I didn't 



born on April 7 at 10:06 p.m. She forget your special day. Keep 
made her way into the world at scratching those lottery tickets. 
St Theresc Hospital and weighed One never knows!). 




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Max 6,1994 UIccIanH Newspapers COMMUNITY 





Homeowners associations organize 



Creative last minute 
Mother's Day ideas 



It's happened again! It seems . 
like just yesterday you looked at 
the calendar and it said 
March. ..but here you arc just 
days away from Mother's Day. 

What should you do? You can't 
forget again! You need the perfect 
gift that gives the impression of 
long-term planning and thought- 
fulness. 

Relax, Antioch. has many great 
gifts and thoughtful activities 
available that it'll be a piece of 
cake (Cake? What about a Baskin- 
Robhins ice cream cake!) 

If clothing. is the way to your 
mom's heart, it's time to stop by 
Jack's Four Squires for the latest 
in spring/summer apparel. 
Personalized service will make 
your gift selection easy and quick. 
Don't forget to stop by the 
Clothes Connection for an addi- 
tional selection of women's wear 
in sizes running petite through 
misses. 

Or do flowers bring a smile to 
mom's face? If so, Lasco's and 
Floral Acres both have large 
selections of fresh-cut flowers 
and arrangements available. 
Maybe a corsage for your favorite 
"date?" 

If your Mom is always brag- 
ging and showing pictures of her 
kids, check out the 
"Warhing...Mothers with Photos" 
T-shirts at Choosey Child. She 
can actually wear her kids' pic- 
tures. If there is a proud grandma 
in trie family/get fier one too! 
Don't forget to plan on brunch 
. with your mom. Hagan's and the 
Waterfall arc busy preparing spe- 
cial delicacies for that day. 
Reservations arc suggested. 

If your mom is a good sport, 
always willing to shoot a few bas- 
kets or throw a few curve balls, 
maybe it's time for some new 
sports equipment. Antioch Sports 
and BJ's Sports have a diverse 
selection of equipment, whether 
it's baseball, volleyball or bad- 
minton. If mom's been wanting 
some exercise equipment, stop 
by and talk to the knowledgeable 
staff at Antioch Schwinn, they 
carry a, wide range- of exercise 
equipment and stationary bikes. 

A day of beauty at any of the 



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salons in Antioch makes a won- 
derful gift for all moms and 
grandmas. It's a perfect gift that 
can fit any budget. Gift certifi- 
cates help make your choice per- 
sonal and special. 

If arts and crafts are your 
mom's forte, it's time to stop at 
Ben Franklin and look through 
their extensive selection of craft 
supplies and materials. Whether 
her interest is in flower arranging 
or sewing, the staff can help you 
select the right gift 

What about jewelry? If you've 
always meant to pick out a spe- 
cial piece of jewelry to express 
your feeling's maybe mis is the 
perfect time. Talk to Johnson's 
Jeweler's or Pcrsins and Pcrsins 
for thoughtful suggestions to fit 
your budget. 

' Don't forget the kids. Kids love 
to shop for gifts for their moms. 
Whether it's a fancy box of 
Kleenex or a two carat diamond 
' ring they bought at a fun fair at 
school, they are happy to give 
mom a gift, It's the thought that 
counts, so bring mom to the 
Antioch Kite Fly on Saturday, 
May 7, to participate in the 
Mother's kite flying contest. It's a 
wonderful way to spend a day of 
quality time with your family. 
Kids get free kites and mom gets a 
chance to win a mother's cup. 
Have a wonderful Mother's day. 
(Here's >taf_i tip for next yean 
Mother's Day is on May 14!) 

Editor's note: Shop Antioch is a 

. weekly newsletter showcasing 

Antioch's merchants and retailers. 

Prepared and written by Barbara 

Porch of Choosey Child. 



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395-1089 



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Representatives from home- 
owner associations in the unin- 
corporated areas of Antioch 
Township met for the third time 
to establish goals and the direc- 
tion of the group. The first order 
of business was to select a name 
for the organization. 

After an extensive discussion 
the representatives chose United 
Homeowners Association of 
Unincorporated Antioch 

(UHAUA). The group wanted a 
name that represented a solidari- 
ty between the almost 40 differ- 
ent homeowner associations 
within ' the unincorporated 
Antioch Township area. 

The purpose of the group is to 
share ideas and solutions to the 
common problems facing these 
almost silent forms of govern- 
ment. At this meeting the group 
discussed the problem of subdi- 
vision roads, the possibility of 
. approaching different govern- 
ment entities about sewer and 
water service, the problems of 
adverse possession of common 
areas, state requirements of not- 
for-profit corporations, liability 
insurance,' and garbage and 
waste collection services. 

Some of the new associations 
hooked up with more established, 
groups to brainstorm organiza- 
tional issues including dues 
issues and by-laws. The Loon 



Lake associations invited the oth- 
ers to the Citizens Against Unsafe 
Electricity (CAUSE) dance and 
raffle held on April 30 at the Lake 
Villa VFW Hall. Many Loon Lake 
associations arc involved with the 
CAUSE effort to stop 
Commonwealth Edison from 
putting overhead lines in their 
area. 

After the name had been 
selected, the group then elected 
Carol Jonitcs, of Felter's 
Subdivision, as president. Phil 
Burgdorf, of Lotus Shores, was 
elected treasurer and Mary Foley, 
of Fcltcrs, was made secretary. 

Terry Colby, of Channel Lake 
Bluffs, was made head of the 
membership committee. Her 
' duties will include the recruit- 
ment of homeowner associations 
that have not yet joined the orga- 
nization. Colby will also attempt 
to keep track of the large number 
of associations. At this time there 
arc several associations that were 
discovered on the taxrolls but 
UHAUA have been unable to 
contact 

Lillian Gollonka, of North 
Shore Improvement, volunteered 
to contact other associations in 
the Loon Lake area. She esti- 
mates there arc 14 associations in 
that area alone. Gollonkis told the 
group that some of those associa- 
tions arc under the misapprehen- 



sion that UHAUA is limited to 
associations which arc located on 
the Chain O'Lakes. . 

Many of the associations that 
attended have specific interests 
or problems they arc facing 
immediately. Some arc attempt- 
ing to deal with issues regarding 
property disputes, while others 
have decreasing dues-paying 
memberships. As a group, the 
members of UHAUA offer sug- 
gestions to help and many found 
that other subdivisions had faced 
the same problems in the past. 

• The group discussed the type' 
of chemicals subdivisions in the 
Lake Catherine and Channel Lake 
areas will be using to combat the 
weed problem. The group had 
been told at .an earlier meeting 
that it is necessary for all the sub- 
divisions to use the same chemi- 
cal and the herbicide 2-4-D has 
been selected. ' 

Matters of insurance, garbage 
collection, and area security will 
be on the agenda for discussion 
at the next meeting which has. 
been scheduled for June 22 at 7 
p.m. Fcltcrs Association has 
again offered their clubhouse for 
the next meeting. 

Associations interested in get- 
ting more information regarding 
the group or who wish to attend 
the next meeting should call 
Carol Jonitcs at 395-7371. 



Vocational student is tops in medical contest 



Tonya Keel, an ACHS student 
who attends the Lake County 
Area Vocational Center, in the 
Medical Assisting Program, par- 
ticipated in the Illinois Health 
Occupation Students of America 
(HOSA) State Conference April 6 
through. 8,- in Springfield. Keel 
received first place in clinical 
medical assisting, which qualifies 
her to participate at the National 
Conference June 22 through 26 in 



Nashville, Term. 

Several ACHS students who 
attended the Lake County Area 
Vocational Center in various pro- 
grams competed in the Illinois 
Vocation Industrial Clubs of 
America (VICA) held in 
Springfield on April 14 through 
16, and. received the following 
awards: 

Kim Cashmorc, cosmetology, 



fourth; Ryan Garrett, carpentry, 
sixth; Nick Hcclcin, welding, 
third; Brian Hribar, air cooled 
engine repair, sixth; Andrew 
Konrath, creative photography 
(black and white), third; Andrew 
Konrath, commercial photogra- 
phy, fifth; Joshua Pompco, com- 
mercial photography, second; 
Tina Stochmal, nursing assistant, 
second; Molly Swcaringen, cos- 
metology, third. 



' . ■ 





Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Friday 



10. a.m.- Free Glaucoma 
2 p.m. Screening & 
Testing at First 
National Bank of 
Antioch 



Saturday 



to 



Tuesday 

7:15 a.m. Exchange Club 
Meeting at 
Struggles 

6 p.m. Antioch Junior 
Woman's Club 
Closing Dinner, 
at The Waterfall 
Restaurant 



9 a.m.- Antioch Lower 
3 p.m. Grade PTO 

Sponsors a Spring 
Flower Sale, at 
. Antioch Lower 
Grade School 

Anlioch High 
School Kite Flying 
Contest-Antioch 
Chamber of , 
Commerce at 
the Football 
Practice Field 



Sunday 



8 



Lake County 
Fairgrounds 
Presents Antiques 



Mother's Day 



Wednesday 



n 



7:30 p.m. Antioch 

Commission on 
the Environment 
Meeting. Village 

Hall 

i 

Antioch High 
School Junior/ 
Senior Preprom 
Assembly 



Monday 



Village Brush 
Pick Up 



Thursday 



12 



7:30 Learn to Country 

Dance Presented 
by CAUSE at 
Antioch VFW. 
Antioch. Call 
356-7786 



Coming Up: 

May 13 Antioch High 
School Prom 
Cotillion, Palatine 

May 13 Miss Antioch & 
5 p.m. Little Miss Antioch 
Application 
Forms Due at 
Village Hall 

May 14 Antioch High 
12-4 a.m. School, SAP Post 
Prom 



I 



J 

if 



;.: ■■■:>■ , 



GOT SOMETHING GOING ON? CALL USI Nancy Rasmus 223-8161, 



"-:' . ■ . - : ' 




H COMMUNITY LAkElANtl Nrws|>A|)cns May 6, 1994 



1' 



>-4 



Local pharmacist nominated 
for 'Reminisce' Club award 



From tIhe Cap.taI 



US Cong. Philip M. Crane (R) 



Kcven Micrzwa, a pharmacist 
at Osco Drugs in Antloch, has 
been nominated for a national 
"Reminisce" Ciub award for 
"going the extra mile" in provid- 
ing outstanding service to senior 
citizens. 

If Micrzwa is eventually select- 
ed as one of 10 national winners, 
he will win a free trip to Hawaii. 
Ten of the week-long trips arc 
awarded each month in the pro- 
gram, and he is among over 600 
outstanding service industry peo- 
ple who were nominated by 
"Reminisce" Club members dur- 
ing February. 

The "Reminisce" Club, spon- 
sored by "Reminisce" magazine, 
has as its primary objective, "To 
elevate the regard, concern and 
service for folks over 50." Over 
two million "Reminisce" maga- 
zine subscribers located in alt 50 
states and Canada arc already 
members of the fast-growing 
club. 

Micrzwa was nominated for 
one of the Club's monthly awards 
by Mildred Anderson of Antioch. 

In the next 12 months, the 
"Reminisce" Club will award 120 
trips to Hawaii — 10 per month — 
to encourage anyone providing 
service for seniors to "go the extra 
mite," pay special attention to 



their needs, treat them witli 
respect and greet them with a 
smile. 

The latter goal explains the 
bold "A smile can mean 
milcs...AskaRemlniscer" burtons 
worn by many club members. 
Bach of the two million plus club 
members can nominate any serv- 
er for outstanding service, and 
the "miles" refers to the free trips 
to Hawaii awarded monthly. 

All nominations received each 
month arc first screened by vol- 
unteers at various senior centers, 
under the supervision of each 
center's activities director, and 
narrowed down to the final 100. 
Then the selection of monthly 
winners is made from these final- 
ists by a panel of senior judges. 

Each month's winners will be 
announced soon in the winners' 
hometown newspaper, as well as 
in "Reminisce" magazine and in 
"USA Today." At the end of the 
year, the club will name the 
"Senior Server of the Year" and 
present that person with a grand 
award package which, in addition 
to the trip to Hawaii, includes a 
new car (a Pontiac Grand Am), a 
trip to a dude ranch and a river 
cruise excursion on the Delta 
Queen. 



Crime bill is costly, negative 



Unless a Mouse-Senate conference committee 
can remove the undesirable elements of the House- 
passed Crime Bill, we arc faced with the possibility 
of President Clinton signing what I consider a cost- 
ly and negative bill. 

I Tic Crime Rill passed by the I louse last month is 
inadequate. Thirty-four Democrats joined 107 
Republicans in opposing legislation which passed 
by a vote of 282 to 141. 

It has been noted the bill goes too far to the left. 
It provides for allowing racial challenges to death 
sentences. It allots too much money for social pro- 
grams. 

The House bill has a price tag of $20 billion, com- 
pared to the $22 billion cost of the Senate-passed 
measure. I'm sure the conference committee will 
make a sizable reduction in the costs charged to the 
House bill, and the compromise version will be 
much closer to the Senate's $22 billion figure. 

What is particularly disturbing about the House 
bill is the so-called "racial justice" portion of it. This 
permits lawyers to use statistical evidence to 
demonstrate a racially discriminatory pattern when 
a convict is put on death row, as a way to bar the 
execution of the prisoner. 

Perhaps our colleague, Henry Hyde, put it best 
when he declared, "For the first time, it gives us a 




State to spend $19.1 million 
to improve area roads 



State Sen. Adeline J. Gco-Kuris 
(R-Zion) says the state will spend 
$19.1 million to improve high- 
ways and a bridge in the 31st 
District during the coming year. 

Sen. Gco-Karis said the area 
projects arc part of the state's 
$1.3 billion program announced 
by Gov. Jim Edgar to maintain 
and improve the highway system 
in fiscal year 1995, which begins 
July I. The program includes $95 
million to repair roads that were 
badly damaged by the severe 
winter weather and $23 million to 
assist with local government road 
work. The projects for the 31st 
Distrirt and their estimated costs 
arc: 

U.S. 41— $5.04 million for 
median repair, lighting, skid- 
proofing and loop detectors from 
III. 173 to Wadsworth Rd. 

111. 21— $400,000 for planning 
and engineering from 

Washington St. to III. 120 in 
Waukegan and Libertyville and 



$103,000 to install signals at 
Artaius Pkwy. 

111. 59— $3.58 million for 1.83 
miles of widening and resurfac- 
ing from III. 132 to Wilson Rd. 

111. 131 — $1.1 million for inter- 
section reconstruction at 111. 120. 

III. 173 — $3.5 million for resur- 
facing, intersection improvement 
and modernization of traffic sig- 
nals from 1-94 to 111. 131 and at III. 
131 andDelany Rd. 

Old Skokic Hwy.— $690,000 for 
1.73 miles of resurfacing from the 
Wisconsin state line to U.S. 41. 

Washington St— $4.66 million 
for reconstruction, bridge reha- 
bilitation and railroad separation 
rehabilitation from U.S. 41 to 
C&NW Railroad. 



LaIieIancj 

CUssificds 

(708) 227*8161 



There's No Place Like Home! 
Buying or Selling your home is a big 
decision. Once die decision to act is 
made the course of action can be 

. Always remember you make 

the decisions. 

As your realtor I am just a tool in your 
tool box. Property information, market 
activity, viewing homes, contracts & 
riders, marketing and... 




Rick Broquet 



I'll help you own your 
place called home. 






Wk: 249-6513 Hm: 356-6968 



R&ftlNK H.rltag. 



464 1 Grand Ave, Gumec, IL 6003 1 



color-conscious sentencing 
process rather than a color- 
blind one." In effect, this pro- 
vision could abolish the death' 
penalty. 

Some $7 billion Is ear- 
marked for crime prevention 
social programs, such as "mid- 
night basketball," which 
should be handled on the local 
level, not by federal legislation. 

I certainly agree with the 
House passage of provisions expanding the federal 
death penalty from two to 65 crimes, Including car- 
jackings and drive-by killings. 

I supported the move to spend $13.5 billion for 
grants for building state prisons, three times the 
amount approved by the Senate, and to authorize 
50,000 more police on the streets — half the number 
the Senate approved. 

Doth the House and the Senate approved the 
"three strikes and you're out" penalty— a life sen- 
tence for those convicted of three violent or drug- 
related crimes. 

Above it all, it is contradictory to label legislation 
as anti-crime when the bill all but puts an end to the 
death penalty. 




Scholastic Bowl winners 

Antloch Community High School's scholastic bowl team was won the IHSA Scholastic Bowl AA 
Sectional hela* at Round Lake High School, beating nine area schools. Antloch now advances 
to the state finals to be held In Springfield May 7. Members are (front, left to right) Kim Wlrsing, 
Mike Beadle, Katie Fettlng, ((back, left to right) coach Tome Herzlger, Steve Sprohk, Ryan Beall, 
Morgan Hirst, Keith Jackson, and coach Tom Blaslus. —Photo by BUI Dormody Jf. 



^^^Conic Worship With Us^W^ 

Astl y A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches y [yf^ 



Gracslarvd Baptist Church. 258 Ida St., Antioch, II. 
Sunday School 1 1 a.m„Momlng Worship 1 1 a.m., 
Sunday Evening 7 p.m. Robert Williams, Pastor 

Ftrsl Church of Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm. Rto. 
173 and Harden, Antloch. Phone (70B) 395-1196. Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Service 10:30 am. Wednesday, 
B p.m. 

Calvary Baptist Church. 554 Partway. Phone (708) 
395-3393. Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday Worship 
1 1 am. and 7 p.m. Pastor, Rev. Uoyd 0. Moss. Jr. 

St Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Main St., Phone (708) 395- 
0652. Low Mass 7:30 a.m., High Mass 9:30 a.m. Sunday 
School & Nursery 9:30 a.m. 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church, tiffany Rd. Phone 
(706) 395-4117. Sunday School 9:30 a.m., Sunday 
Worship 8:15 a.m. and 1 1 am., Children's Church 
1 1 a.m. Nursery both services, Awana Club, 8:30 p.m. 
Wednesday. 

St Stephen Lutheran Church. Hillside & Rte. 59. Phone 
(708) 395-3359, Sunday Worship, 8 and 10:00 am. 
Church School 9:15 a.m., Sunday Rev. Charles E. Miller, 
Pasior. 

Christian Life Fellowship Assemblies of God Church. 
41625 Deep Lake Rd.. Antioch. Phone (708) 395-8572. 
Sunday School (all ages) 9 am,, Sunday Morning 
Worship 10 a.m., Children's Church 10 am,. Sunday 
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m., Wednesday Worship & 



Children's Program 7 am., Tues. Women's Fellowship & 
Bible Study 9-1 1:30 am. Jeff Brussaly, Pastor. 

t-alth Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main SL Phone (708) ' 
395-1600, Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30 am,. Sunday 
School 9:25 am., Mon. 7 p.m. Rev, DaraJd Qruen, Rev. 
Gregory Hermanson, Pastors. Christian Day School (708) 
395-1664. 

Mlllburn Congregational United Church of Christ 
Grass Lake Rd. at Rte. 45 Phone (708) 358-5237. 
Sunday service 10 am. Children's program 10 am. Rev. 
Paul R. Meitzer, Pastor. 

United Methodist Church of Antloch. 848 Main SL 
Phone (708) 395-1259. Worship at 8:30 am. & 10:45 
a.m. Church School - classes for all ages. 9:30 am. The . 
Rev. Kurt A. Qamlin, Pastor. 

SL Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake St., Antloch. Phone 
(70B) 395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7:15 & B am., 
Sunday 6:30, a, 9:30, 11 am. & 12:15 p.m. Saturday 
5:30p.m. Pastor Rev, Fattier Lawrence Henley. 

Chain of Lake* Community Bible Church. 23201 W. 
Grass Lake Rd., Antloch, Phone (708) 638-0103 Sunday 
Worship 8:15 and 10:45. Sunday School 9:45. Children's 
Church 1 0:45. Youth, Women's, Awana & Small Group 
ministries. Senior Pastor, Rev. Don Sweeting. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod), 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rts. 59 & 132), Lake Villa, (706) 
356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:45 am.; Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 8:30 a.m. Rev. John 
Zellmor, Pasior, Christian Preschool, 



Dan Dugonske, Director 
This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 












May 6, 1994 UtelANd Ncwspapere COMMUNITY fy /£._; 




From page Al 
future." 

The rczonlng was done in two 
steps. The board first zoned the 
four properties that. had not 
joined the petition. Out of the 
four, one homeowner had no 
objection, another did not 
respond to inquiries, and two 
sent letters asking the board to 
leave the zoning at II- 5. 

"We feci wc arc being dam- 
aged/ 1 said VandcrMccr contract 



Edison 



owner of one of the properties. 
lie said the rczonlng would take 
money out of the pockets of both 
himself and his brother, co-own- 
ers of the property. 

However, the board had a 
number of concerns about only 
rczonlng the eight properties. "If 
wc let everyone do their own 
thing, that is spot zoning," said 
Mayor Marilyn Shineflug. 

"Frankly, It would be better 



From page Al 

Initially, CAUSE argued that 
the proposed overhead power 
lines would be a danger to the 
community by increasing elec- 
tromagnetic field (EMF) expo- 
sure. However, the thrust of their 
argument before the board did 
not address the issue. 

Trexler said Edison represen- 
tatives were surprised by the 
omission. In addition, according 
to Trexler, the proposed 138-kilo- 
watt line would actually produce 
lower levels of EMF than CAUSE'S 
suggested lower level lines. 

Both sides will submit their 
briefs on the testimony by June 
10. Each side will then have an 



opportunity to respond by July 
20. After the responses have been 
filed, the hearing officer will issue 
a proposed order and each side 
will have yet one more opportu- 
nity to respond. 

- After both sides respond, the 
commission will then take a vote. 
If Edison has its way, they will 
then receive a certificate of need 
from the Illinois Commerce 
Commission. That would give 
them the right to put up the line. 
It is unknown when the issue will 
be completed. 

"It could be three to five 
months," said Trexler. "We just 
don't know." 



CAUSE 



i I 



From page Al 

which serves most of 

Undenhurst" 

Pierce said Edison could con- 
struct a transmission substation 
at the Rollins Road site which 
would be less costly than the 
Edison proposal. He said even if 
Abbott Laboratories comes into 7 ' 
the area by Route 173, Edison 
could build a substation for their 
needs and surrounding develop- 
! ment. 

CAUSE feels it shouldn't have 
. to pay for the removal of an old 
transmission distribution center 
on Routes 173 and 59 in Antioch. 
If the Edison plan wins Illinois 
Commerce Commission (ICC) 
approval, the rate payers would 
finance removal of the site. 

"CAUSE believes the Illinois 
Commerce Commission and the 
rate payers in Illinois should not 
be subjected to the satisfaction of 
Antioch village officials plans to 
remove the Edison distribution 



center at Routes 59 and 173 to 
please developers and the vil- 
lage/ Pierce said. 

Pierce said CAUSE backed off 
on its electromagnetic fields 
argument because there are no 
laws the ICC could use in making 
"a decision on Edison getting the 
transmission line. He said Edison 
has blocked all attempts in the 
committee stages. 

CAUSE is trying to prove 
Edison doesn't need a large trans- 
mission center in Antioch to meet 
current and future needs. The 
group feels substations in Round 
Lake Beach and near the future 
Abbott site will more than ade- 
quately meet the current and pro- 
jected needs. 

The initial briefs will be in by 
June. In July the attorneys are 
going to file final briefs and Pierce 
expects the ICC examiner to 
make a written opinion to the full 
ICC board in the fall. 



Waterway Agency director 
to chair national conference 



TINA L SWIECH 



Staff Reporter 

The Chain O' Lakes Fox River 
Waterway Management 

Agency's Executive Director, 
Karen Kabbcs, has been chosen 
to chair a national floodplain 
and watershed conference pro- 
gram in Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

Resides renowned speakers 
who will be present at the 
intense three-day seminar, the 
meeting is a very important one 
because of changing flood poli- 
cies with the U.S. Army Corps 
and FEMA (Federal Emergency 
Management Agency). 

This is mainly due to last year's 
massive flooding in the Midwest 
General Galloway, the head of 
the White House Task Force, will 
be present at the conference to 
give some insight on the chang- 
ing policies. 

In part due to her expertise in 
state and national water issues, 
especially , those relating to 



floodplains, Kabbcs was chosen 
to chair the national program. 

Before going to work for the 
Waterway Agency, Kabbcs was 
the chief engineer for the Lake 
County Stormwater 

Management Agency, and then 
was employed by the state of 
Illinois in a related field. 

Earlier this spring she 
received an award for her work 
on state issues and as part of a 
federal agency task force. 

"It's been exciting," 
explained Kabbcs. "I've had 
access to different people, and 
can better run our programs (at 
the agency)." 

The conference will no doubt 
educate Kabbes even more, 
bringing back with her a pletho- 
ra of knowledge and ideas to use 
at the Agency. 

No travel costs will be 
incurred by the Waterway 
Agency for the trip to Tulsa. 



not to change the zoning at all," 
Village Planner Robert Silhan 
told the board, "If you don't zone 
it all the same." ' Silhan told the 
board that spot zoning affects the 
property values, and to expect 
zoning problems "down the 
road" if the four properties 
remained R-5 while the eight 
properties changed to R-3. 

In the end, the board voted 
unanimously to rczdhc all 12 
properties. Then, the board had 



to decide on variations requested 
for 307 Ida, the reason the zoning 
Issue came to light in the first 
place. 

The variation requests were 
to split the 90 foot property into 
two 45 foot lots, and allow a five 
foot variance on each. 
VandcrMccr is planning to build 
a single dwelling residence 
instead of a multi-family. Two 
board members had objections 
to that propose 




"It is just too small to build a 
house on," said Trustee Ron 
Cunningham. Trustee Don 
Amundsen concurred, "I don't 
want to split up a 90 foot lot into 
two 45 foot lots. . ; . It is simply to 
make money for the developer." 

In the end the variances were 
also approved by a vote of four to 
two. Residents attending the 
meeting applauded the board for 
their actions. 



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COMMUNITY UkrkNcJ Newspapers MUy 6, 1994 



AARP members enjoy 
social meeting 






The second meeting of every 
month Is a social meeting for 
members of Antioch Chapter 
387, AARP. On April 26, mem- 
bers enjoyed Subway sand- 
wiches with homemade cook- 
ies for desert, courtesy of the 
1st National Bank of Antioch. 
Following lunch,' bingo and 
card games were played. 

It was at this meeting that 
Clara Haling, public relations, 
announced Pearl Roach has 
been selected to receive an 
"Outstanding Lake County 
Senior" award from the Lake 
County Council for Seniors. 
She will receive the award at 
the annual Memorial 

Recognition Luncheon at 
Maravcla's Restaurant in 
Inglcsidc on May 12. Anyone 
interested in attending the 
luncheon may call 244-1720 for 
reservations. ' 



Next meeting of Chapter 307 
will be on May 10. It will be a 
business meeting with lun- 
cheon served by the Senior 
Center, 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
The VILLAGE OF AMTIOCH 
will ba flushing hydrants 
between May 1, 1994 end May 
15, 1994. Flushing will occur 
between the hours of 6:00 A.M. 
and 4:00 P.M. Monday thru 
Friday. Signs will be posted in 
each area before flushing begins. 
It is advised that no laundry be 
done between these hours when 
flushing occurs. 

Also, it advised that water be 
visually tested for rust before 
doing laundry. FOR MORE 
INFORMATION, CALL (708) 
395-1881. 

0494D-617-AR 

April 22, 1994 

April 29, 1994 

May 6, 1994 



- 



fc 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
COUNTY ZONING NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS ) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) SS #2942 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given to all persons in the town of 
Antioch, Lake County, Illinois, that a public hearing will be held on 
Wednesday, May 25, 1994, at 1:30 p.m., in the Antioch Township Hall, 
99 Highway 173, Antioch, IL 60002, relative to a request to rezone a 
certain parcel of property from the Estate (E) Zone to the Suburban (S) 
Zone. The property in question is legally described as follows: 

The North half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 19, Township 46 
North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, (except the East 
40 rods thereof and also except those parts thereof, described as fol- 
lows, to-wit: commencing at the South West comer of said Half Quarter 
Section thence East on the South line of said Half Quarter Section, 
181.5 feet to a point in the Center of State Bond Issue Route No. 59; 
thence East on a prolongation of last described course (which is also 
the center of State Aid Route No. 18), 283.0 feet; thence Northerly 
along a line which forms an angle of 99 degrees minutes with the last 
described course, measured from West to North for a distance of 339.7 
feet; thence West parallel with the center of said State Aid Route No. 

18, 236.0 feet to center of said State Bond Issue Route No. 59; thence 
Northerly along the center of State Bond Issue Route No. 59 to the 
North line of said North Half of said South East Quarter of said Section 
19; thence West along said North line to the North West comer of said 
Half Quarter Section; and thence South along the West line of said Half 
Quarter Section to place of beginning, and except the West 126 feet of 
the East 786 feet of the South 1037.2 feet of said North East Quarter 
of the South East Quarter of said Section 19, and except the West 186 
feet of the East 846 feet (except the East 126 feet of the South 1037.2 
feet thereof), of the North East Quarter of the South East Quarter of 
said Section 19, and except the South 220.2 feet of the West 100 feet 
of the East 1246 feet of the North half of the South East Quarter of said 
Section- 19, and except the South 220.2 feet of the West 150 feet of the 
East 996 feet of the North half of the South East Quarter of said Section 

19, and except the South 220.2 feet of the West 150 feet of the East 
1 146 feet of the North Half of the South East Quarter of said Section 
19, and except Lot 1 in Peder Toffs First Subdivision, being a subdivi- 
sion of part of the North West Quarter of the South East Quarter of said 
Section 19, and except the North 342.78 feet of the North Half of the 
South East Quarter of Section 19, lying East of the East line of State 
Bond Issue Route No. 59 as dedicated by Document 304457 and West 
of the East 846 feet of the North Half of the South East Quarter of said 
Section 19), and except a strip of land 50 feet wide as measured along 
the center line of Grass Lake Road lying Easterly and adjacent to the 
East line of Lot 1 in Peder Toffs First Subdivision, a part of the South 
East Quarter of Section 19, Township 46 North, Range 10, East of the 
Third Principal Meridian, and also lying Easterly and adjacent to the fol- 
lowing described parcel that part of the North West Quarter Southeast 
Quarter of Section 19, Township 46 North, Range 10, East of the Third 
Principal Meridian, Lake County, Illinois, described as follows: begin- 
ning at the South West comer of the North West Quarter, South East 
Quarter of said Section 19; thence East of the South line of said 
Quarter Quarter Section 181.5 feet to a point in the center of State 
Bond Issue Route 59, said point being the point of beginning of this 
description; thence East on a prolongation of last described course 
which is also the center of State Aid Route 18, for a distance of 283.0 
feet, thence Northerly along a line which forms an angle of 99 degrees 
- degrees with last described course, measured from West to North, 
for a distance of 339.7 feet; thence West parallel with center of State 
Aid Route 18, 236.0 feet to the center of State Bond Issue Route 59; 
thence Southwesterly of center Route 59, 350.1 feet to the point of 
beginning, in Lake County, Illinois. 

The subject property is located on the northeast comer of the inter- 
section of Route 59 and Grass Lake Road and contains approximately 
2? acn&s 

" As a result of the petition of FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 
CHURCH (contract purchaser) and CHICAGO TITLE A TRUST COM- 
PANY T/A dated 7/30/62 and known as Trust #44722 (record own- 
ers), which petition is on file and available for examination in the office 
of the Lake County Zoning Board of Appeals, County Administration 
Buikf ng, 18 N. County St., Waukegan, IL 60085. All interested persons 
.are Invited to attend said hearing and be heard. 
LAKE COUNTY ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
CLAYTON L CHRISTENSEN 
Chairman 

For this hearing, reasonable accommodation will be made for hand- 
icapped persons. This includes accommodation for the vision and hear- 
ing impaired if a request is made within 48 hours of the meeting time. 

Dated at Waukegan, Illinois, this 29th day of April 1994. 
Legals 0594A-677-AR 

#2942 < May 6, 1994 






PUBLIC NOTICE 
REPORT OF CONDITION 

Consolidating domestic subsidiaries of the FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF ANTIOCH in the state of ILLINOIS, at 
the close of business on March 31 , 1994, published in response to call made by Comptroller of the Currency, under 
title 12, United States Code, Section 161. 

Charier number 1 2870-5321 Comptroller of the Currency CENTRAL District. 

Statement of Resources and Liabilities 

Thousands of dollars 
ASSETS 
Cash and balances due from depository institutions: 

Nonlnterest-bearing balances and currency and coin 

Interest-bearing balances 
Held-to-maturity securities 
Available-for-sale securities 
Federal funds sold 

Securities purchased under agreements to resell 
Loans and lease financing receivables: 

Loans and leases, net of unearned Income 55,91 5 

LESS: Allowance for loan and lease losses 877 

LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve -o- 

Loans and leases, net of unearned income, allowance, and reserve 
Assets held in trading accounts 
Premises and fixed assets (including capitalized leases) 
Other real estate owned 

Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies 
Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 
Intangible assets 
Other assets 
Total assets 

Losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1 823(j) 
Total assets and losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823(j) 

LIABILITIES 



2,097 
-0- 

3,112 

20,558 

-0- 

-0* 



55,038 

•0- 

2,479 

• -0- 

-0- 

-0- 

-0- 

937 

84,221 

' -0- 

84,221 



74,834 



425 

2,300 

-0- 

-0- 



Deposits: 

In domestic offices 

Nonlnterest-bearing ' 7,687 

Interest-bearing 67,147 

Federal funds purchased 
Securities sold under agreements to repurchase 
Demand notes issued to the U.S. Treasury 
Trading Liabilities 
Other borrowed money: 

With original maturity of one year or less , -0* 

With original maturity of more than one year . . -0- 

Mortgage indebtedness and obligations under capitalized leases -0- 

Bank s liability on acceptances executed and outstanding -0- 

Subordinateo notes and debentures -0- 

Other liabilities . 572 

Total liabilities ; 78,131 

Limited-life preferred stock and related surplus -0- 

EQUITY CAPITAL 
Perpetual preferred stock and related surplus 
Common stock 
Surplus 

Undivided profits and capital reserves 

Net unrealized holding gains (losses) on available-for-sale securities 
Total equity capital 

Total liabilities, limited-life preferred stock, and equity capital 
Losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823(j) . 
Total equity capita) and losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1 823(j) 
Total liabilities, limited-life preferred stock, equity capital, and losses 

deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823(j) 

I, LOUIS KORUM III, SR. VICE PRESIDENT & CASHIER of the above-named bank, do hereby certify that 
this report of condition is true and correct, to the best of my knowledge and belief. 



537 

1,897 

3,869 

(213) 

6,090 

84,221 

-0- 

-0- 

84,221 



/s/ Louis Korum III 
April 25, 1994 
We, the undersigned directors, attest to the correctness of this statement of resources and liabilities. We 
declare that it has been examined by us, and to the best of our knowledge and belief has been prepared in con- 
formance with the instructions and is true and correct Ted C. Axton 

Dean A. Pedersen 
Donald C. Marskl 
Directors 



-ii,',^.»0594A-674-AR 
May 6, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REPORT OF CONDITION 

Account Number: 10413 

CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION including domestic and foreign subsidiaries and foreign branches 
of State Bank of the Lakes located in Antioch, Illinois at the close of business March 31, 1994. Published in 
Response to Call of the COMMISSIONER OF BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES of the State of Illinois. 

BALANCE SHEET 

fTHOUSANDS) 
ASSETS 

1. Cash and balances due from depository institutions: 

a. Noninterest-bearing balances and currency and coin 6,713 

b. Interest-bearing balances -0- 

2. Securities 74,851 

3. Federal Funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell: 

a. Federal funds sold 3,663 

b. Securities purchased under agreements to resell -0- 

4. Loans and lease financing receivables: 

a. Loans and leases, net of unearned income 135,460 

b. LESS: Allowance for loan and lease losses 1 ,672 

c. LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve -0- 

d. Loans and leases, net of unearned income, allowance, and reserve 

(item 4.a minus 4.b and 4.c) 133,788 

5. Assets held in trading accounts -0- 

6. Premises and fixed assets (including capitalized leases) 5,215 

7. Other real estate owned 53 

8. Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies -0- 

9. Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding -0- 

10. Intangible assets -o- 

11. Other assets 2,881 

12. a. TOTAL ASSETS (sum of items 1 through 1 1) 227,164 

b. Loss defened pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823G)(from Schedule RC-M) -0- 

c. Total assets and losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. -0- 

LIABILITIES 

13. Deposits: 

a. In domestic offices 205,596 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 21,367 

(2) Interest-bearing 184,229 

b. In foreign offices. Edge. and Agreement Subsidiaries, and IBFs ' - -0- 

(1) Noninterest-bearing -0- 

(2) Interest-bearing -0- 

14. Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase: 

a. Federal funds purchased -0- 

b. Securities sola under agreements to repurchase 849 

1 5. Demand notes issued to the U.S. Treasury -o- 

16. Other borrowed money « -0- 

17. Mortgage indebtedness and obligations under capitalized leases -o- 

18. Bank s liability on acceptances executed and outstanding -0- 

19. Notes and debentures subordinated to deposits -0- 

20. Other liabilities 1.741 

21. TOTAL LIABILITIES (sums of 13 through 20) 208,186 

22. Limited-life preferred stock •"' -o- 

EQUITY CAPITAL 

23. Perpetual preferred stock -o- 

24. Common stock 993 

25. Surplus 12,757 

26. Undivided profits and capital reserves 5,228 

27. Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustment -0- 

28. TOTAL EQUITY CAPlTALfeums of items 23through 27) 18,978 

29. TOTAL LIABILITIES, LIMITED-LIFE PREFERREDBTOCK AND 

EQUITY CAPITAL (sum of items 21 , 22, and 28) 227,164 

I, Roger V. Manderscheid, Executive V.P., of the above-named bank, do hereby certify that this report of condi- 
tion is true and correct, to the best of my knowledge and belief. Conect- Attest: Roger V. Manderscheid 

Timothy H. Osmond 
JohnJ.Thelen 
Randolph S. Miles 
Directors 
State of Illinois, County of Lake, ss: Sworn to and subscribed before me this 26th day of April, 1994. My com- 
mission expires August 27, 1995, Dorma M. Geiger, Notary Public 

(OFFICIAL SEAL) 

0594A-666-AR 

, .. . May 6, 1994 



■ 









MAy 6, 1994 UkelAwd NewspapcRS COMMUNITY 





■ ■ 



THIS 

Soccer results 

;Llhdenhurst traveling*^ 
cer teams kick it around 
FV\GE 1 ?A 



Summer 
camps 

Antioch, Grayslake schools 

offering summer camps 

RACE12A 

For More Sports 
See Page CJ2 



': 



i»-c»3>i«iS''?>*>s»c*<(a 



BamI>.\II kisdi 



PrWay, April It r*«ilu 
Lake Zaricht, Woodstock 7 

v^VdsIck 05^100^0-i7^;13 3 
LZ Oil 150 x— 8 7 3 

WP: Wihkeiman (3-lj; HR: Chad 

, LeavlttfLZ). . 
Antioch 2, Warren 
Ant^ *002?0<HH0-^2;.3 2 
War ^- 000 000 x^-0 3 2 
WP: CaiicyO'ConncU; LP: Joel, v 



x Ube rtyvtlle 4, Montiekln 1 
Mund : ; 000 001 0—13 2 
Lib s~%':. 012 (010 x— 4 10 
WP: Chris Fulbrigbt (5-0); LP: . ' 
Keith Seimbal.-. .'.-.. 
Lake Forest 3, Zion- Benton 
ZB 000 000 0^-0 1^ 

LF 000 120x-^-3 6 

.WP: Mike Rhlries (.i-O); LP: David 

vGrifllh.T'.itf.i"' V. ' / ....-.'.■ :- % 
Grant 7, Round Lake 5 
RL 000 103 1—5 7r 3 

Grant 000 160 x-4-7 ' 6v 4^: 
WP: Dan Durilavy (6-3); LP: Bill 
Zicbcll;HR: Ryan Bauer (RL). > 

Softball 

Friday, April 38 result* 
Ubertyvilie 9, Mundeleln 6 

Ub ■■■--. ; 000-135 0—9 12 
Mund ' 120 200 1-^6; 7 >5# 
WP: Marsha Fletcher (7-1); LP: 
Lindsey Prezell; v 

Antioch 3, Warren 2 
War >000 000 20r-2 3 
Ant 100,000 11— 3 5 2 

P: Katie Feting (6-4); LP: Tanille ; ■, 
Baaskc. '. X^:.-' : 

Zton-Benton 9, Lake Foreat 7 
LF j; ■ 000 061 00--7 7 8 " 
ZB 101 401 01--8 5 4 ; 

WP. Jen Pitcher (6-7); LP: Vaiassis; . 
HR: Shannon Mays (ZB). \ 
Ron nd lit 6, Marian Central S 
MC 001002 0— 3 4 2 

RL 220 020 x-^6 4 1 

WP: Shannon Zink (10-1); LP: 
Hagerty. 

Deerfleld 8, Waukejan 2 
Wauk 000 002 0—2 4 2 
Deer ^ KV 012 131 x— 8 .1 12 
WPiEmilieWUllamsjLP: 
Christine Bouffard (9-1); HR: . i 
BetsySailhamer (D)/ ■ 
Mc Henry 6, Grants 
Grant 000 140 ni-5 5 . 2 
McH 500-010 0—6 8 3 
LP: Melissa Rodriguez. - 



Antideh's 




The University of 
Wisconsin- Parkside men's 
soccer team announced the 
signing of Antioch'S: Dave 
Johnson for the fall of 1994. 

Johnson, a 6 foot, 4 inch, 
180 pound defender was an 
Integral part of his team's 15- 
6-3 record his senior year. 
From his sweeper position he 
recorded two goals and seven 
assists. , 

In the off-season, Dave 
plays club soccer with the 
Green/ VVVhite i Soccer Club 
where he is coached by Alex 

■ Gyurko, 

The UW-Parkside team; 
coached by Rick Kilps, fin- 
ished 15-2-1 last season and 
finished the season ranked 
14th in the NCAA Division II. 



Antioch track contingent set to take on county meet 



Crystal Lake Central's Invita- 
tional proved to be a solid warm- 
up for the Antioch boys track and 
field team. 

The Scquoits tied Bclvidcrc for 
second place with 99 points, 
seven shy of winner Crystal Lake 
Central. Antioch is looking to 
challenge Waukcgan for the Lake 
County title lytay 7 in Barrington. 

"The Crystal Lake Central 
meet was pretty tough. There 
were 15 schools there. I was 
happy with our finish, we placed 
in 14 of 18 events, but we could 
have won it," Antioch Coach 
Norm Hahn said. 

Round Lake was the other area 
team, finishing ninth with 19 
points. 



Almost all Lake County teams 
will be preparing for the. county 
meet at Barrington High. Zion- 
Bcnton is the lone absentee. 

"If we are healthy, wc have a 
good shot at second and an out- 
side shot at first," Hahn said, 

A disqualification cost Antioch 
the win in the 400 meters and 
ultimately the meet title. Larry 
Schmidt was an unexpected 
competitor for Antioch. He won 
the event in 51:4, but apparently 
crossed into a lane when it is not 
allowed and was disqualified. 

"lie runs a lot in relays and he 
got confused," Hahn said. 

. Aaron Bell provided the high- 
light for Antioch. He set a CLC 
meet record with a 6 feet, 7 Inch 



effort in the high jump. "He just 
missed at 7 feet. Shannon King 
(Waukcgan) Is at 7-0 and he Bell 
has the potential," Hahn said. 

If. we are healthy, 
we have a good 
shot at second and 
an outside shot at 
first/ 

—Norm Hahn 
Antioch Coach 

The 800 meter relay team of 
Matt Fasana, Brad Rubash, Joe 
Earl, John Schultz won in 1:34.7, 
its best. 

Junior Kevin Erickson was sec- 
ond in the 800 meters and senior 
Jeremy Garbacz, running 2:04 



and 2:05, respectively. 

Jake Nathan took- a second in 
the discus with a 137.2, 

The 3,200 meter relay was 
fourth. 

Kevin Fasana and Rubash 
earned Antioch finishes in the 
110 high hurdles, ending third 
and fifth. 

Mike Shea was third in the 
shot put 

Bob Swanson gave Round 
Lake its highlights with a fifth in. 
the long jump at 18 10.5 and third 
in the triple jump, 40 2.5. 

Antioch recorded two dual 
wins. Antioch clubbed Zlon- 
Bcnton 81-65 and ' Mundeleln 
130-10 in NSC action for a 7-1 
record, 4-0 conference. 





Newspapers 




Sequoit pitching coming 
together in home stretch 



Strategy meeting 

Antioch Baseball Coach Paul Petty and Asst. Coach Terry 
Plerman discuss strategy before the start of a game.— Photo 
by Kevin Hanrahan 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

The Antioch High School 
baseball team garnered two con- 
ference wins last week thanks to 
some strong pitching and timely 
hitting. 

After losing a heart breaker 3-2 
to arch rival Warren, the Scquoits 
came back to even the scries with 
a 2-0 shutout Friday. 

Casey O'Conncll one-hit the 
Blue Devils, and his offense man- 
aged three hits to score two runs. 

"Casey's pitching was pretty 
flawless," said Sequoit Coach 
Paul Petty. "Wc strung together a 
couple of hits, and that's all it 
took" 

The defensive also came 
through to prevent any mistakes 
from hurting a near-perfect 
game. 

"We're definitely playing bet- 
ter baseball," Petty noted. 

After a rain-sleet-snow 
washout Saturday, the Sequoits 




Sparing 

Bobby Biro and Steven Glewlck spar In the Midwest Regional Tae Kwon Do Championship 
which were held In Antioch last week.— Photo by Mil Carey 



let a non-conference game 
escape them as they lost to Cary 
Grove 6-5. 

But again, the Sequoits came 
back to beat North Chicago 
Tuesday 4-0. 

Eric Eckcnstahler struckout 
16, walked three and allowed 
three hits. • Two of North 
Chicago's hits split the infield, 
Petty said. 

O'Conncll was a home run 
short of hitting for the cycle as he 
connected for a single, double 
and triple. Tom Furlan and Matt 
DcMartini also had key base hits. 

In addition to Eckenstahier's 
performance, Petty noted again 
that the defense came through in 
a close game. North Chicago, 
despite its winlcss record in the 
North Suburban Conference, is 
"a team that doesn't give up," 
Petty said. 

"Defensively, we're just about 
over the hump," Petty said. "The 
kids arc beginning to understand 
that every ball hit into play is 
important" 

The Scquoits have lost many 
close, one-run games this year. 

With the pitching and the 
defense beginning to come 
around, Petty said he hopes the 
hitting begins to rejuvenate for 
the home stretch. The team was 
hitting over .300 earlier in the 
season, but the team batting 
average has dipped to .275 in 
recent games. 

"The conference pitchers are 
tough, and some of the kids have 
their own personal slumps 
going," Petty said of the team's 
hitting. 

The Sequoit record is 7-16-1 
overall and 3-6 in NSC play. They 
can pass Fcnton (3-4, NSC) in the 
standings Saturday. 

Opening Days set 
for Antioch leagues 

Mark your calendars Antioch 
boys and girls little leaguers. 
Opening Day is approaching. 

Three separate Opening Day 
ceremonies will be held for the 
ball players of the Antioch Youth 
Baseball League. 

On May 7, the Major League 
boys (10-12 year olds) league will 
kick off at 11a.m. 




COMMUNITY UkElANd Newspapers M*y 6, 1994 



v 



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■ 

I: - 
I 



fit 



i 






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Football, basketball camps Trahan injured after 3 goals 

offered for Gray slake 



Grayslakc District 46 will be 
hosting girls and boys basketball 
summer camps and a football 
camp will be offered at Central 
Park. 

The basketball camp at 
Grayslakc Middle School will be 
from June 20 - July 21, Monday 
through Thursday. There will not 
be camp July 4-8. 

Third through fifth grade 
boys basketball camp meets 0:15 
to 10 a.m. with sixth through 
eighth graders 10:15 to 12 p.m. 

Sixth through eighth grade 
girls meet from 12:15 to 2 p.m. 
with third through fifth graders 
from 2:15 to 4 p.m. 

These camps arc designed to 



Include four days of progressive 
drills and strategy sessions, fol- 
lowed by 12 days of league play. 
High school coaches will coor- 
dinate the sessions and high 
school athletes will assist and 
coach the league teams. 

A 7-on-7 touch football camp 
will be offered June 27- July 21 at 
Central Park, Monday through 
Thursday. 

There will not be camp July 4- 
8. Sixth through eighth graders 
will meet from 12:15 - 2 p.m. 

Cost for basketball is $30, $45 
out-of-district; football cost is 
$25, $40 out-of-district. 

For more information, con- 
tact Greg Groth at 223-8621. 



Antioch offers hoops camps 



Antioch Community High 
School will be offering two sets of 
basketball camps for boys this 
summer. 

The first session will be June 
13-16th for incoming ninth and 
10th graders and will be held at 
ACHS. Class will meet from 4 to 6 
p.m. Cost is $30. 

A second camp will be held 
July 11-13 and 18-21. This camp 
will be for incoming fifth through 



eighth graders. Fifth and sixth 
grade will meet from 9 to 10:30 
a.m. Seventh and eighth grade 
from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. 

Participants may enroll for 
one or two weeks. Cost is $40 for 
two weeks, $25 for one week. 

Camp registration forms arc 
available at Antioch area grade 
schools. 

For more information, call 
Dresser at 395-1421. 



K..H. Kim's Tae Kwon Do 

Libertyville/Miradelein 




"Spring is the time to 
begin shaping up for 

summer" 

• Tae Kwon Do Classes 7 Days a 
Week DayB & Evenings 

• Classes for children age 5 
through Adults 

• Family & Group discounts available 



Susan Trahan scored 3 goals 
Monday but did not have a 
chance to sec the fruits of her nor 
her team's efforts. 

For Trahan was being 
checked for a nasty spill she took 
at the end of the first half, when 
Mundclcin led Grayslakc 4-0, The 
Mustangs went on to win the. 
non-confcrcncc match 5-1. 

"She got hurt at the end of the 
first half, but she really shiot 
well," Mundclcin Coach Dave 
Eckstrom said. 

There is neary a senior on the 
Mundclein roster this year, and 
the goal keeper is a freshmen, but 
Mundclcin is 7-1. 
. "It is surprising wc have come 
along this far," Eckstrom said. 

In addition' to Trahan's 3 
goals, Anita Kovalik scored and 
had an assist and Andrea Und- 
strom scored. 

Recording assists were: Laura 
Dijoscph, Nicole Stonccipher, 
Tracy Johnson and Missy Little. 

Frosh goalkeeper Lesley Wal- 
ton stopped all Grayslakc shots 
until the match's final minute. 

"The bihggest thing is adjust- 
ing to the level of play," Eckstrom 
said of the frosh goalie on the var- 
sity. 

Laurie Olson scored off a cor- 
ner kick with 44 seconds for 
Grayslakc (3-6). 

The Rams did have Stephanie 
Smith back in the lineup, but 
Chcnoa Chebny, a scoring threat, 
was held in check by Mundclcin. 

"She had three to five girls on 
her," Grayslakc Coach Joe Mar- 
tinez said. 

"Mundclcin is not as tough as 



last year, but they beat us on 
speed and aggressiveness," 
Martinez said. 

The Rams lost to Highland 
Park 3-1. 

Elsewhere on Monday, Wau- 
conda shutout Lake Geneva 3-0. 
Tina Homer scored twice and 
Becky Stcvig once. 

Lake Zurich edged Crystal 



Lake South 4-3 In the Fox Valley 
Conference. Jackie Baslcr, VJckl 
Vassallo and Angela Scitz scored 
in an overtime thriller. Dec Dec 
Rubens scored the key regulation 
goal for the Bears (7-3, 6-1). 

Grayslakc hosts Wauconda 
May 9 in Northwest Suburban 
Conference play. Mundclcin is at 
Llbcrtyvillc May 12 for a key 
North Suburban Conference tilt. 



*-.• 



• One Month 's Lessons and Uniform 

with a paid membership of 6 mos. or more (new members only) 

TAI CHI CH'UAN & YOGA 

Classes Available Now • Please Call For Information 

1175 Park Ave., Libertyville • /?f. 1 76 & Butterfield 91 0" 9322 



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Perfect form 

Timmy Walker, a black beft in tae kwon do, displays his 
perfect forms during the Midwest Cup Championships 
held at Antioch High School. Walker earned a first 
place in forms and a second place In fighting. More 
than 400 Juniors and adults from across the Midwest 
participated in the event.— Photo by Bill Carey 




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ANTIOCH FAMILY SPORT CENTER 

& T-SHIRT SHOP 

893 MAIN ST. ANTIOCH 

(LOOK FOR THE BLUE BUILDING ACROSS FROM ANTIOCH SCHWINN) 

395-5584 

ONE BLOCK NORTH OF BJ's (call for directions) 



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MON107 

TUES.WED.THURS, 

FRI. 10-6:30 

SAT 9-4; Sun. 10-2 




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Rick 

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victii 
Ram 
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day. 

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ball 
tryii 
De\ 
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Max 6, 1994 UIccIan<I Newspapers COMMUNITY 




Freshmen duo 



[ffforts of Graysiake's second 
doubles team of Chris Wirsing 
and Josh Shipley arc beginning to 
turn more and more heads in the. 
Northwest Suburban Confer- 
ence, 

"They just dig, dig and dig. 
They're good," Johnsburg coach 
Rick Bailey said. 

The Skyhawks arc the latest 
victim of the freshmen duo. The 
Rams .tandem ran their record to 
7-0 in conference with a 6-0, 6-2 
domination of Johnsburg Mon- 
day. 

"The two little guys barely 
beat them at Johnsburg, but 




Rams 



crushed them here. It is confi- 
dence/' Rams Coach Paul Keller 
said. 

Grayslakc continued to close 
in on the NWSC title with a 4-1 
win. The win improved Grayslakc 
to 0-0 in the NWSC, 9-3 overall. 
The conference meet May 11 at 
Round Lake could be just a for- 
mality. 

"They're the best team In the 
conference. They have quality 
players," Bailey said, "The rest of 
us arc just killing each other off." 

In singles, Carey Radcbaugh 
won at No. 1 over Doug Schaefcr 
6-2, 7-6 (10-8). Eric Gardiner, 



who lost to Brandon Gough last 
time, won 6-3, 6-1. 

Pete Ncubcrgcr won his 
eighth match at No. 3 singles witii 
a 6-0, 6-2 win over Phil Brito. 

Johnsburg's win came at first 
doubles, a 6-2, 6-3 win by Chris 
Dohrn and Andy Lyman over 
Christian Favrc and Paul Rocck. 

Johnsburg, who downed 
Wauconda 3-2 to earn a split in 
that series, is 5-5, 4-4 NWSC. 

"I found a lineup that I think 
will work," Bailey said. 

Grayslakc has found a dou- 
bles team that is expected to be a 
force for three more years. 



Sequoit sofiball rally tops Warren 



In one of the, more exciting 
games of the year, the Antioch 
High School junior varsity soft- 
bail team spent an entire game 
trying to catch the, Warren Blue 
Devils and were finally successful 
with a 3 -run rally in the bottom of 
the seventh inning. 

After Jedele Sosnowski 
opened the inning with a single 
and Laura Deutsch walked, Joann 
Jedele doubled home the first 
run. 

Sarah Rockow walked and 
both base runners advanced on a 
wild pitch. Courtney Konrath was 
safe on an attempted safety 
squeeze bunt to load the bases. 

With two out, freshman 
catcher Linda DeSalvo then sin- 



gled home the winning run to 
seal a 15-14 victory for the Lady 
Sequoits. 

Lisa Murphy and deutsch 
combined pitching efforts for the 
win. Players with two hits in the 
game included DeSalvo (triple), 
Konrath, Ellen Manderschcid, 
Jessica Schmitt and Sosnowski. 

The theme for the games 
played earlier last week appeared 
to be "swinging" in the rain as a 
down pour and lightning abrupt- 
ly ended the Antioch-Waukegan 
game with the score tied 15-15. 
With the seventh inning unable 
to be completed, the final result 
of the six-inning contest gives 
Waukegan the 15-14 victory. 

Leading the 13 -hit Sequoit 



'■■ v» -/v. '.-'-■■ ;';-'^. •'.,;■■; ■■•^: 

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* 



soccer 
teams winl. lose twice 

The Undenhurst boys' soccer teams had a mixed bag of 
results last weekend. "'".»." 

Lazers 

The Lazers (under 1 4) took their first loss of the season in a 
rugged match against the American Eagles of Qendale Heights. 

Multiple yellow cards were issued to the Eagles during the 
game, but the Lazers came up short by a score of 3-2. 

Undenhurst goals were scored by Tim Chilcote and Rob 
Smith with assists by Andrew Donrman and Cameron Marshall 

Goalkeeper Mike Szukala put on a credible performance 
defending the net. The Lazers record Is now 2-1. 

Lightning 

Hie Undenhurst Lightning (under 1 2) shutout their bppo - 
hent for their ^ third time in a row. 

The 3-6 victory over the Fox Valley Kickers in Aurora fea- 
tured great defense by Jon Mendeike, Josh Boiler, Mark 
Sanderson and Matt Nolan, with Nick Placko in goal. 

Scoring goals for Undenhurst were Quinn Gooch, Scott 
Bender and Peter Gedvilas, assisted by Keli Owens and Jay 
Sturt.;': it ..-.V- / fe:i;S<:-;; : '^ ; .: 'S^SS^S 

and have allowed! none to be scored against them. , 

Royal Eagles 

The Royal Eagles (under 10) also played trie Fox Valley 
Kickers in Aurora. ( - 

The first half was evenly played with a halftime score of 2-2 
on Undenhurst goals by Ryan Jordan; assisted by Kevin 
Mathewson, and Adam Placko, assisted by Nate Rimkus. 

Fox Valley pulled ahead in the second half for a 4-2 win. 
Ramesh Kumar and Kaleb Barrett also had outstanding games 
for the. Eagles ; - 



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attack was Konrath with three 
hits -including a grand-slam 
homer. Schmitt (single and triple) 
and Deutsch each had two hits. 

Katie Cox, Jedele, Sarah 
Rockow and Megan Sosnowski 
each hit safely in the game. 
Deutsch pitched the distance 
with three walks and a strikeout 

In another game shortened by 
rain, the Lady Sequoits found 
themselves trailing Warren after 
four innings by a score of 19-5 
and having allowed only four hits. 

A generous supply of fielding 
errors and walks along with time- 
ly hitting helped the Blue Devils 
to a commanding lead. 

The junior varsity team is cur- 
rently 4-11-1. 




Grayslako's Car ©y Radebaugh follows through ono of hb volleys 
that earned him the No. 1 singles match over Johnsburg, 6-2 and 
7-6,— Photo by Mil Dermody Jr. 



Kazlausky's bid for one more season 



STEVE PETERSON 
* Staff Reporter- *- • -* " 

Fritz Kazlausky was not cele- 
brating Grant High's 7-5 win over 
Round Lake Friday in Northwest 
Suburban Conference play. 

At least not as much as usual. 

Kazlausky was planning to 
retire as a teacher after more than 
30 years at the Fox Lake school, 
but had asked for one more year 
as baseball coach. Instead, some- 
one new will be guiding the 
Bulldogs for the first time in three 
decades. 

"I am very bitter," Kazlausky 
said. "It was a loyalty thing with 
them." 

Kazlausky has more than 400 
wins to his credit, and seven 
NWSC league titles. An eighth is a 



realistic goal with his team's 7-1 
record. He is in the Illinois 
Baseball Coaches Hail of Fame. 

Kazlausky noted his work 
with the diamond and his 33 
years of service. 

"We have certain expectations 
of- the position," Paul lakstas, 
Grant High board president, said. 

"Fritz did a superb job in both 
basketball and baseball," he 
added. Kazlausky coached 
sophomore basketball. 

One issue was a lack of a sum- 
mer baseball program, according 
to Jakstas. School officials had 
not pressured Kazlausky into 
reviving the program, which 
faded after the death of Leo 
Garrcttscn several years ago. 

Jakstas said Kazlausky told 



the board of his retirement plans, 
then asked to be reinstated as 
baseball coach. Kazlausky will be 
one of more than 10 coaches tak- 
ing advantage of the* state's "5 
Plus 5" retirement package. 
Others include girls basketball 
coach John Schad. 

Kazlausky said he was tojd by 

school board members they 

would back him but he would 

- have to go through the applica- 

tion procedure. 

» Kazlausky said he had no idea 
his request for another year 
coaching baseball would not be 
approved. 

Other schools in the confer- 
ence do have retired teachers 
coaching. Paul Keller at Grayslake 
guides the boys tennis program. 



It was a long trip to Orland 
Park for the Undenhurst Power 
(under 13) but worth it, as the 
Power beat the Mighty Mites in a 
6-0 blow out. 

Jenny Barbcra and Kristina 
Giangiorgi combined for the 



shut-out in goal with the help of 
strong defensive play from Jenny 
Porter, Esther Scheurer and 
Amber DcWald. 

The Power goals were scored 
by Jamie Wismcr (two), Kristcn 



Garni in (two), Jourdan Phillips 
(one), and Maureen Moran (one). 
Assisting on the goals were 
Sarah Richardson (two), Phillips 
(one), and Cara Robinson (one). 
The Power improved their record 
to 2-1. 





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Q J Only $1.00 A Dozen When You Bring Your Own Container 

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Splnnar BaKa Reg. $1.79 WMLM MICI ••e 

Original Super Yummlea 




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Long trip pays off for Power in 6-0 blow out 







- 




COMMUNITY LaIceIancI Newspapers M*y 6, 1994 



k 






if.* 







NEW CONSTRUCTION... 
Spring Grove 

3 bedroom raised ranch on an acre of 
wooded hillside property. Oak cabinet 
kitchen, oak trim. 1 1/2 baths, master, 
bath, overlooking Nippcrslnk Creek. 

Listed at $ 1 69,900 

Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 




GRAYSLAKE... 

3 bedroom quad-level, large master suite, 
. 2 full & 1 1/2 baths, brick fireplace in 
family room, cathedral ceilings in dining 
room & living room. Screened deck 
overlooking pond, basement & extra 
large garage for storage. Located on a 
quiet cul-de-sac near town. 

Listed at* 169,900 
Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 



EXCELLENT 

INVESTMENT UNDER 

•70,000 

This Cape Cod style home features 
| remodeled bath & kitchen, laundry 
room, new carpeting, 1 00 amp electric, 
cement driveway, 1 & 1/2 car garage. 
Close to schools and parks. 

Reduced to $ 67,900 
Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 




ANTIOCH... CHAIN 
WATER RIGHTS 

3 bedroom ranch with 1 & 1/2 baths, 
wood floors, remodeled kitchen, family 
room with wood-burning stove, large 
fenced yard, garage, paved drive, plus.. .a 
24 x 32 room waiting for your touches. 

Listed at $ 1 04,900 
Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 




THANKS 




FOR ALL YOU'VE DONE 

'AND THANKS TO ALL THE 

MOMS WHO HAVE HELPED 

MAKE MY REAL ESTATE 

CAREER SUCCESSFUL 



HAPPY MOTHERS 

DAY 



GIVE THAT SPECIAL "MOM" A NEW HOME FOR 

MOTHER'S DAY 




Mike Culat, GRI 

GRADUATE REALTORS INSTITUTE 
ACCREDITED BUYERS REPRESENTATIVE 

LICENSED IN ILLINOIS & WISCONSIN 
RE/MAX AWARD WINNER 1991, 1992, 1993 

CALL 838-MIKE 
OR PAGER 626-2121 



i i 



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CHANNEL FRONT 
A-FRAME... 

2 bedrooms, sliders to decks in front & 
back. Full basement, attached 2 & 1/2 
car garage, all on a half-acre of 
Chain-O-Lakes Channel Front. 

Just Listed at 

*1 19,900 

Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 



NEW LISTING 

Cedar log home on 2 & 1/2 wooded 
lots, 2 bedrooms, living room with 
stone fireplace, remodeled bath, new 
carpeting, huge family room with 
vaulted ceiling, 2 & 1/2 car garage. 
Great corner location with city sewer. 

Just listed at *82,900 

CaU Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 
for private showing 




NEW LISTING 

2 bedroom ranch with 1,000 sq. ft. of 
living space. Fresh paint, new carpet, 
1 & 1/2 car garage, cement drive, nice 
yard. Water rights 3 blocks away. 

0niy*62»900 

Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 
For exclusive showing. 



■ 7 CONTRACT SALE or RENT 
WITH OPTION TO BUY 

Over an acre of riverfront property with 3 
bedroom home, fantastic views of open 
space, fenced - wooded yard. Large 
kitchen, dining room, large living room 
with fireplace, 2 & 1/2 car garage. 

Listed at *72 f 900 

Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 
for details 




Call Mike Culat 



RE^ISC 



Advantage Realty 

532 W. Lake St. Antloch, IL 

(708)395-3 



III 



(ext. 134) 



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Ma? 6, Iff 4 UkelANd Newspapers COMMUNITY, 





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COMMUNITY UUeIancI Newsp/vpers May 6> 1994 




WIJ COMM UNITY LAketANci Newspapers w» y q, » "- . ■ 

Front Row Seats. On Sale May 6th. 







SCHWINN MOAB SS 
reg. '499*— sate '429" 



Established 1895. 



It' Hi 





SCHWINN IMPACT 
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Re-Established 1994: 



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HIT THE 
TRAIL SALE 




CROSS FLIGHT/LITTLE FLIGHT 
reg. il9.99J*32.00-sale '29.99S24.99 



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ANTIOCH 

CYCLING AND FITNr^ 




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reg. *39.99—saU '29.99 




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Antioch, II 

395-6500 

Open Monday 12-7; Closed Wed. 

Tues.rfhursVFri. 10-7 

Sat. 9-5„Sun. 10-2 





. 






I 



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Max 6, 1 994 La^Ianc! Newspapers COUNTY 



LaIce CouiNiy Issue&ch 




PUBLIC LIBRARV DISTRICT 

Coroner's report sh*&S increase in 



— 




MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

The Lake County Coroner's 
annual report is out showing a 
136 percent increase in overdos- 
es. The report showed an over all 
increase in the coroner's case- 
load of 7 percent 

Twenty-six cases in 1993 were 
the direct result of drug abuse. 
Most of the cases, surprisingly fell 
within the 31 to 59 age range and 
the victims were predominantly 
male. . 

Cocaine was the leading fac- 



tor' in these drug overdoses. Of 
the 26 overdoses in the county, 19 
were ruled to* be accidental and 
two were attributed to suicide. 
Furthermore, cocaine was also 
implicated in five traffic deaths in 
the county. Cocaine was also 
found to be a factor in one homi- 
cide victim. 

Last year, only 1 1 county 
deaths were related to drug over- 
dose. However, in 1991 there 
were 23 deaths attributed to over- 
doses. 

Drowning increased by 60 



percent from last year with alco- 
hol and for drugs present in three 
of the victims, The peak month 
for drowning was July and most 
of them occurred while the vic- 
tims were swimming. The bulk of 
the drowning victims were young 
people from birth to age 30. 

The best news from the report 
was that there were rio fire relat- 
ed fatalities in 1993. This was 
only year since 19/14 that there 
has not been any fire related 
deaths. In 1992, there were seven 
fire victims and in 1991, six. 



Homicides in Lake County arc ■ 
down with 24 reported in 1993. 
This is a reduction of 1 from those 
in 1992. Most of the homicides 
committed in Lake County were 
vehicular or by handgun and the 
victims were predominantly 
under the age of 30. The peak 
month for homicides in 1993 was 
in September. 

There wcrc.a total of 50 vehic- 
ular deaths in 1993. Forty-seven 
were ruled accidental, eight were . 
ruled homicide, and three were 
ruled undetermined. Most of the 



victims of vehicular deaths were 
the drivers of the automobiles 
and most were age 21 to 30. The 
peak time of these deaths in 1993 
were in September, with January 
and July running a close second. 
The number of impaired drivers 
Involved In fatal traffic accidents 
was 19. Traffic fatalities were up 
Ifl percent from 1992. 

Twelve deaths in 1993 were 
ruled as being of an undeter- 
mined nature. This represents an 
increase of 9 percent, from the 
previous year. 



COUNTY 



/ 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



THIS WEEK 

Editorial 

Choice offered for 
school tax. PAGE B8 




Governor talk 

Edgar boasts of 
progress at Republican 
Federation dinner. 
PAGE B4 




Comeback 

Doug and Bonnie 
Miller, founders of the 
Adler Cultural Center 
return for folk concert. 
PAGE Bl 1 

Good Beginnings 

Help available for work- 
ing parents. 
PAGE BIO 

Life's A Bear 

Tribute to mom on her 
day. PAGE Bl 5 

Green Up 

Botanic Garden offers 
Ups. PAGE B28 



Offers reward for theft of mated nesting swans 



BILL SCHROEDER 
Publisher 

A two-county alert has been 
sounded for, persistent thieves 
who stole two separate batches of 
swan eggs and then returned to 
steal a pair of nesting swans and a 
third batch of eggs. 

Owners of the swans, . the 
McAllister Equipment Co., Volo, 
have posted a $1,000 reward for 
information leading to the arrest 
and conviction of the thieves. 

Authorities in both Lake and 
McHenry counties, plus the 
Illinois Conservation Dcpt, were 
notified of the disappearance of 
the mated pair which made a 
home on a pond located on the 
grounds of the heavy equipment 
sales company for four years. 

"We know two persons were 
involved because we saw two sets 
of footprints on the shore line," 
reported Gary Jones, branch 
manager. 

Jones said it would take at 
least two persons to steal me 
large waterfowl. "Swans arc very 
strong, powerful enough to break 
a person's arm if not handled 
properly." 

The pair was taken overnight 



April 28, sometime before the 
sales office opened at 6:30 a.m. 
Friday. 

The equipment company is 
located in a rural area off Fox 
Lakc-Volo Rd. 

The Swans were acquired by 
Gene Harris, owner of the com- 
pany, to beautify the. placid pond 
setting and serve as deterrents to 
flocks of geese that have become 
nuisances in suburban areas. 

That might be the reason for 
the theft, Jones theorized, or the 
fact that adult swans can bring up 
to $1,500 each on the open mar- 
ket. 

"Our swans were protective of 
their surroundings. Last year, 
they hatched two cygnets, but wc 
had to remove them last fall, 
because they didn't get along 
with their parents," Jones stated. 

Three eggs were stolen from a 
shoreline hutch earlier this 
spring, according to Jones. Later 
a setting of two eggs were stolen, 
probably by the same thieves 
who got both swans and the eggs 
in a third attempt. 

Jones said the swans were pin- 
ioned, which means that they 
can't fly. 















Tho matod swans swim wlfh two of their cygnets on the pond at 
McAllister Equipment Co., In Volo. Owners of tft© swans are offer- 
ing a $1,000 reward for Information leading to the arrest and con- 
viction of thieves responsible two separate batches of swans eggs 
as well as the nesting pair from their habitat.— Photo courtesy of 
McAllister Equipment 

Thc : swans were not pets or lets. They also foraged in the 

considered domesticated. "They pond. 

would come up for feed, but you Jones said McAllister cmploy- 

couldn't touch them or pet ces hope the swans haven't been 

them," Jones said. The swans harmed. He said they can be 

were fed shell corn and duck pel- identified. 



Political action group pleased with election 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

Members of the Lake County 
Conservation Alliance arc very 
pleased with the outcome of the 
primary election last April. 
"We worked hard to help 'green- 
up' county government," said 
Mary Wade, chairperson of the 
group. "With all of the media 
attention paid to our success this 
past month, people have been 
coming out of the woodwork to 
Join LCCA." 

LCCA rated candidates based 
on their voting records on key 
environmental issues. The April 
primary marked the group's first 
effort to be involved with county 
politics. In future elections, they 
will survey challengers to deter- 
mine who should be endorsed. 

"In tliis primary election, Lake 
County residents showed they've 
had it with the ever-increasing 
property taxes, traffic gridlock, 
overcrowded school, and other 
problems caused by over devel- 
opment," explains Wade, "LCCA- 
PC has shown that if people join 
together to fight back, wc can 



have tremendous impact." According to LCCA, Calabrcsa for conservation throughout her 

The group endorsed Carol earned a 100 percent rating by seven years on County Board." 
Calabrcsa of Libcrtyvillc. the group for her "strong voice See GROUP page B2 




Golfing for youths 

Former Chicago Bear Jim Morrissey swaps golfing stories with Colin McRae, president of the 
Lake County Forest Preserve and Chicago Bear players Jim Schwantz and Tom Waddle during 
a kick-off event for Ihe Celebrity Golf Course Outing. The event will raise money for the Youth 
Conservation Corps and Is slated for June 15 In Mundeleln.— Photo by Gene Gabry 






ij 









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COUNTY UkclANtl Newspapers MAy 6, 1994 




early 25 years ago, on September 25, 1969 the College of Lake County opened its doors to students for the first time. 
Although this day marked an important beginning, we know the work that led to that day started at least 17 years earlier. 

Many people in Lake County deserve credit for having the vision to see the needs which could be met by a local community 
college. A smaller number of those people worked actively to turn that vision into reality. They spoke at community meetings, 
passed petitions, wrote editorials and talked endlessly to friends and neighbors about what a college could do for Lake County. 
All this they did as volunteers. 

their work has made it possible for over 300,000 students to attend CLC over the past 24 years. As we turn 25 this fall, we 
want to make sure these early friends of the college are recognized. 

In a perfect world, the college would have a complete record of these people and their contributions. Reality falls a little short 
of that. We have scanned all the written records (news clips, early correspondence, minutes of meetings, etc.) and assembled 
this list of volunteers and the roles they played on behalf of the college. 



Hul v\c need \our help to complete il. 



If you were in Lake County 25-40 years ago, think back. Whose names do you associate with the effort to start a college? 
Your next door neighbor's? Your high school teacher's? Your own? 

If you can add names to our list, please call. Even if those people you remember have since passed away. We want this list io 
last beyond the celebration of our 25th. We want it to serve as a permanent record of the important volunteer service these 
early friends performed. , .»-> < 

One more thing, we also need help finding some of you on this list so we can invite your participation in the anniversary 
celebration. If you are on this list, but have been out of touch with the college, please call and let us know where you are! 
You know how bad it feels to lose track of a friend. Don't let us lose you! 



C 



all Dorothy Drake today at 

708-223-6601, ext.4640 



At this time of year, the college traditionally thanks the 
many volunteers who work to keep us vital. This year, 
we'd also like to offer special thanks to the volunteers 
who got us started. We need you all. 



SUCCESS STORIES WRITTEN. HERE 

College of Lake County 
Twenty Fifth Anniversary 

1969-1994 




These people helped get the college started! 

Dr. Jack Adams • Dr. R.M. Adelman • Sister Agnes Marie • (Mr.) Anderson • A. Harold Anderson • Ralph Anderson • Jim 
Andrews • Donald T. Asher • Mrs. Phyllis E. Ball • C. Alan Baske • G. Beaubien • Kenneth Becker • Norman Benson • 
Morris Benzuly • William Boerner • Howard Bonner • Jean Borendame • Dr. William Bourke • Paul W. Brandel • Louis W. 
Brydges • Fred Burgess • Jay Burgess • Paul Burke • George Bury • Red Carrison • A.B. Casey • John Cesinger • John 
Chaloupkas • John Clark • Roy Coughie • Mrs. Marie Costello • Robert E. Coulson • Oby Cowan • John Crutcher • Mrs. 
Ethel Damerow • Marvin Danielson • Warren T. Davis • George L. Davison • Dr. Lawrence D. Day • Mr. Denman • John 
Devlin • Albert L. Dittman • Robert Doebler • Ben Donaldson • • Cindy Drabant • Mrs. Albert Dunham • Edwin Ellis • 
James Flood • C. Joseph. Foley • Ray Forehand • Mrs. Jean Frank • Dr. Howard Fricke • Elmer W. Freytag • Ray Gassier • 
Leslie P. Gilmore • Sig Gissler • Ruth Gregory • Mike Gulan • Russell Gwaltney • Lester J. Harman • Mrs. Margaret Harris 
• William Hartnett • Ruth Hawthorne • Sister Helen Marie, S.Sp.S. • Alvin Heppner • W. E. Herbster • Kenneth Heuef • 
Walter Heunann • Mrs. Elizabeth Hewitt • John Hildebrandt • Kathy Hoepner • V. Joseph Hultman • David Ingram • Don 
Isleib • Edmund Jakaltis • Norman Jedele • Frank Johnson • Walter R. Johnson • Robert Jones • Roy Jones • Sister 
Julianne • F. Ward Just • Merle Kauffman • Richard F. Kennedy • Verne Kennedy • Sam Korcovelos • Walter Kroll* Henry 
Krumrey • Ed Kurek • Stoddard Lane • George H. Lawton • Keith C. Leech • Floyd Lewis • William T. Loblaw • James 
Lonergan * Mrs. Barbara Lowy • F. James Lumber • Mrs. Walter Lyons • Robert MacGruder • Thomas Mann • John S. 
Matejevlch • Dr. Walter McCallum • J. Douglas McNeill • John Meade • James Milne • Frank Mlnnerly • Irv Moody • 
Percy Moran • Boyd Mulder • Mark Nagel • Charles E. Neal • Ira Nlederman • Melvin Nyman • Edward Palo • Theodore E. 
Paxton • H. W. Pearce • Ann Perettl • Esper A. Petersen •Dr. W. C. Petty • Al Plckus • Rodger Pitstick • Frank Potter • 
Clarence E. Prichard • Eugene Rawhoof • William Rose • Larry Rouse • Dr. Theodore Rozema • Thelma Sandee • A. A. 
Savel • Mrs. Joseph Schabowlca • Mrs. Frank Schlro • William Schwandt • Karl Schreiber • William Schroeder • Mrs. 
Lola Sears • Eugene Sell • Clinton Sherman • William D. Smart • Howard Smucker • Isabel Smythe • Mary Sroka • Fred 
Stahmer • Myron Steinberg • Dr. Victor Steiner •Vernon Stretch • Mr. Tomkovlch • M. B. Turner • Richard Vevle • Mrs. 
Herbert Verplancken • Larry Vulllemot • Alexander Wasnlewski • D. A. Watts • Mrs. Delbert Weller • Herbert L. Wesner • 
Robert F. Williams • Robert Wright • Mrs. Florence Zeman 



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Max 6,1 ??4 UtcfUNd NewspApcRS COUNTY 





UICE 

CouNiy 



Former chief sues village 

ROUND LAKE BEACH— Richard Jablonski, fired 
police chief, is suing the village for the final three years 
and two months on his contract. The amount is 
$154,000 and legal costs. He feels he Was wrongfully 
fired. He said he believes the village fired him for mak- 
ing a public statement against two trustees. 

Drivers reject contractor jobs 

ANTIOCH— At this time, none of the Antioch 
Community High School bus drivers Have accepted, 
jobs with Laidlaw, the contractor selected by the 
school board to provide transportation for the high 
school for the next three years. Low pay and the dri- 
ving distance have been cited as the reasons for failure 
of the drivers tv consider the jobs. "We can't afford to 
work for them," said driver Marge Soulc. "After we pay 
for gasoline and taxes, wc would have no money left." 

Welton answers critics 

GURNEE— Gurnee Mayor Richard Welton has 
responded to a political activists group's full-page 
advertisement in last week's Lakeland Newspapers. 
The advertisement, paid for by Guriiec Residents 
Action Committee, described Welton as "a full time 
grocer and part-time mayor." "Most mayors in Lake 
County are part-time," Welton said Monday. "1 don't 
know what their point is. In order to get qualified peo- 
ple to run for office, it is important that the position be 
part-time so they do not have to give up their careers." 



Judge's decision favors Korhumel 

WAUKECAN— A 19th Circuit Judge overturned the 
Lake County Board's unanimous decision to reject 
Newton Korhumcl's plans to build a 1 million sq. ft. 
office and research complex near the Toll way and Rtc. 
60. In his decision to allow Korhumel to build a six-story 
office and research complex, Circuit Judge Stephen 
Walter ruled that "the property takes Its character from 
the tollway." Across Rtc. GO, W.W. Grainger Inc. has 
hopes of gaining the Lake County Board's approval to 
rezonc part of Us property urban to allow the equipment 
and components distributing company to build a 
national headquarters. Grainger officials have been 
arguing all along before the Lake County Zoning Board 
of Appeals that its urban zoning request is appropriate 
because of its proximity to the to 1 1 way. 

Two youths arrested for porn 

LINCOLNSHIRE— A 14-ycar-old and a 15-ycar-old 
were arrested April 1 1 for selling pornographic videos and 
magazines to students at Stevenson High School. 
According to Lincolnshire police, the 14-ycar-old paid 
adults to buy the material from an adult store in Arlington 
Heights. The 14-ycar-old sold the material for as high as 
$300 for the videos and $100 for the magazines. The 15- 
ycar-old was the "number one customer" who would 
then resell the material to students at Stevenson High 
School. Both juveniles were petitioned to the Lake 
County juvenile court and face possible charges of 
obscenity and possession of harmful materials. 

Village to examine plan 

MUNDELEIN— Mayor Marilyn Sindlcs is talking with 
village board members about the advisability of updat- 
ing the comprehensive plan. With all of the new devel- 
opment activity along the northern and western bound- 
aries of the village, she feels some direction is needed on 
zoning and annexation decisions. If board members 
agree the plan needs to be updated, they will meet with 
the planning consultant prior to holding public hearings 
on the proposals. 

Board rezones area 

ANTIOCH— The Village Board of Antioch made the 
difficult decision Monday night to rezonc the north side 
of Ida Street from R-5 to R-3. The decision was difficult 
because, despite a majority of residents requesting the 
change, in order to avoid spot zoning, two were rczoncd 
against their owners wishes. The rczoning encom- 
passed 12 properties from 257 to 327 Ida. Eight of the 
homeowners had petitioned the board for the change. 



Chemical company may move 

LAKE ZURICH— The newly elected president of one 
of the biggest homeowners associations in the village 
told board members they did not want a proposed 
chemical blending company to relocate next to the sub- 
division and across the street from a church and school 
at the corner of Main St. and Bucsching Road. Ardrox, 
Inc., an international corporation, supplies chemical * 
cleaning solutions for airlines to use in rest rooms and 
for cleaning metals In preparation for painting. They arc 
requesting to relocate from Lake Bluff and another 
building in unincorporated Libcrtyvillc. A public hear- 
ing before the plan commission has been scheduled for 
June 1. Village officials said they were investigating the 
company and its chemicals. 

Savage found guilty by jury 

WAUCONDA— Gail Savage was found innocent of 
murder but guilty of involuntary manslaughter and reck- 
less conduct in the smothering death of her five-month- 
old daughter Cynthia in June 1993. A Lake County jury 
found her confession to be valid but apparently took 
into consideration her remorse and inadequate thought 
process at times due to her low IQ. She now faces a May 
31 hearing where she could be sentenced to between 2 
to 10 years, much less than the 20 to 60 years prosecu- 
tors had wanted. She was scheduled to appear in court 
May 4 to have a date set for her next trial in the death of 
one of her two other infants who had been presumed to 
die of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. A settlement 
k which would have her plead guilty to an identical verdict 
for the death of Michael in 1990 and Amber in 1992 is a 
possibility, with her terms being served concurrently. 

Variety show comes to town 

FOX LAKE— Don't miss out on Big Hollow School's . 
14th annual Variety Show. The event, sponsored by the 
Big Hollow PTO, will take place on May 6 at 7 p.m. in the 
Grant Community High School auditorium. About 40 
acts arc expected featuring 90 students from grades K 
through 8th. Besides performing, students will also partic- 
ipate in lighting, decorations, and putting acts together. 

Businesses form group 

GRAYSLAKE — Downtown Gray slake businesses are. 
in the process of forming an organization, naming it the 
Downtown Merchants Association. The Association will 
hire a manager using funds from a special tax assess- 
ment The mission of the group is to encourage consist 
tent improvements, stability, quality, and economic 
growth for the downtown district. 



Arbitration 
program is 
expanded 

MARY FOLEY ____ 

Staff Reporter 

The Civil Division for Lake 
County has announced the 
expansion of the mandatory 
court-annexed arbitration pro- 
gram. The expansion will now 
include cases seeking money 
damages between $15,000 and 
$30,000. 

Formerly, the program had 
been limited to cases seeking 
money damages between $2,500 
and $15,000. 

Mandatory court annexed arbi- 
tration is used across the country. 
The court refers civil cases involv- 
ing a specified dollar amount to a 
panel of three arbitrators. 

Arbitrators, who arc lawyers 
meeting certain criteria and who 
have been trained and certified, 
hear evidence under simplified 
procedures and then issue non- 
binding decisions. 

The arbitrators have all volun- 
teered to participate in the pro- 
gram and receive a small reim- 
bursement from the State of 
Illinois. Currently, there arc 400 
arbitrators in Lake County. 

x The former arbitration pro- 
gram was limited to cases seeking 
money damages of between 
$2,500 and $15,000. Under new 
legislation, Lake County was per- 
mitted to request an increase in 
the eligibility limit upon approval 
of the Illinois Supreme Court. 




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i fi COUNTY UkElANcl Newspapers M*y 6, 1994 

Edgar, Gingrich address county GOP, look to future 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

Congressman Newt Gingrich, 
the House Republican Whip, 
gave the keynote address at the 
annual Lake County Republican 
Federation dinner. Gingrich 
was introduced by Governor Jim 
Edgar. 

The dinner was held at the 
racquetball club at Marriott's 
Lincolnshire Resort, April 30. 
After cocktails and dinner, 
David Crouse the dinner 
chairman, began the program. 

Crouse, after welcoming all 
the GOP luminaries and 
precinct committeemen, asked 
for a moment to remember 
former President Richard Nixon. 
He then introduced Edgar. 

"He saved us tens of millions 
of dollars with his tax cap," said 
Crouse. "Governor, we thank 
you for that." 

"I am delighted to say to you, 
as the governor of this state, we 
have a lot to be proud of," Edgar 
told the audience. "For the last 
five months, the Illinois 
employment rate has run below 
the national average." 

Edgar went on to discuss the 
increase in manufacturing in 
Illinois. He especially noted the 
decision by Motorola to build 
new facilities in Harvard. "Here 
in Illinois, I think we are doing 
something right," said Edgar. 
"These developments did not 
happen by accident. 

"Is everything perfect in 
. Illinois?", Edgar continued. 



"But give me a few more 
Republicans..." 

Then, it was on to the main 
speaker, Gingrich. Gingrich first 
joked it was the first time* he had 
ever given an address on a 
tennis court. He then went on to 
discuss some of the changes he 
anticipates for America. 

"There are three great 
changes that are coming down 
the road," explained Gingrich. 
"Three that will change our 
lives." 

The first, according to 
Gingrich, is the rise of the 
information age. "This is a 
revolution in information," he 
said. "...It wilt be a dramatically 
different experience of life.* 1 

Then next change, predicted 
Gingrich, will be the rise of the 
world market. "What it means to 
us is that the price of labor in our 
lifetime will be set in South 
China," said Gingrich. 

He explained to the audience 
how in 1948 the United States 
had no real competition but as 
Japan and Germany were able to 
rebuild, the major industries in 
America became challenged by 
world competition. 

"We are going to^have to be 
more competitive," said 
Gingrich. "We have a big 
challenge ahead of us." 
Gingrich went on to warn the 
audience that despite U.S. 
participation in the United 
Nations, NAFTA, and other 
world treaties, we need to keep 
America's interests in focus. 



The third challenge facing 
America today, according to 
Gingrich, is the loss of 
civilization. "It is impossible to 
maintain .our civilization when 
12-year-olds have babies, when 
15-year-olds kill, when 17 year- 
olds get AIDS, and 18-year-olds 
get their diplomas and cannot 
read," said Gingrich. 

Gingrich explained that our 
social pathologies must be 
addressed, particularly the 
welfare state. "We have a 
challenge, to replace it. This is 
an enormous assignment, " 
explained Gingrich. "If we 
replace it, the cost will go 
down." 

Gingrich went on to poke a 
few jabs at. bureaucracy. 
"Imagine the Wright Brothers 
inventing the airplane in the age 
of the EPA and OSHA?," said 
Gingrich. He joked that the 
Wright's would have to post a 
bond for sand dune damage and 
file an endangered insect report. 
"If OSHA designed the airplane, 
none of you would fly 
anywhere." 

He then commented about 
the length of time it takes to 
execute those sentenced to the 
death penalty. He told the 
audience that one of the 
problems with the long period 
between the sentencing and the 
sentence was that the victim is 
forgotten and the convict 
becomes a public figure. 

Gingrich noted that the 
length of time between the 




Congressman Newt Gringrlch, House . Republcan whip 
delivers the keynote address at the Lake County 
Republican Federation dinner. He spoke on the future 
of America and the realization of a global 
economy.— Photo by James Kay 

conviction of the murderer of some promises of the 
Mayor Cermack in 1933 and his Republican majority in the 
execution was roughly six weeks. House. He promised to reduce 



that the time 
should be 18 



He suggested 
period today 
months. 

"Nobody remembers the 
name of the victims," he said. 
"The murderer becomes a 



the number of committees by 
two and a reduction of 33 
percent in congressional staff. 
He also promised to provide the 
American public with a checklist 
that includes 10 bills which 



celebrity. American history would reform welfare, cut illegal 
teaches us that if you want to sit aliens from welfare, reduce the 

on your porch at night and leave Htigiousness of the legal system, 
your doors unlocked, we need . „ . , A . . . . , , , 
swift and certain punishment." and fm,sh the J ob wth vioIent 

criminals. 



Gingrich went on to make 



formal ctiiH^ntc lict^H Grandparents v olunteer at Safe Place 

VjdJLlllCl OlULlClllO JULdLCtl Every Tuesday afternoon, MM|iaMBaaiAa g HHBtt ^^^^^^^^^^ 

as 1994 NMS finalists 



SUZIE REED __ 

Staff Reporter 

Two seniors at Carmel High 
School have been named finalists 
in the 1994 National Merit 
Scholarship competition. 

Traci Sebastian knows in what 
direction she wants to go. 

"I love foreign languages," she 
said. "I've been a pen pal since 
seventh grade." 

The daughter of Cathy 
Sebastian of Mundclcin plans to 
enter the School of Foreign 
Service at Georgetown University 
in Washington, D.C. Fluent in 
Spanish, she would like to add 
German and Japanese to her 
language skills and definitely 
intends to learn Esperanto, the 
universal language. 

• Traci lived in Ubertyville for 
eight years before moving to 
Mundelcin last August. She had 



her choice of high schools but 
chose Carmel. 

"I like the Carmel spirit. It's 
more of a family," she said. 

Active in co-choir, Traci is 
index editor for the "Spirit" 
yearbook and serves as secretary 
for the National Honor Society at 
Carmel. 

Richard Shcfferson knows his 
college destination is Marquette 
University in Milwaukee, Wis., 
but hasn't narrowed down his 
course of study. He plans to start 
out in the College of Arts & 
Science. 

"1 get more into the arts," he 
said, "drawing and painting." 

The son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Shcfferson, Rich has 
lived in Lake Villa for eight years. 
At Carmel he enjoys activities 
with the Ecology Club. 




Every Tuesday afternoon, 
while young mothers learn 
parenting skills in a weekly class 
at A Safe Place, their pre- 
schoolers are in grand 
parenting hands — those of 
trained volunteers from the 
Warren Township Senior 
Center. 

The mothers are battered 
women, victims of domestic 
violence, who learn in 
parenting groups how to 
nurture and guide their 
children without aggression. 
Parenting is a required 
component of the counseling 
program at A Safe Place, Lake 
County's only shelter and 
counseling program for abused 
women and their children. 

Children who live with their 
mothers at A Safe Place stay for 
six weeks, receiving counseling 
and gaining self-confidence. 
Warren Township Seniors, who 
underwent volunteer training by 
A Safe Place children's 
counselors, add a warm, 
nurturing dimension to the lives 
of youngsters who have escaped 
the volatility of their own 
homes. 

"I just love holding this little 
one. Look how she cuddles up 
to me. It feels so good," said 




Kay Link of Gurnee feeds an Infant at A Safe Place, where 
she participates In a volunteer grandparentlng program.— 
Photo courtesy of A Safe Place 



Carmel students Traci Sebastian and Richard Shefferson 
have been named National Merit scholars.— Photo by 
Suzle Reed.. 



alcohol and drug-free count on warm and caring 
environment by connecting sitters if they wish to return to 
people to programs that the shelter for parenting classes; 

Ilomae Curfan of Lake Villa, as improve the quality of life and the Warren Township 

she held a month-old infant in leading to a better, drug-free Seniors have an opportunity for 

her arms. Across the sunlit community. meaningful one-to-one 

living room, other volunteers "The Grandparentlng volunteering, 

feed babies, read storybooks, Program is a partnership that 

play games and sing nursery benefits everyone involved," The opportunity has been 

rhymes with the children. says Phyllis Demon, executive well-received. "There were so 

The seniors are participants director of A Safe Place. The many volunteers they had to 

in a new program organized by children receive nurturing divide us up and give us every 

Fighting Back, a prevention during a very vulnerable time in other week," said volunteer Kay 

partnership that promotes an their lives; former clients can Link of Gurnee. 

Two scholarships available at CLC 

Applications are being students with good academic qualify, applicants must be 

accepted at the College of Lake performance and a career admitted into CLC's nursing 

County financial aid office for interest in food service. The program, demonstrate financial 

the following two scholarships, application deadline is June 1. need and maintain good 

The scholarship program of Winners will be announced by academic standing. Completed 

the Illinois Restaurant JulylS. applications must be postmarked' 

Association will award several The Illinois Nursing no later than June 1, 

fall 1994 scholarships for Education Scholarship Program Scholarship applications are 

students pursuing a career in has established funds to help available in the financial aid 

the food service Industry, students who want to pursue an office, room B-114. For 

Applicants must be full-time associates degree In nursing. To information, call 223-3610. 











Max o, 1994 AkcUNd Newspapers COUNTY M 





Johnson, Jdclyn 



The following students were 
named to the Tionor roll at 
Carmc! High School in 
Mundclcin for the third quarter. 
Barrinston 
High honors 

Derrick Gingery, Allison Rnlzer, 
Grant Stanolov, Elizabeth Dowries, 
Christopher Jcdd.. . 
Honors 

Elizabeth Ego),- Marc Koclper, 
Rachacl Rowc, Matthew Sztellc, 
Siobhan Payne." 
Pox Lake 
Honors 

Bridgcttc 
Sianula. 
Gray-lake 
High honors 

Raymond Morris, Carrie 
McGowan, Kevin Frocllch, Coliccn 
Krombach, Kimbcrly Frocllch. 
Honors " 

Michael Cullen, Rebecca Klccs, 
Nina Ellsscou, Kelly Haubcr. . 
Gnmee 
Superior honors 

MaribclHltb. 
High honors 

Danielle LaFayettc, Leslie 
Freeman, Erin Jennings, Dandridge 
Til no. 
Honors 

Constantino Hidalgo, Otis 
Carter, Joe George, Kelly Owslany, 
Francis Ang. 
Hawthorn Wood a 
High honors, 

• Beth Castriconc. 
Honors 

Jennifer. Clcry, Lisa 
Rcgina Bruttomesso, 




announces 



Glannini, 
Stephen 



Cartstrand, Nicholas Kuccra, Ian 

Wasscluk. 

Ingleslde . .. 

High honors 



Rachacl Bet2, Susan Brop 
Jennifer' Mann, Elizabeth Smlt; 
Christine Schbpperj Emtlic Woods. 
Honors 

Mark Connolly, Cheryl Meudt, 
Lisa Szukala, Ryan Duffy, Nicole 
Swiss. 

Island Lake 
Superior honors 

Peter Braldo. 
Klldeer 
Superior honors 

Andrea Muzzupappa. 
Lake Villa 
Superior honors 

Richard Shcffcrson, Carrie 
Cohen. 
High honors 

Chris Czcrwinski, Jessica 
Gundrum, Lisa Curran, Bruce Davis 
Michelle Ferrlgan, Brian Lcldcr, 
Joseph Bryslewicz. 
Honors 

Sara Worklan, Patrick Harris, 
Samantha Sillier. 
Lake Zurich 
Superior honors 

Catherine Arvidson, Lanndon 
Rose, Lisa Gadwood, Erin Samoiis. 
High honors 

'Douglas Ogurek, Tara Stanton, 
Ryan Schaul, Matthew Burka, Leah 
Lazarus,- Nicole Lynch, Kathleen 
Williams. 
Honors 

Ginny Gillotti, Thomas Williams, 
Ana Aywaz, Hence Kac, Lauren Ptoog, 
Amy Strutzol, Jaciyn Pokryfke, Kevin 
SwiaL 

Ubertyville 
Superior honors 

Samcr Attar, Erik Jansscns, 
Michael Nash, Heidi Hcrchcnbach, 
Marguerite Kaspcrczyk, Chigyun 
Ryoo, Gregory Zomchek. 
High honors 

Kathleen Cupec, Staccy Moiidor, 



andra Roach, Louis Skrlba, 
Martin Cappcllc, Andrew Els ton, 
Linda Wang, Dana Brucck, Elizabeth 
Buckingham, John Pavlus, Timothy 
Sclz, Colleen Thompson, Brian 
Wcstcrman, Shannon Duffy, John 
Fowler, Julie Kwaslborskl, Steven 
Nash, Sarah Pavlus. 
Honors 

Brian Buckingham, Erin 
McMurrough, Kathleen Tschanz, 
Brian Wagner, John Walsh, Daniel 
Zomchek, Timothy Barrett, Katie 
Cunningham, Kristin Sellkc, Susan 
Victoria, Kathleen Kalista, Noellc 
Nista, Robert Tschanz, Austin 
Cappcllc, Joseph Drennan, Ryan 
Paddack, Daniel Potempa, Vicki 
Tekampc, Mark Tschanz, Charles 
Vitul 

Undentanrst 
Superior honors 

Bridget Chiltcki. . 

Hlgfrhdhors'- 1 \ " ' ' ,:[ 

Lisa Eiicrborck. 
Honors 

Nell Wolff, Annmarle Scully, 
Natalie Barrett, Almce Duddlcs. 
Long Grove 
High honors 

Karen Schulte. 
Honors 

- Lisa Schulte, Ryan Johnson, Lori 
Schulte. 
Mnndeleln 
Superior honors 

Trad Sebastian, Michael Gaiden, 
Ryan Gibbons, Adam laud, Ryan 
Rafferty, Charmalne Smith, Carmella 
D'Incognito. 
High honors 

Fllomena Bellini, Clare 
Manning, Stephanie Webb, Klcmcn 
Strle, Rashml Subbarao, Jennifer 
Greco, Jeffrey Sch lesser, Maria 
Alcvras, Suzanne Brooks, Cathtecn 
Mullen, Kelly Sullivan. 



Honors 

Brett Anderson, Laura Rcscck, 
Michael DlDomenlco, Leah Hcgcrlc, 
Kelly Morton, Heather Schamal, 
Adrlennc Cuttcn, Ansarlc Harris, 
Jessica Philpott, Thomas Sanza- 
Novers, Brian Uzicl, Heather 
Franklin, Barbara Hcgcrlc, Laurence 
Quinn, Pamela Rcscck, Patrick Stroz, 
Sarah Wcrning. 
Round Lake 
Superior honors 

Shanyssa Rivera. 
High honors 

Genesis Rivera, Scott Crawford, 
Anthony TworeJc 
Honors 

Kathryn Sandbcrg, Richard 
Trcvlno, Jorl Spychal, Kristcn 
Vaitonls, Rebecca Strang. 

Vernon HlUa 

Superior honors 




s KwIatL 
High honors 

Allison Lawton. 

Hon T!?in Byrne, Dax Rodrigucz.\ 
Wadaworth 

High honors 

Ajay Easo, Agnes Narikkattu. 

Hon< Nrn!c Pultorak, Joshua WMcttA 
Waoconda 

High honors 

. Cary Janiszewski, Mark 
Klsselburg, Kristin McCrca, Karl 
Schachelmaycr. 
Honors 

Peter Lynch, Wmberly Muellncr, 
Kelli Ferrlgan, Michelle Grlcus, 
Michael Gricus. 

Wlldwood 

Honors 

Kathleen Karrigan, Keri Kohler, 
Michelle Magec. 



; ! I( 



names re 




finalists 



The following Carmcl High SchooTstudents were regional finalists in 
the 1994 National French Test: French I— Danielle Smilie, Arlington 
Heights; and Franccsca Monteleone, Antioch. French II— Matthew 
Burke, Lake Zurich; Adrienne Curten, Mundelein; Heidi Herchcnbach, 
Ubertyville; and Kathleen Kalista, Ubertyville. French 111— Mark 
Tanguay, Ubertyville. French IV — Catherine Arvidson, Lake Zurich. 
Senior Catherine Arvidson, junior Mark Tanguay, sophomore Matthew 
Burke arid freshman Danielle Smilie were also national finalists. 

Catherine Arvidson was interviewed by the French Cultural Attache 
as a possible qualifier for a $4,000 scholarship consisting of four weeks 
in Paris where she would have morning classes for three hours and 
then two additional weeks in France, all expenses paid by the French 
government. However, she did not meet one of the qualifications of 
being 18 years old by July 1, as her birthday is in October. She wili 
receive other prizes at the awards ceremonies to be held at Von 
Steuben High School in Chicago in May. 




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Wjk COUNTY Ukdwd Newspapers M»y 6, 1994 





Winner 

Shirley Dudzlnskl accepts 
her Read It and Reap 
check for $50 from Diane 
Horton, Lakeland 

Newspapers' circulation 
coordinator. 



Foundation 
appoints 
new member 

Gerry Lcidcr, vice chairman of 
Rcntokil Inc.-Tropical Plant 
Services, has been appointed to 
the board of directors at Riverside 
Foundation, a not-for-profit 
organization providing residen- 
tial and day training services to 
adults with developmental dis- 
abilities. 

. Rcntokil Inc.-Tropical Plant 
Services, based in Riverwoods, 
specializes in the sales, rental and 
maintenance of tropical plants. 

Lcidcr holds a BS from Loyola 
University. He and his wife, Judy, 
reside in Lake Forest. 

For more information, call 
634-3973. 



Group 



From page Bl 

Another winner endorsed by 
LCCA was Judy Martini of 
Antioch. LCCA liked the way 
Martini was responsive to resi- 
dents' concerns and her aware- 
ness to protect the Chain O'Lakes 
area. 

Martini defeated long-time 
incumbent Jim Fields, who rated 
a zero for his stand on conserva- 
tion. "Fields defeat," said Wade, 
"should remind elected officials 
that Lake County voters really do 
care about such things as endan- 
gered species." 

Another incumbent that gar- 
nered a percent rating from the 
group was County Board mem- 
ber Colin McRac. Despite the 
fact that McRae is. president of 
the Forest Preserve, McRae was 
unable to convince the group of 
his dedication to conservation. 
They felt McRae was using his 
office to advance a pro-growth 
agenda despite surveys showing 
that county residents strongly 
opposed over development. 

Instead, the group gave new- 
comer Diana O'Kclly their sup- 
. port. LCCA were convinced of 
her commitment to controlled 
growth. 

Although LCCA' state that 
their primary mission is an 
involvement in conservation 
and growth related issues, they 
have decided to continue to 
work for pro-conservation can- 
didates in local elections. Every 
year they plan to rate incum- 
bents voting records and survey 
challengers. Anyone interested 
in more information about LCCA 
is invited to contact the group by 
mail at PO Box 405, Grayslakc, 
, Illinois 60030. 



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M«y 6,1994 Uklmd Newspapers COUNTY 




'Crack' addicts challenge to treatment professionals 



John Merwin, associate direc- 
tor of the Northern Illinois 
Council on Alcoholism and 
Substance Abuse (NICASA), 
remembers when cocaine addicts 
typically snorted cocaine to get 
high. Many addicts would even- 
tually switch to shooting cocaine 
intravenously. • 

"Then the cocaine dealers 
came up with crack," he says. The 
development of that potent and 
easily accessible form of cocaine 
resulted in the perception that 
here was an inexpensive way to 
get high. 

"You hear. of crack being a 
cheaper form of cocaine," 
Merwin says. "It may be cheap to 
buy, but the amount you get 
doesn't last long." ' 

Because the desire for crack is 
so strong, Merwin says addicts 
will do almost anything to come 
up with the money to support 
their habit: armed robbery, steal- 
ing purses from women walking 
on the street, breaking into 
homes. 

Mike Buck is director of 
NICASA's Bridge House, a 
Waukcgan-based residential 
facility for men and women 
recovering from alcohol and 
other substance abuse. He esti- 
mates that the majority of people 
who try crack have significant 
symptoms of addiction after their 
first use. 

Buck says he started noticing a 



substantial growth In the number 
of crack addicts in Lake County 
about two and a half years ago. 

Jim Feret, a Bridge House 
counselor, says cocaine clients 
used to have all kinds of material 
goods: expensive vehicles, a 
wealth of gold chains and nice 
television sets and stereo sys- 
tems. Many of them had high- 
paying jobs.. 

But the crack-addicted clients 
today have none of that, he says. 
No jobs, no material goods. 
Virtually nothing at all. 

Buck agrees, adding, "There's 
a decline in the skill levels among 
clients. They've been using long 
enough that they've lost every- 
thing." 

He says treatment profession- 
als are particularly concerned 
that the bottom for crack addicts 
is so low that they may never be 
able to get help. 

"For many, the . bottom is 
death," Buck says. 

Many crack addicts who do 
enter treatment find it difficult to 
empathize with others, Merwin 
says. They have a total disregard 
for society. 

Feret refers to the "new anger" 
of crack clients. They arc 
absolutely filled with internal 
rage, he says. They show no 
remorse whatsoever. They sec 
almost everyone walking down 
the street as potential prey. 

Buck says treatment profes- 



IDOT chief speaks at 
transportation forum 



Illinois Secretary of. 
Transportation Kirk Brown will 
speak at the open membership 
meeting of the TMA of Lake 
County on May 17, at 9 a m. at the 
Country Squire Restaurant in 
Grayslakc. Willard Hclander, 
executive director of the trans- 
portation organization said 
Secretary Brown will discuss the 
status of implementation of the 
1993 Illinois Employee Commute 
Options Act 

"In light of Monday's 
announcement by IDOT that the 
state is moving forward to imple- 
ment the federally required man- 
date," Hclander said, "It is essen- 
tial for employers to get a clear 
message from the state board 
about what they will need to do." 
She added, "There arc some indi- 
cations that the Illinois ECO pro- 
gram could emerge as more 
'employer-friendly' following the 
ECO Advisory Board meeting on 
May 19 at the Chicago Area 



Transportation Study office." 

Employers of 100 or more 
employers need to know when 
notification letters will go out 
requiring registration for trip 
reduction programs. Area busi- 
nesses and local governments 
will send representatives to hear 
Brown's comments on plans and 
schedules for road construction 
projects recently added to 
Illinois' five-year highway 
improvement plan. 

At last spring's meeting, over 
130 TMA members and guests 
were on hand to hear Secretary 
Brown discuss the legislation 
enacted in March 1993. An equal- 
ly large number is expected to 
attend this year. The meeting is 
open to the public Continental 
breakfast will be served begin- 
ning fl:30 a.m. Brown will speak 
at 9 a.m. Seating is limited and 
advance registrations arc 
required. Call 816-8495 to regis- 
ter. 



sionals face a special challenge 
because crack addicts arc so 
angry and so aggressive. "They 
were hit as children and they 
think it's OK to be violent," he 
says. 

Crack clients- arc also bur- 
dened by a complete sense of 

1 1 just wonted to 
change. I wont to get 
bock on the right 
track. I had values, but 
I never used them. Tm 
learning to... .appreci- 
ate things.' 

—Paul 

hopelessness, according to Buck. 
They think, 'I'm never going to 
lead a normal life so I'm not even 
going to try.*" 

He adds, "We're getting a lot of 
(adult) children of cocaine 
addicts and alcoholics. They were 
raised in a very non-nurturing 
environment" 

Typically, crack-addicted 
clients are in their 20s and 30s 
and spending $100 to $300 a day 
to support their addiction, Buck 
says. 

So, can anything be done to 
help crack addicts who have little, 
if any hope and a habit that's 
extremely addictive and expen- 
sive? Can anything be done to 
help these men and women who 
are so filled with rage? 

Yes, but it is difficult, Merwin 
says. Especially when state fund- 
ing cutbacks result in agencies 
like NICASA having to discontin- 
ue or reduce such adjunct treat- 
ment services as acupuncture 
and biofeedback, both which 
have been tracked by university 
researchers as being very effec- 
tive in helping crack addicts get 
on the road to recovery. 

Still, crack clients can 



LCAVC names HOSA winners 



Twenty-one students of the 
Lake County Area Vocational 
Center (LCAVC) medical assisting 
program participated in the 
Illinois Health Occupation 
Students of America (HOSA) 
State Conference April 6 through 
8 in Springfield. Six first, second 
and third place winners from the 
area will participate at the 
National Conference June 22 
through 26 in Nashville, Tenn. 

The participants are: Danielle 
Vance of Warren High School, 
first in medical assisting-clerical; 
Tonya Keel of Antioch High 
School, first in medical assisting- 
clinical; Jeremy Villacorta of 
Mundelein High School, second 
in medical assisting-cllnical; 
CarUuGrubbs of Warren, fligh 



be helped. 

"There's no one way to treat 
clients," Buck says. "We use a tit- 
tle bit of a lot of approaches 
including a lot of behavioral 
treatment" 

Bridge House counselors pro- 
vide emotional support and help 
clients with values clarification. A 
considerable amount of energy is 
spent on strengthening peer and 
staff relationships through group 
therapy and one-on-one therapy, 
Buck says. Getting crack-addict- 
ed clients to trust others is diffi- 
cult 

Paul, 31, a Bridge House resi- 
dent and recovering crack addict, 
says he liked crack the first time 
he tried it. Crack provided a real 
intense high, and gave him a lot 
of energy. Paul, who has been in 
the halfway house for several 
weeks, says he had used marijua- 
na and LSD before his first expo- 
sure to crack, but nothing gave 
him the rush that crack did. 

His addiction to crack was 
almost immediate and within a 
month after his first exposure 
Paul says he was using 10 to 15 
times a day, spending from $300 
to $400 daily. During one four to 
five day binge, he recalls using 
about $3,700 in crack. 

Paul supported his addiction 
by stealing purses, robbing and 
breaking into houses. People 
walking on the streets were fre- 
quent targets. 

I'd sec how they were dressed. 
If a woman was wearing a mink 
coat and carrying a purse, I'd 
steal trie purse. If I had a gun, I'd 
take the coat" 

Even before he started using 
drugs, he was stealing and rob- 
bing people. Paul says he had ho 
remorse during his using days. 
"Now I do." 

A long arrest record from the 
time he was a juvenile until he 



became an adult and sentenced 
to prison, Paul says he got tired of 
abusing himself and others. 

"I just wanted to change. I 
want to get back on the right ' 
track. I had values, but I never 
used them. I'm learning to care 
about people now, to appreciate 
things." 

He's progressing In his recov- 
ery program at Bridge House but 
admits to having a problem deal- 
ing effectively with anger. 

"I don't react as bad as I used 
to, but I still lash out in anger ver- 
bally at some people. And I still 
have a problem with trusting 
other men. I feel more comfort- 
able talking about feelings with 
women," he says. 

Paul says he enjoys relating to 
other Bridge House residents. He 
has a much improved sense of 
self-worth. 

"I know I'm helpful to people. 
I listen to them. I've been told I've 
got a nice personality and am fun 
to be around, even though 1 do 
have bad moods." 

A patient and caring staff and 
an improving relationship with 
his peers in treatment have made 
Paul realize people want him to 
lead a healthy productive life. "I 
used to think they were out to get 
me." 

Of his counselor, Jim Feret, 
Paul says, "I like him a lot now, 
and I trust him a lot. I may get 
angry at him, but I do trust him." 
While crack-addicted clients 
like Paul pose special challenges 
for treatment professionals, 
NICASA's Merwin says intensive 
therapy in a highly structured set- 
ting like Bridge House can pro- 
duce positive results. — Bill 
Hetland Is a communications 
coordinator/prevention special- 
ist for the Northern Illinois 
Council on Alcoholism and 
Susbtance Abuse (NICASA). 



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School, second in CPR/first aid; 
Nicole Polcretzky of Lake Zurich 
High School, second in CPR/first 
aid; and Jenny Chamboullldes of 
Richmond-Burton High School, 
third in dental assisting. 

Other students placed in med- 
ical terminology, medical math, 
prepared speaking, job seeking 
skills, essay and HOSA Bowl. 

The HOSA Theme, "HOSA 
Starts the Spark to Our 
Everlasting Future," created by 
Jcancttc Licwehr won first and 
will be used as the state theme for 
the 1994-95 school year. 

Donations arc appreciated 
to sponsor these students to 
participate at the national level. 
For more information, call 223- 
6681. ' 



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EDITORIAL UIccIancI Newspapers May 6, 1994 



Letters to t^e EdhoR 



No utilities 
taxes, please! 

Editor. 

I am writing to ask Mayor 
Davis and his trustees, if they 
know what they arc doing to the 
senior citizens and school district 
of Round Lake Beach if they 
impose such a tax in this commu- 
nity. 

Do you realize that most 



senior citizens arc living on a 
fixed income and cannot afford 
such a tax? Do you realize that 
even those seniors that arc living 
in the senior citizen buildings pay 
their own electric and telephone 
bills? 

Do you realize that we have 
two schools in Round Lake Beach 
and the school district is finan- 
cially strapped and is on the State 
Watch list? 








Taxpayers likely will look upon a local option income 
tax designed to solve some of Illinois' school funding 
problems with love in their eyes and hate in their hearts. 
It's one of those kinds of ideas. 

S.B. 141 allows a school district, by referendum, to 
impose a personal income tax of up to two percent on 
the residents. Sponsored by a downstate Republican/the 
measure requires that at least 50 percent of the income 
taxes collected be used to abate property taxes. 

In effect, the bill offers choice in the manner in which 
citizens tax themselves for educational purposes. 

Chances are not much will be heard of the bill, legis- 
lators being notoriously gun shy of tax proposals during 
an election year. But the plan did clear the Senate 
Revenue Committee^ 

Liberals undoubtedly will howl with anguish over S.B. 
141 because the plan could lead to disproportionately 
higher funding of the schools in upper income commu- 
nities. But, if some towns, (we can think of a number in 
Lake County) want to pay more taxes in the hope of get- 
ting better schools, why not let them? The/re already 
doing that in effect, property values being what they 
are. .- 

The local option income tax may not be an idea 
whose time has come, but S.B. 141 demonstrates that 
there are avenues for collecting revenue for individual 
school districts other than hitting homeowners. 








Before the Stormwater Management Agency (SMA) 
was created by the Lake County Board, there was wide- 
spread fear, especially among municipal leaders, that 
the organization would operate in czar-like fashion, dic- 
tating how local communities correct flooding prob-i 
lerris, forcing them to spend money they don't have or 
don't want to spend. 

■Not the least of the worries of village leaders was the' 
potential for a County agency making local land use 
decisions. 

That hasn't happened and it's not likely, budgetary con- 
straints being what they are. SMA has been in opera- 
tion now for several years, operating on an advisory 
basis and serving as a resource bureau. The agency 
barely has' enough funding to sustain itself; 

A good example of how SMA works is unfolding now, in 
the Round Lake area, one of the hardest hit Lake 
County communities in last June's serious flooding. ■ 
Serving as a catalyst for local action. Director Ward 
Miller has village leaders committed to participation in 
a landmark joint flooding study. 

Miller sees the end result of the cooperative study as "a 
regional project with significant capl [tal improvements/' 
That's governmental lingo for a big project costing big ; 
bucks. Solving; flooding problems in -the 31 square mile 
area like Round Lake or controlling the DesPlaines River 
in the Gurnee or Libertyville area whenever it goes on a 
rampage isn't a nickle or dime proposition. Major pub- 
lic works expenditures in such cases are inevitable, but 

SMA won't be.bankrolling the projects. 

The significant thing is that SMA appears to be headed 
in the right direction of tackling flooding on a regional 
basisr In thepast, villages solved stonm^ter dralrtage 
problems by t^sport^ 
the way things work today. 



The people of Round Lake 
Beach elected you thinking that 
you and your Trustees would do 
good for the benefit of the town 
and for the citizens. Arc you 
going to let them down? 

Darlccn Fricdlund 
Round Lake Beach 

Need post- 
prom support 

Editor 

Prom day! Yes, I'm talking 
about prom, more specifically 
post-prom. The Bear Boosters of 
Lake Zurich have diligently been 
working all year for this day. 
We've put in countless hours, 
raised thousands of dollars and 
have had great support from the 
business community. 

Surprisingly, our biggest obstacle 
has come from lack of support 
from some parents. 

Given a choice, kids will 
always choose the unsupervised 
party. We've all heard the statis- 
tics of sexually transmitted dis- 
eases, drinking, and vehicle 
homicide. It's our responsibility 
to provide a safe environment for 
our sons and daughters. 
Hindsight is always 20/20. Let's 
all have some foresight this prom 
season. Please, parents, support 
post-prom. 

Jan Squardo, 
Kildccr 



Follow Whitewater 

Editor 

Every year, Americans under- 
take the unpleasant task of figur- 
ing their tax bill. For many 
Americans, this stress is Intensi- 
fied this year by the fact that they 
must then pay an additional 
amount of taxes to the govern- 
ment. 

President Clinton tells us that 
this "sacrifice" is necessary and 
worthwhile because it will help 
solve America's many problems. 

Yet it seems that the president 
and first lady may owe $45,411 in 
taxes, most of which is a result of 
their Whitewater investment. 
Reports show that during the 
years 1980 through 1992, the 
Clintons continually underpaid 
their taxes, overestimating 
deductions and making ques- 
tionable write-offs. 

It seems strange that the 
Clintons, while deducting a $15 
charitable contribution of used 
underwear, chose not to deduct 
the loss of over $68,000 they 
claim resulted from their 
Whitewater investment 

The Clintons still refuse to 
release all the documents regard- 
ing Whitewater. However, if any 
of the allegations regarding the 
Clintons and Whitewater arc 
true, then the American people 



have the right to know. 

When the rest of America is 
pulling their hair out over the tax 
burden, President Clinton can 
rest comfortably knowing that 
their tax increases will make, up 
for what he and Hillary have 
failed to pay. The American 
people should carefully follow 
the Whitewater investigation 
until these questions are 
answered. 

P. Gcraldinc Schwab 
Arlington Heights 

Support for 
Grainger move 

Editor: 

I would like to respond to 
spmc of the negative letters and 
editorials I have seen in your 
paper regarding W.W. Grainger, 
inc.'s anticipated move to Lake 
County. 

I am an administrative assis- 
tant working for Grainger and 
have been a Lake County resident 
for 23 years. 1 know Grainger to 
be a responsible, caring company 
and am proud to be an employee. 

One recent letter said we 
would be bringing 3,000 more 
automobiles to the area daily. I 
don't sec how that is possible. Of 
the 1,200 employees who would 
be relocating to the new facility, 
Sec LETTERS page B9 



L U I I KJ l\ I /\ L Newspapers 



— Vi Ewpoi NT : mm 

Mini Caravan closer 



BILL SCHROEDER '52 






Publisher 

Every year the lllirU Football 
Caravan, the road show designed 
to fire up Orange and Blue parti- 
sans for the coming gridiron sea- 
son, gets a little closer to Lake 
County. Maybe next year. 

"Could be," remarked Athletic 
Dir. Ron Gucnthcr, who admit- 
ted that the University of Illinois 
Athletic Dept. is going all out to 
expand its fan base in northeast- 
ern Illinois. Lake County's 
upscale demographics and more 
than half million population has- 
n't gone unnoticed by the per- 
sonable AD. 

This ancient Illini and long suf- 
fering U of I partisan extended an 
invitation to Gucnthcr to make 
Lake County a stop on the cara- 
van tour in 1995. Gucnthcr 
accepted the offer without com- 
mital, but he didn't say no, 
cither. 

Next year will be an ideal time to 
establish Lake County as a stop 
on the tour where fans and alum- 
ni gather every spring at some 
two dozen communities around 
the state to meet coaches and get 
a preview of the coming season. 

. "Ron," the hopeful scribe 
implored. "You'll be coming off a 
Rig 10 championship and a Rose 
Bowl victory. North Chicago's 
Johnny Johnson (the Illini quar- 
terback) and Libertyviile's Matt 
Heldman (scholarship basketball 
player) are big sports names. It'll 
tie Ideal for the caravan to visit 
Lake County." 

Diplomatically, due other chose 
not tp respond, but he did pro- 



vide an upbeat answer to our 
question about future relations 
with the NCAA. "That's all 
behind us. In fact, the U of I 
sports program now is consid- 
ered a model." 

Lou Hcnson, head basketball 
coach, and Greg Landry, offen- 
sive coordinator and quarterback 
coach, took bows and regaled 
fans with comments on the 1994- 
95 season, but the biggest 
response — and a rousing 
cheer — was reserved for a com- 
ment from university trustee 
Susan Gravcnhorst, a resident of 
Lake Forest, who affirmed 
emphatically: 
"Chief llliniwck is staying." 
Gucnthcr wasn't kidding about 
the University of Illinois commit- 
ment to northern Illinois. The 
football team opens its '94 season 
with a "home" game Sept. 1 
against Washington State at 
Soldier Field. And get this: 
Hcnson has booked Duke for a 
Dec. 3 match at the new United 
Center. 

No doubt about it, the illini are 
taking the northern hustings seri- 
ously. 

* * * * * * * 

NIXON NOTE — Stories about 
President Richard M. Nixon's 
hatred of the press are legendary. 
Here's one guy, though, who can 
vouch that the late president did- 
n't displse all newspapermen. 

I have a letter in my files, written 
in 1968, acknowledging this 
newspaper's endorsement of his 
candidacy and an expression of 
appreciation from the future 
president of the United States. 




The letter was personal and gra- 
cious, signed by Mr. Nixon, and 
not one of those canned things 
candidates put out by the scores. 
The letter came from the Waldorf 
Astoria Hotel in New York where 
the N'lxons resided at the time. 

I thought about that letter more 
than once last week as many 
Americans mourned the death of 
President Nixon, 

******* 
TEACHER TEACHER — 
Physics instructor Toby Ward is a 
"one man gang" when it comes to 
elevating the level of teaching 
elementary school science. 

The popular College of Lake 
County faculty member is getting 
ready to conduct a second class 
of about 30 Lake County teachers 
under a $30,000 grant from the 
Dwight D. Eisenhower 
Mathematics and Science 
Education program. 

******* 
ONE MAN'S FAMILY— Lucky 
arc the grams and gramps who 
can enjoy seeing the third gener- 
ation on an almost daily basis. 
The little ones never cease to 
amaze. Erika is making signs like 
she'll be walking before crawling 
and John has learned to say, "Ah, 
goo" and "All, ghee." 

******* 

BUi Schroeder offer* editorial 
commentary every Tuesday oh 
Lake County Live presented by 
STAR Channel 3/U.S. Cable at 
5:30 and 7:30 p.m. 



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May 6, 1*94 LaIceIancJ Newspapers COUNIY f 




-Party Lines — — — — — 

Chairman Schulien seeks 




Party Lines, the Lakeland 
Newspapers column of political 
opinion, is prepared from staff 
reports. 

Dr. John Schulien still is 
teaming in his new post as chairman 
of the Lake County Republican 
I Central Committee. . 

One of the first things he's 
{doing is teaching township GOP 
' chairman to think for themselves. 
Bill Burnt, Lake Villa 
Republican chair, was noticeably flustered while handling 
two rhubarbs over new precinct committee posts. Burn 
blurted to one applicant for a vacant precinct: 
"I'll have to check with Bob Churchill Oh! 




think Supervisor Ralph Swank 
ought to rethink his policy about 
keeping township offices closed 
Saturday. The same folks insist the 
short hours weekdays arc for the 
birds. At the high cost of township 
government! the taxpayers want 
more service. 

• • • 

Quiet visit— A visit to Lake 
I County the other day was on the 
Churchill quiet side for U.S. Sen. Phil Grimm 

(R-Tcxas). Gramm was in Lake Forest to address 
Republicans interested in helping elect more GOP state 
representatives.' Maybe the fact that tickets were $250 
each contributed to the lack of notoriety. 

• • • 

Open up — More than a few Libertyville residents Busy guy— -Maybe because he's a busy guy was 



Schulien 






rSi 


*' |W^'.^F>j 


B. ■' 3 ?5 


v> — r^m 


V 


Schmidt 





the cause for failure of State 
Rep. Bob Churchill (R-Lakc 
Villa), good Republican that he 
is, to lower the American flag he 
flics dally at his home on 
Fairfield Rd. to half staff during 
the mourning 
period for 
President 
Nixon. 



• • 



Hat race — . 

County Board Rep. Suzl Schmidt 

(R-Lakc Villa) sounds like she's in a 
race' with Gurncc Mayor Dick 
Weiton for the most public office 
hats. Schmidt wants to be appointed 
a precinct committccperson. 




Wolton 



Letters 



From page B8 . 

about half of us arc already Lake County 
residents. Many of us live north and west 
of the proposed land site and presently 
work in Lincolnshire. ? 

Another thing I would like readers to 
keep in mirvl is that not all Lake County 
residents arc against this move and, in 
fact, even in Mcttawa, we have many sup- 
porters. 

Elaine M. T rumble 
Spring Grove 

Fears rodeo cruelty 

Editor 

During the Wauconda rodeo a few 
years back a horse broke his neck. I am 
hoping that this would never happen 
again. I was at a press conference at the 
Wauconda library where a video of last 
years rodeo was shown. It was amazing 
that there was so much animal cruelty 
going on. 

Please don't support the Wauconda 
rodeo this year. It's not good business to 
advertise in a program for an activity that 
is so controversial. Many people feel the 
way I do. I was surprised to hear that a 
newspaper would advertise (you should 
be unbiased) in the rodeo program. Your 
paper even wrote stories on this very sub- 
ject 

Too bad the animals don't have a 
choice of whether or not to participate. 

Kimbcriy A. Froelke 
Hawthorn Woods 

Illinois not 
labor friendly 

Editor 

Gov. Edgar and other pro-business 
leaders would have you believe that 
Motorola chose Harvard because of the. 
pro-business climate in Illinois. 

The pro-business climate is actually an 
anti-employee climate. 

Illinois ranks third in numbers of work- 
ers of all kinds who work without a job 
contract! Almost all Illinois workers, with a 
few exceptions, arc just permanent tem- 
porary people. 

Most of this is the workers' fault for fail- 
ing to undo the damage done to labor by 
the Bush and Reagan . administrations, 
which requires tossing out the anti- 
employee legislators on elcctioh day. 

Protected from the employees by not 
having to have a job contract, and with 
probably eventually being included under 
the Five percent real estate tax cap not to 
mention $36 million in state supplied 
incentives, all of which comes from the 
taxpayers' pockets, is it any wonder that 
Motorola chose Harvard? 

How ironic it is that the state of Illinois 
can Find $36 million to spend on Motorola, 
but cannot fund schools properly. 

Tom Vaughan 
Wauconda 




Chained dog 
no protection 

Editor: 

Crime is one of the greatest concerns of 
Americans today. As a preventive mea- 
sure, some people think that placing a 
"watch" dog in, their yard will help to pro- 
tect their home. Wrong! 

Dogs who live constantly chained to 
coops, confined to runs or even with free 
run of a fenced yard cannot guard their 
owners as well as pets who live inside, in 
close contact with the family. 

An "outside" dog, even a normally fero- 
cious one, can be tamed with treats and 
friendship. Dogs arc social animals, and 
"outside" dogs arc usually starved for 
attention. A clever thief can easily befriend 
such a dog. 

If a dog lives inside, however, no 
stranger will be able to establish an 
alliance with the animal. The dog will 
understand that the family is his or her 
"pack" and that the entire house is territo- 
ry to be defended from intrusion. 

Beverly J. Salo 

President Lake County 

Animal Protection Assn. 

Gurncc 

Hush Rush 
bill decried 

Editor. 

Congress is trying to pass the Fairness 
in Broadcasting Act to regulate the opin- 
ions and commentaries of radio and tele- 
vision broadcasters. But rather than sim- 
ply having the public's best interest in 
mind, politicians in Washington arc sim- 
ply trying to quiet the broadcast personal- 



ities who have been challenging their 
political policies. - 

The Fairness in Broadcasting Act would 
force stations to give free, equal time to 
the opposing view of any issue discussed 
on the air. 

It is clear that Congress is trying to keep 
shows like Rush Limbaugh off the air 
because of the incredible influence con- 
servative commentators like Rush have 
had public opinion and action. 

If the liberals pushing the Fairness in 
Broadcasting Act are tired of the opposi- 
tion conservative commentators tike Rush 
Limbaugh are stirring up, then they 
should look at and reevaluate their poli- 
cies rather than simply ignoring America's 
First Amendment right to a tree press. 

Allan R. Schmid 
Waukcgan 

Long time lining up 
for tolls collection 

Editor 

Illinois tollway directors continue their 
arrogant "business as usual" attitude by 
paying their departing pal, Robert 
Hickman, a "consulting" fee of up to 
$12,000 to aid in the transition as Mr. 
Wehner takes over for him as executive 
director. 

With over three decades of experience 
working previously for IDOT, what can Mr. 
Wehner possibly learn from an ex-auto- 
mobile dealer about running the Tollway 
Authority? Given Mr. Hickman's bunglings 
that, ultimately, cost him his job, perhaps 
it would be better if Mr. Wehner avoided 
"consulting" with his predecessor lest he 
pick up any of his bad habits! 

This cost savings of $12,000 would be 
welcomed by all the tollway users who will 



pick up this consulting tab at 50 cents per 
car as they drive past the Taj Mahal (aka) 
the Tollway Headquarters Building in 
Downers Grove. 

Since the tollway collects over $800,000 
in tolls every day, their willingness to pay 
Mr. Hickman $12,000 for a questionable 
consulting agreement may not seem like 
much to the high rollers on the tollway 
board, but to a tollway user, $12,000 is a lot 
of money. Imagine a single line of cars 
backed up over 00 miles long, each waiting 
to put 50 cents into Mr. Hickman's toll col- 
lection basket. That is what $12,000 looks 
like to a tollway user! 

Robert Carroll 
Hawthorn Woods 

County GOP machine 
politics on the loose 

Editor 

The Republican party in Lake County 
should be ashamed of itself. The recent 
appointment of Shawn Dcpkc (son of 
Robert Depkc, Lake County Board 
Chairman), to a vacant precinct commit- 
teeman post would be considered back- 
alley politics by most people. 

However, Shawn Dcpkc who lost his re- 
election bid for precinct committeeman in 
March of this year, was also elected as 
township chairman by his fellow commit- 
teemen. These same committeemen then 
decided to shield themselves from any 
public scrutiny by voting to keep their vote 
a secret. This is the most nauseating case 
of "machine politics" I have ever heard of. 
Do you think the Republican Party in Lake 
County has something to hide? Does this 
sound like $&*#@#@* to you too? We the 
voters, need to do something to change 
the long-standing history of machine poli- 
tics in Lake County. 

John Schulien, GOP Chairman in Lake 
County, should receive the grand prize for 
being the biggest disappointment to Lake 
County Republican voters. Mr. Schulien 
has stuck us with another "machine politi- 
cian" who gets his marching orders from 
"The Boss." It appears Mr. Schulien has 
been bought and paid for by the Lake 
County Republican party. The actions of 
John Schulien and the Warren Township 
Republican committeemen who voted to 
keep their individual votes for township 
chairman a secret should be made public 
knowledge. Mr. Schulien and the commit- 
teemen should remember that the 
Republican voters in Lake County put 
them into office and have a right to know 
how they vote on every issue. 

The Republican party in Lake County 
will never unify as long as John Schulien 
continues with "politics as usual." I sug- 
gest that John Schulien and Shawn Depkc 
resign from their offices immediately. If 
they truly care about the Republican Party 
in Lake County, they should take their 
antics to the Democratic Party in Cook 
County, They would both fit right in. 

Dave Anderson 
Gumee 



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1 GOOD BEGINNINGS UIceIancI Newspapers M*y 6, 1994 



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After school child care help available for working parents 




The school day ends at 3 p.m., but 
your work day may not be over until 5 
p.m. or later, counting travel time. How 
will your child be cared for after school 
while you are at work? 

Many children do take care of 
themselves In their own home after 
school. However, this may not be the 
best answer for most children. 
What working parents can do 

•Find out If your employers allow a 
flexible work schedule or job sharing so 
you can be home when your child 
returns. 

•Ask a neighbor, friend or relative to 
care for your child In or out of your 
home. 

' »Rnd out if a school age child care 
program Is available either In a family 
day care home or center. A licensed 
family day care home would have a 
smaller group of children than a center 
■ with a home setting. 

A child care center will have larger 
groups, but many have more resources 



and activities such as field trips. Look at 
both settings before you decide which 
Is best for your child. 
Where to look 

Many schools and local agencies 
such as park districts, YWCAs and 
YMCAs offer before- and after-school 
care. Your employer may also have a 
program to assist employees In finding 
school age child care. 
Resources available 

•Child Care Resource and Referral 
for Lake and McHenry counties can 
offer you Immediate referrals of current 
care available, 

This service Is available at the YWCA 
of Northeastern Illinois by calling 
l(800>CHILD-76 Monday through 
Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 
Friday 9 a.m. to noon. A sliding scale 
fee from $0 to $30 covers a 12 month 
service. 

•Friends, neighbors parents of your 
child's classmates and teachers can 
tell you of programs they know about 
and their experiences with them. 

•An excellent source of additional 
printed Information on school age child 
care needs and self care Is Project 
Home Safe. Call l(800)252-SAFE for free 
Information. 
What to look 

•A safe environment that provides 
large indoor and outdoor areas. Check 
for written health, safety and emer- 
gency rules that staff follow. '. * 

•Qualified staff should have training 
to work well with school age children In 
a group setting that Includes child 



development, recreation, education or 
social work. 

• Licensing allow child-staff ratios to 
be up to one adult per 20 children In 
centers for quality care. 

Family child care homes may have 
one adult per eight children. Ideally 
these ratios would be smaller. 

•Adult-child Interaction should be 
friendly, helpful, caring and enthusias- 
tic. : 



Positive guidance and discipline Is 
needed to encourage children's Inde- 
pendence and development of prob- 
lem solving skills. 

•Activities In school-age programs ■ 
should allow for "letting off steam" 
after school. 

A variety of materials are needed 
to keep them Interested.— by DIANE 
PHIUPP, Child Care Resource and 
Referral program director. 



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3 Children's Discovery Center 

700 W. Rollins Rd. • Round Lake Heights 
A Piaget Discovery Preschool 

*Camp Discovery* 

"FOR A SUMMER OF FUN" 

Great for ages 6-12 

Explore and discover our weekly themes through arts and 

crafts. Water fun, sports and much, much more! 

*Piaget Preschool Summer Camp* 

Ages 2-5 years old 

Every child wants a summer of fun! 

Highlighted events Include splash days, picnic lunches, summer 

Olympics and much, much more! 

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DETAILS 

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Look for The sign in the window and register at the following locations: 






■ 



El Ranchito Michoiacano Restaurant 

Art's Old House 

Kaiser's Pizza 

Gurnee Chiropractic Clinic 

Merlin's Muffler & Brake 

Domino's Pizza - Liberryville 

Larsen & Petersen 

First Midwest Bank 

Commonwealth Edison - Zlon 

Powerhouse 

Eagle Home Improvement 

Ultimate Body & Health & Raquet 

Club 

Country Faire Laundry 



First National Bank - Antioch 

ERA Benchmark Realty 

Under the Sea 

ERA Stateline 

Dianna's Hair fit Tan Salon 

Randell's 

Struggles 

Altaian's Flowers 

Sammies Hot Dogs 

Limoscenes 

Jerry's Parkway Foods 

Magic City 

The Holiday Shoppe 

Giordano's Pizza 



Fodrak's 

Lambs Farm 

Warren Newport Credit Union 

Selenak's Carpet Villa 

Fun Harbor 

Pizza Hut - Waukegan 

Hillside Restaurant 

Chalet Restaurant 

Ram Rental 

Toft Auto Racing - Wilmot Speedway 

Chicago Medical School 

Steele Home Health Care 

Angela's Attic 

Audio Smith 





' 




M*y 6, 1 994 UIccIancI Newspapers LAKELIFE 




Founders return to Adler Center, May 6 




Doug Miller 




Bonnie Mlllor 



SUZIE REED 

Staff Reporter 

. Doug and Bonnie Miller, who 
began the Libertyville School of 
Folk and Old Time Music (now 
the David Adler Cultural Center) 
almost 20 years ago, will perform 
at a special concert at 8 p.m. May 
6 in the ballroom of the Adler 
Mouse. 

Their performance will focus 
on the musical, heritage of the 
Midwest, and Illinois in particu- 
lar. Using old-fashioned instru- 
ments like the autoharp, fiddle 
and dulcimer as well as banjo and 
guitar, they, work to keep these 
musical traditions alive with a 
musical tour of American history/- munlty space for that We had to 



After serving as director of the 
School of Folk and Old-Time 
Music, Doug Miller was musical 
director and later executive direc- 
tor for the AdJcr Center. Hc«is 
now director of Folklore Village 
Farms In Dodgevillc, Wis. 

The School of Folk and Old 
Time Music was created in 1 975 
and later merged with the 
Ubertyville Art Club to become 
the Adler Cultural Center. 

"A few of us who played folk 
music really wanted a place 
where we could share the music 
in a non-competitive, listening 
environment," he explained. 
"There wasn't any sort of corn- 



find a bar with an open stage. We 
wanted to create a place where 
anybody could go In and share 
any kind of music" 

The' acoustical character, of 
the music, Miller said, was not so 
much for the natural sound as In 
deference to the electrical limita- 
tions of the building. 

The group began by gathering 
every Friday night They held a 
concert once a month; that grew 
to twice a month. Then other 
classical Instruction was added 
along with the monthly barn 
dance. The Center became a 
research facility for traditional 
music in Illinois, complete with 
Sec ADLER CENTER page B21 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



laskan adventure brings minister 
- — - closer to faith — 




MARCIA SAGENDORPH 

Correspondent 

Alaska— where the cold reaches 
into your body to steal your 
breath away;whcrc the darkness 
completely engulfs the sun, 
except for a pitiful few hours each 
day; and where the comforts of 
everyday life arc a hot stove to 

s warm yourself by and long stories 
shared among friends. 

Without question, this life is far 
removed from the luxuries of 
Lake County, where anything you 

. need is only a five minute drive or 
a phone call away. But, some 
people have adventure calling 
them to go beyond the comforts 
of suburbia, to see if they arc 
capable of living off the land 
where every face is a new one and 
every custom seems strange. 
Pastor Jim McDonald of the 

. Libertyville United Methodist 
Church recently returned from 
just such an adventure in Anvik, 
Alaska, a village about as far away 
as you can get without leaving the 
United States. 

The Mission 

McDonald stated that he had 

always had dreams of walking in 

• 50 mile an hour winds with snow 

whirling all around him, with a 

big smile beneath his face mask. 



Mis love of cold weather likely 
stemmed from growing up in 
Canada. (McDonald, his wife 
Greta, who is also a pastor, and 
their two children moved to 
Libertyville in 
1905.) 

Last summer, McDonald saw a 
story in the United Methodist ; 
Reporter concerning volunteer 
mission needs in Alaska for those 
who like the cold and dark. With 
his family's encouragement, he 
called for more information. "I 
told the District Superintendent 
that I was willing to go and do a 
short term project wherever 1 was 
needed," McDonald stated. "She 
asked if I would go to Anvik, as no 
one else had accepted that area. 

"Then my questions began. 
Could I afford this, trip? Would 
my family support it? Would my 
church allow me to be gone for 
two months? The positive 
responses I received from church 
and family enabled me to say 
"Yes!" 

As a pastor for 17 years, 
McDonald had been on other 
missions. He had taken three 
trips with groups of teenagers 
from Lake County down to John's 
Island, South Carolina/to rebuild 
homes for impoverished families. 
The trip to Anvik, however, was 



McDonald's first solo mission. 

This was an adventure 
McDonald had wanted for a long 
time. When the- day came to 
leave, however, his teenage 
daughter became upset and 
cried. "I think the kids suddenly 
realized 1 would be gone for a 
fairly long time," McDonald said. 
"1 almost changed my mind and 
didn't go." 

Getting There 

Traveling to this remote area 
was an adventure iq itself. 
McDonald took a direct flight at 8 
a.m. on a crisp January morning 
from O'llare to Salt Lake City, 
then another non-stop to 
Anchorage, arriving around 8 
p.m. Then he hopped on a small 
plane for the two hour ride from 
Anchorage to a small village 
called Aniak. 

There, McDonald waited anx- 
iously in the metal airplane hang- 
er that served as the airport. A 
snow storm developed and 
reduced the visibility outside, 
until it became too dense to fly. 
The pilot, a petite twenty-five- 
ycar-old woman, told McDonald 
and the few other passengers that 
they would have to stay there for 
the night. 

"I didn't know what 'there' 







meant," McDonald recalled. "So 
1 asked her where I could find a 
good place to stay in town, and 
she said at the Benders." This 
local Eskimo family frequently 
took in travelers when the planes 
were stranded. "They opened 
their home to me without ques- 
tion, and said I had the whole 
upstairs to myself," McDonald 
explained.. "But as it turned out, 
they came upstairs 
and we spent the night talking." 

The Benders could tell a good 
story, McDonald said. As 
Eskimos, they told that the 
Indians were feared and distrust- 
ed because of raids long ago on 
the Eskimo villages, where 
Indians stole the Eskimo chil- 
dren. (Ironically, when he talked 
later on with the Indians, 
McDonald heard the same story 
except that the Eskimos stole the 
Indian children.) 

The next morning, one of the 
Bender children asked for fish 
eyes for breakfast "1 thought he 
was joking," McDonald said, "but 
that's a real delicacy." 
McDonald passed on the fish 
eyes, but did sample smoked 
salmon sticks, which arc similar 
to beef jerky. 

Finally, it was safe to fly to Anvik. 
McDonald recalled, "It was a sin- 
gle engine plane, the kind where 
everything shakes and rattles. It 
was so small that they even asked 
how much I weighed before I got 
on!" 

Village People 

Located 200 miles north of 
Anchorage on the lower Yukon 
River, Anvik was settled in 1080 
by the Athapascan Native 
Americans. As the first pastor in 
the area since 1940, McDonald's 
mission was to facilitate church 
services and Sunday School. 

Since several people already 
practiced various religions, he felt 
it was more important to befriend 
the people instead of changing or 
converting them. "My biggest job 
was to show them love, under- 
standing and acceptance," he 
explained. Getting to know every- 
one was his favorite part of the 




Pastor Jim McDonald 

trip. From Charlie, a gruff man 
who lived in the woods and loved 
to kid; to Ted, who convinced Jim 
that boots could be made out of 
fish skin; to Mary, an 80-ycar-old 
woman who lived alone — the 
people made distinct impres- 
sions on McDonald. 

Especially Mary. She told 
McDonald that her parents didn't 
want her when she was little 
because she was a girl. So they 
sent Mary down river to a board- 
ing school at Holy Cross for most 
of her young life. "She described 
a sense of complete separation 
from her family and her culture, 
as she was not even allowed to 
speak in her native language. 
Only English was spoken at the 
boarding schools. Mary and a 
few friends would sneak out 
behind the school to talk Indian. 
If they were caught, their mouths 
would be washed out with soap." 

In the middle of her stories, Mary 
would get up, go to the door, 
open It, and spit out into the 
snow. Ukc many of the older 
women in Anvik, Mary liked to 
chew tobacco. 

"Mary said she was scared about 
the heat," McDonald recalled. 
"She said, 'I pray to the Lord Jesus 
each night that there's enough 
wood to keep the fire burning. 
She said she didn't like to go visit 
her children in Anchorage 

Sec ALASKA page B21 



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IAKELIFE LAkElANil 1 Newspapers ' ! M*y tt/'lf 94 ! 



ItfVI 



Kids Fare 



'Explore' plans next session on May 14 



The next College of Lake 
County "Explore" scries, a mini- 
Saturday course program for 
junior high students, will be 
offered Saturday, May 14. 
Students may enroll In up to 
three classes offered from 9:30 to 
11:30 a.m., 12:15 to 2:15 p.m. and 
2:30 to 4:30 p.m. at CLC's 
Grayslake campus, 19351 W. 
Washington Street, 

Classes scheduled for 9:30 
a.m. arc "Word Processing, " 
"Beginning Ceramics" and "First 
Aid." Classes offered at 12:15 
p.m. arc "Do You Want to be a 
Doctor?" "Needlcpunch Em- 
broidery," :Computer Graphics" 
and "Beginning Ceramics." 
Sessions at 2:30 p.m. include 
"Drawing and Painting," 
.Computer Writing" and 
"Needlcpunch Embroidery." 

The cost for classes ranges 
between $10 and $20 per class. 
Students who attend three class- 
es will receive a $5 discount. 
Students may bring their lunch or 
purchase lunch for the cafeteria. 
For registration and complete 
information, call 223-3616. 
'Oliver' 

Northbrook Theatre will be 
offering the Broadway favorite, 
"Oliver" by Lionel Bart. Part of 
the wide appeal of this tuneful hit 
is perhaps the theme of family 
and finding a place to belong - as 
illustrated by the famous hits 
from "Oliver," "Consider 
Yourself' and "Where is Love." 



"Oliver" will run Fridays, 
Saturdays and Sundays through 
May 0. Tickets arc $12 at the 
door or $10 paid in advance. 
Senior and group discounts arc 
available. Call 291-2367 for more 
information. 
Toxta!es' at Stage Two 

This spring, Stage Two brings 
the stories of Aesop to life, with a 
rollicking musical rendition of his 
best loved fables, "Foxtales." 
Author Charles Pascoe weaves six 
Aesop fables into a fun-filled 
dramatization of the adventures 
of Sonny Fox. 

Stage Two's second children's 
show of the season, "Foxtales" 
chronicles Sonny's travels as he 
sets out to find out about the rest 
of the world. Sonny plays tricks 
on the animals he meets in the 
forest without realizing the hurt 
he Is causing. He steals cheese 
from the Crow, gets the Rooster 
to jump Into the well and serves 
the Stork her favorite dinner on a 
plate from which it is impossible 
for her to eat Eventually, these, 
three team up to each Sonny a 
lesson about the importance of 
friendship and working together. 
When Sonny takes these other 
animals home to meet his father, 
they encounter another lesson in 
overcoming prejudice. 

The play is directed by long- 
time Stage Two director and 
Children's Program Coordinator 
Norma Cribb. 

"Foxtales" will have a public 



performance on Saturday May 7 
at the Stage Two Theatre. 
Showtimes will be 10 a.m., 1:30 
and 7 p.m. • Tickets arc $3 and 
reservations can be made by call- 
ing 662-7088. . 
Interact with science 

Come join the Powerhouse 
for this spring's Science . of 
Saturday activities. The Power 
House, Commonwealth Edison's 
hands-on energy education and 
resource center in Zion presents 
Science on Saturday to help visi- 
tors understand how their energy 
uses and choices affect the way 
we all live. All presentations take 
place at 11 a.m„ 12:30 p.m., 2 
p.m. and 3:30 p.m. 

The Power House is located 
on the shores of Lake Michigan 
just north of the Illinois Beach 
State Park. It is fully accessible to 
disabled visitors and Is open to 
the public free of charge Monday 
through Saturdays from 10 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. For more information, 
call at 746-7080. 

little Red and friends 

Stepping out of an all-time 
favorite storybook and on to 
Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre 
for Young Audiences is Little Red 
and Her Friends. Performances 
are scheduled through May 20 
most Wednesdays and Fridays at 
10 a.m. and Saturdays at 11 am. 

Individual tickets arc $6 and 
are available, by calling the box 
office at 634-0200.— by RHONDA 
ViNZANT 



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American Security Mortgage 

1 NBD Plaza, Suite 205 
Lake Zurich, IL 60047 

(Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee) 

When you're serious about saving money, call 

1-800-798-7628 or (708) 540-6122. 

Conventional loans as well as second mortgages also available. 




Into t^e NiqhT- 



Friday 

The New Duncan Imperials plus Collateral Damage arc fea- 
tured at Shades, 21060 N. Milwaukee Ave., Dccrficld, 634-BLUE. 
Shades will also be hosting a Jagcrmclstcr party , . . Lynnc Jordan 
& the Shivers with Pete Special sing the blues at Slice of 
Chicago, 36 S. Northwest Hwy., Palatine, 991-2150 . . . Dave 
Anderson ft the I-Lttes, reggae, at Cabana Beach Club, 1550 N. 
Rand Road, Palatine, 776-9050 . . . Redeye Express will be singing 
rock and blues at Brat Stop, 12304 75th Ave., Kenosha, (414) 057- 
2011. 

Saturday 

Duke Tomato*, blues, at Shades . . . Chicago R & B Kings at 
Cabana Beach Club . . . Studebaker John & the Hawks are at 
Slice of Chicago '.'. .Redeye Express at the Brat Stop. 

Coming Soon 



Tickets for "Hell Freezes Over," The Eagles World Tour, arc 

on sale now. However, even longtime Eagles devotees may find the 
prices too steep, about double of most other conceits this summer. 
Reserved tickets for the July 14th World Music Theatre show are 
priced at $1 17.25 and $87.25 while lawn tickets at The World arc 
$37.25. Reserved tickets for the July 15th Alpine Valley show arc 
priced at $1 19.75 while lawn tickets at Alpine Valley are $40.25. 
Advance tickets are available at all Tickctmaster Ticket Centers. 
Hell may indeed freeze over before some people would pay 
those prices, even for one of the best bands of the late 70s. — by 
CLAUDIA M.IENAKT 



Tour of North Shore benefits caneer society 



The American Cancer Society 
will present the 19th Annual Tour 
of the North Shore at the North 
Shore Hilton in Skokic on 
Sunday, May 15 from 7 a.m. to 2 
p.m. 

The ride will start and end at 
The North Shore Hilton, 9599 
Skokic Blvd., Skokic. Rides will be 
distances of 10, 26, 50 or more 
miles to provide maximum flexi- 
bility for all cyclists. Registration 



fee is $10 in advance, $12 the day 
of the event. 

The Tour of the North Shore 
is dedicated to the memory of 
Rebecca Hcathcrington, an active 
11 -year-old Old Orchard Junior 
High School student and Skokic 
resident whose life was cut short 
by cancer. Support vehicles will 
monitor the course and help will 
be available at each rest stop. For 
more information call 328-5147. 



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F. Y, I . 



CLC exhibition 

The annual College of Lake 
County," Student Art 
Competition, a juried exhibit, 
Is on display at the 
Community Gallery of Art, 
19351 W. Washington St, 
Grayslake. The exhibition, 
featuring drawings, paintings, 
ceramics, sculpture ' and 
prints by art students, will 
continue through May 13. 
The gallery hours arc 8 a.m.' to 
10 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Friday, 9 a.m.. to 4:30 p.m.' Saturday 
and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. The exhibit is 
free and open to the public. For infor- 
mation, call Steve Jones, 
curator/exhibit coordinator, 223- 
6601, ext. 2240. 
i 

Art contest 

Area artists of all ages arc invited to 
participate in the 10th Annual Art 
Show and Contest sponsored by the 
Zion Chamber Orchestra. The; show, 
along with the orchestra's concert, 
"French Fantasy," will be held Friday, 
May 13 at the Christian Arts 
Auditorium, Dowle Memorial Drive, 
Zion. The art show begins at 6:30 p.m. 
and the concert at 8 p.m. Works will, 
be judged in four different categories: 
Kindergarten through third grade, 
fourth through eighth grade, high 
school and adulL A separate category 
for three-dimensional art will include 
atl ages; First, second, and third place 
awards will be presented in each cat- 
egory, with a $50 cash prize for Best of 
Show. All entries must be framed or 
matted and be prepared for hanging. 
Each entrant will receive one free 
ticket to the evening's concert. 
Registration fees arc $5 for adults, $4 
for high school 1 students and senior 
citizens; ' $2 for children through 
eighth grade. Artists submitting works 
must register by Monday, May 9 In 
the office of: the, Christian Catholic 
Church Arts Auditorium between 5 
and 9 p.m. on Thursday.. May 12. For 
more information call 872-4803. 




* ' '■'.'<■ 



Stage Two 

Foxtalcs," an adaptation of 
Aesop's fables that follows the 
stories of the fox .will run 
through May 7 at Stage Two . 
Theatre, 12 N/. Sheridan Rd,, 
Waukegan. For more Infor- 
mation call 662-7088. 

Windy City 

Marriott's Lincolnshire 
Theatre, Ten Marriott Dr., 
Lincolnshire, presents 

"Windy City." Based on the 
1928 Ben Hccht and. Charles 
MacArthur play, "The Front Page," 
"Windy City" Is the quintessential 
Chicago musical comedy about dirty 
politics and tabloid Journalism. 
Performances arc Wednesdays at 2 
and 8 p.m; Thurs-days and Fridays at. 
8 p. in, Saturdays at 5:30 and 9 p.m.. 
and Sundays at 2:30 and 7 p.m. Ticket 
prices are $3250 for all performances. 
Call 634-0200 for further ticket infor- 
mation. 

Audition 

A production company is seeking a 

mate baritone-tenor voice for Cabaret 

style performance In June. Call 

Candiss; Hill at 548-1395 for an 

.appointment 

'Madame Butterfly* 

... The Bo wen Park Opera Co. brings 
Puccini's well known opera "Madame 
Butterfly" to the stage of 4hc 
Goodfcllow Hall through May 7. 
Goodfcllow Hail Is located In Bowen 
Park just off N. Sheridan Road in 
Waukegan. The Bowen Park Opera 
Co. Is currently injts eighth season 
presenting the well known opera in 
English. A story about a young beauti- 
ful Japanese woman who becomes 
the wife of ah American naval officer 
is touching and poignant The cross 
of. cultures Is extraordinary as East 
meets West. Production dates arc 
May 6 and 7 at 8 p.m. Tickets arc $15 
for adults and $12 for full-time stu- 
dents, senior citizens, and military 
personnel. For more information call 
360-4741. ' ■ ' 



Summer auditions 

Timothy; Mooncy, director of 
Stage Two, will host simultaneous 
auditions for three world premiere 
plays: "Artificial Intelligence'*, by 
RogcrCaldweII,'"The Progressives" by 
John Attanas, and "An Occasional 
Impala" by George Savage Ir. These 
three plays will open on the final 
three weekends of July, premlering 
July 14, July 21 and July 28, and then 
run In rotating repertory through the 
month of August Auditions of the 
shows will be hctd on May 14 and 15 
from noon to 6 p.m. Rotes are avail- 
able for as many as nine men and 
eight women. Appointments arc 
being taken at 662-7088. 

Northbrook Theatre 

The Northbrook Theater is offer- 
ing the following performances 
"Applause," the musical version of 
"All About Eve," "Rumors," Nell 
Simon's hilarious new farce about 
gossip and comcdlc Innuendo in New 
York, and "Man of Lamancha." Sec all 
three shows for a subscription price 
of $25. For more information, or to 
order season tickets, call 291-2367. 

Kirk Players 

The Kirk Players, a non-profit 
community theatre organization, will 
finish their 1993-94 season on June 10 
and 11 with a performance of the 
warm comedy/drama "Just For 
Tonight." It will be held at 8 p.m. In 
the Mundelcln High School Theatre, 
1350 W. Hawley St -All proceeds 
donated to the Military Order of. the 
Cootie and Bright Horizons. Ticket 
prices arc $5 for adults, S3 students, 
$2 for senior citizens and children 
underage 12. Tickets will be available 
at the door. For more information call 
John Lynn at 566-6594. 

Theatre auditions 

Auditions for the College of Lake 
County's summer theatre produc- 
tion, "Italian-American Reconcilia- 
tion" by John Patrick Shanlcy, will be 
held .at 7 p.m. Wednesday and 



•«3* 





ers 

and the 

Round Lake Area Park District 

Present 

JOB FAIR '94 

m 





Whether you're 
looking for a 
job, or looking 
to fill one you 
won f t want to 
miss out! 



WHEN* Friday, May 20, 1994. 12 noon - 4 pm 

WHERE * Round Lake Area Park District 

814 Hart Rd. (Corner of Hart Rd. & Rt. 134) 
Round Lake, IL (Entrance off of Hart Rd.) 

Watch for the 1994 Lake County Employment Outlook in 
the May 13 edition of your local Lakeland Newspaper. 

For more information call 

(708) 223-8161 




Thursday, May 11 and .12/ In the 
building 5' theatre, 19351 W. 
Washington St., Grayslake. Auditions 
arc open to CLC students and com- 
munity residents. The production will 
be presented at 8 p.m. July 8, 9,15 and 
16. The play is a llghtheartcd comedy 
exploring male/female relationships 
and the sometimes unsettling and 
funny complications that ensue. For 
audition Information, call Robert 
Coscarclli, at 223-6601, ext 3623 or 
2550. 






Spring concert 

The ' Chaln-of-Lakes 
Community . Orchestra , will 
present Its spring concert on 
Saturday, May 7 at 130 p.m. 
at the new Trinity Lutheran 
Church, Long Lake, Route 
134, Ingle side. The orchestra 
will piay a variety of light clas- 
sical music with many tunes 
well known to the audience of 
all ages. The orchestra Is 
directed by Linda Pankrantz, 
music., director of Gavin 
School. For more informa- 
tion, call Ann at 587-1359 or Margaret 
at (815) 675-2297. 

Northwest Symphony 

Music Director and 42 season 
veteran of the Northwest Symphony 
Orchestra Perry Grafton will conduct 
his final concert on May 22. Concerts 
arc held in the auditorium of Maine 
Twp. High School West; 1755 S. Wolf 
Rd., Dcs Plaines. All concerts begin at 
3:30 p.m. Tickets at the door arc $8 for. 
adults, $6 for seniors and students 
and children under 12 are free with an 
adult. Call 317-9343 for further infor- 
mation. 



Ragtime concert 

Max Morath, America's foremost 
ragtime piano player, returns for his 
sixth appearance at the Woodstock 
Opera House Saturday, May 14 at 8 
p.m. The show will feature cl assic rag- 
time by Scott Joplln and Eubie Blake, . 
and female ragtime composers 
Adaline Shepherd and May Aufder- 
hclde; as well as several of Morath'r 
own ragtime compositions. Wood- 
stock Opera House is located at. 121 
Van Burcn SL Tickets are SIS and can 
be reserved by calling (815)338-5300. 

Musical workshop 

The New Musicals Guild will host 
a workshop meeting on Sunday, May 
22 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Wilmette 
Public Library, 1242 Wilmette Ave 
Members are forming collaborations; 
to create lG-minute musicals for a 
staged reading presentation this fall. 
Ongoing research topic Is "What 
Makes Successful Collaborations?" 
Writers, lyricists, composers ' and 
other Interested persons are invited 
to attend. For further information call 
550-6422. 

Square dance 

Buoys and Belles Square 
Dance Club will sponsor "I 
Remember Mama" dance 
with Bob Wilson calling 
squares and Elissa Pischke 
quclng rounds on Friday, 
May 6. Dancing from 8:30 to 
11 p.m. with a round dance- 
workshop from 8 to 8:30 p.m. » 
The dance will be held at First 
United Methodist Church, 
128 N. Utica SL, Waukegan. 
Call 662-6546 for further information. 





Do You Know The Way 
To San Jose? 

by JIM WARNKEN, PRESIDENT 
NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

No, not San. Jose, California, Immortalized In song. The San Jose I'm-, 
referring to Is about two-and-a-half hours by plane south of Miami andj 
the capitol of the subject of today's column, Costa Rica. 

More specifically, we're going to focus on the national parks andj 
reserves which cover no less than twenty-seven percent of Costa Rlca'sj 
total land. 

If you're into spelunking, Barra Honda National Park, with Its many, 
unexplored caves, Is for you. Along with the expected bats, you'll find] 
rare blind salamanders. 

Bird watchers should enjoy the over 340 species' of birds which call| 
Braulio Carritlo National Park in the country's highland, home. Get there, 
early, since fog tends to move In later In the day. 

Guanacastle National Park, established to protect migratory paths, can, 
be explored by renting a horse from the boarding stable located there. 

Manuel Antonio Park may be Costa Rica's smallest, but It's also one off 
her most popular. Here, visitors can view the rare squirrel monkey as : 
well as enjoy a sandy white beach with excellent snorkellng. 

Want to see an active volcano? Visit Rincon de la Vieja, or the more, 
developed Volcan Peas, Park, Best time is April or May as rainfall Is 
pretty heavy the rest of the year. 

Hiitoy Cerere Reserve Is where you'll find the Jesus Christ lizard, so 
named because [factually walks on water. 

Monteverde Cloud Forest, founded In the 1950's by a group of 
Quakers from Alabama, boasts over 500 species of butterflies and Is the 
only known home to the Golden Toad. 

Costa Rica's many parks are only one of the factors for the 150 
percent Increase In visitors since 1990. We'll explore more In future 
columns. 



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2234 E. Grand Undenhurst, III. 
24 Hr. Recorded Bargains - 356-2000 

(708) 356-3010 



"• 



n 




LAKELIFE LaIceIanH Newspapers M*y 6, 1 994 












I 



SpEciAl Events 



Playhouse offers successful revival of ■ Maine* 



Country Festival craft show 

Historic Richmond Is celebrating Mother's Day by hosting its seventh 
annual Country Festival craft show May 7 and B, Fifth craftcr will exhibit 
at the craft show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. just one block easier of the Inter- 
section of Rtc. 12 and Rtc. 173, adjacent to 1 lunlcr Country Club. The first 
600 mothers visiting the show will receive a free spring silk flower. For 
more information call Donna (days) at (815)670-2165 or Heidi (evenings) 
at (815)678-4045. 

Assist Animal Foundation garage sale 

Donations arc needed for the Assist Animal Foundation's Spring 
Garage Sale, which will be held May 22 In Crystal Lake. Household Items 
in goad condition arc being requested. Call (815)455-9411 for further 
information. 

Pottery exhibit at Cuneo Museum 

The works of potter Arthur Towala will be featured, along with the 
works of Claire Bcrgcr and Shu Hwang, at the Cuneo Museum and 
Gardens, 1350 N. Milwaukee Ave., Vernon Hills. The exhibit opens May 8. 
On Sunday, May 8 Ikcbana flower design arrangements will be featured 
with the pottery. An opening preview will be on Saturday, May 7 from 3 to 
5 p.m. and will feature poetry readings in the flower conservatory. For , 
more details call Mariko Ventura Flood at 362-3042. 

County bike ride 

Ride, walk, Job or skate to help fight diabetes. The American Diabetes 
Assn. will hold its annual Bike Ride Plus at the Moraine Hills Slate Park on 
Sunday, May 15. The two routes (which range from 3.5km to 5.5km) begin 
at the McHcnry Dam Concession and at the park office. All participants 
will receive a Bike Ride Plus l-shlrt and arc eligible to win a variety of 
prizes. All collected funds arc used to help maintain and expand the 
American Diabetes Assn.'s research and education programs. Call 
(312)346-1805 or 1(800)433-4366 for further details. 

Solar eclipse program 

A solar cctipsc program, hosted by the Lake County Forest Preserve's 
Lake County Museum and the Lake County Astronomical Society, will be 
held on Tuesday, May 10 at the Lake County Museum Rtc. 17G, west of 
Farificld Road, near Wauconda from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. All ages arc 
invited to attend. The fee is $2 per person, and includes admission to the 
museum's exhibits. Call 526-7878 for more Information. 

Zanies Comedy nite club 

Appearing through May 8 at Zanies Comedy Nite Club In Vernon Hills 
is Larry Rccb, best known as "Uncle Lar" has appeared on HBO's One 
Night Stand, Showtimes Comedy Network, The Tonight Show and VH 1 
Standup Spotlight. For ticket information call 549-6030. 



Tls the season for revivals, and 
Candlelight Dinner Playhouse is 
cashing in with a tricd-and-truc 
chestnut, the musical "Mamc." 

Paul Scrofano holds the lead 
in this bouncy song-and-dance- 
fillcd production based on the 
novel by Patrick Dennis and play, 
"Auntie Mamc," by Jerome 
Lawrence and Robert Lee. 

In previous incarnations, 
"Auntie Mamc" was a movie in 
1959 featuring Rosalind Russell 
and a Broadway hit in the late 
1960s starring Angela Lansbury. 

Scrofano is cut from a differ- 
ent mold than cither Russell or 
Lansbury. She may lack- their 
commanding stage presence, but 
she knows how to deliver a con- 
vivial Mamc in a technically pol- 
ished performance. The local 
actress has amassed an impres- 
sive and vailed string of stage 
credits, from Bella in the Royal 
George production of "Lost in 
Younkers" to Eva Pcron In 
Marriott Lincolnshire Theater's 
"Evita." 

As the free-spirited Mamc, 
she's sort of a Pied Piper to her 




"Marne" stars Paula Scrofano 
Bronnan. 

orphaned nephew Patrick, for 
whom she devotes herself to 
unlocking the doors of life's pos- 
sibilities. 

Matthew Brcnnan is preco- 
cious and precious as young 
Patrick, while Will Chase charms 
as the grown-up version of the 
same character. Among others 
lending support include Mary 
Robin Roth as Mamc's caty 
actress friend; Iris Liebcrman as 
the personal secretary; Dale 
Benson as the bullying banker, 



In mo title role wlfh Matrhow 



and Robert Gallcher, the short- 
lived husband, i (i, 

"Mamc" features frequent, 
colorful costume and set changes 
and a number of comfortable old 
songs such as "If He Walked Into 
My Life" and "We Need a Little 
Christmas." 

All in all, this is a successful, if 
not overly ambitious, revival. 

"Mamc" runs through May 
22. 

For ticket information call 
496-3300— by TOM WHOM 



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LIFE'S A BEAR 



DONNA ABEAR 



The m 




Dear Mom: 

With Mother's Day just 
around the corner, I'm taking this 
opportunity to let the world know 
(okay, Lake County, most of it) 
how I feel about you. 
. We've had some rough times 
over the years, but somehow it 
still boils down to just one 
thing — you're my mom. 1 love 
you. Simple as that 

Not that you haven't gotten 
on my nerves once or twice, but 1 
won't mention that here. And 1 
always did think you liked my 
older brother the best, but I won't 
mention that either. Why dredge 
up the past? Of course there was 
that time when... never mind. It 
doesn't matter. 

1 have to admit that my per- 
ception of you has changed over 
the years. As a small child, I 





- ' 







all holidays 



thought you knew everything, 
and it was especially amazing 
how you figured out that babies 
popped up from a cabbage patch. 
(Of course, things have 
changed — today they're made in 
factories and sold in stores, as 
"Cabbage Patch" kids). Not to 
mention that you had some very 
influential friends, like the Tooth 
Fairy and Santa. 

As for the Sandman, perhaps 
you shouldn't mention your 
association with him to anyone — 
I think the FDA would like to 
know more about that stuff he's 
putting in children's eyes. 

When I became a teenager 
(for you readers out there who 
don't know me— that was just a 
few years ago), I suddenly found 
that you had been fooling me all 



Space available for 'Digging Dinosaurs' 



"Digging Dinosaurs" is the 
theme of the 1 1th Annual Smith 
Symposium, held on May 8 and 
15 at the Rycrson Conservation 
Area near Decrficld. 

Sponsored by Abbott 
Laboratories, the Friends of 
Ryerson Woods and the Lake 
County , Forest Preserves, the 
Symposium offers bird and wild- 



flower walks, and nature work- 
shops led by experts from across 
the Midwest. 

Bird and wild flower walks begin 
at 7:30 a.m. and end before the 
workshops begin. Workshops arc 
$4 and registration Is required. 
Complete registration informa- 
tion is available by calling 948- 
7750. 



those years. You actually knew 
nothing. How could you, when I 
knew everything? _<. 

For several years, I couldn't 
help by roll my eyes at all the 
dumb things you said. I even 
avoided going anywhere in pub- 
lic with you for fear you might 
speak to one of my friends. When 
it came to the subject of sex, it . 
was hard to believe you could 
provide any useful advice, since 
everyone knows that parents 
don't do that sort of thing. Gross. 

No w that I ' m an adult (sort of) 
and the mother of four children, I 
see in a whole new light You're 
not just ray mother, you're a 
woman. A human being with feel- 
ings and desires of your own. Oh, 
yes, and a brain. You regained 
that by the time I reached my 20s. 
Too bad that I've now lost mine 
(just ask my teenaged sons). 

There is one thing I have to 
ask you though. Once when you 
were angry you said that you 
hoped someday that I would have 
a child just like me. 

That was a compliment, right? 
I'm sure it was. Well, I hope it 
was. Wasn't it? lust wondering. 
Happy Mother's Day. 

Love always, 
your daughter 



TO BENEFIT 
ASSISI ANIMAL FOUNDATION 

(No-Kill Animal Shelter in Crystal Lake) 

MAY 22 
AT 

VETERANS ACRES NATURE CENTER 

WE ARE LOOKING FOR GOOD, 

WORKABLE ITEMS FOR THIS FUNDRAISER. 

YOUR DONATIONS ARE ALL TAX-DEDUCTIBLE. 

WE ARE ESPECIALLY INTERESTED IN COSTUME JEWELRY 

CALL LISA AT (708) 587-8670 OR 

YVONNE AT (708) 615-8348 

IF YOU HAVE ANY ITEMS TO DONATE. 

NO LARGE APPLIANCES OR CLOTHING, PLEASE. 



Good Food 



Fresh asparagus for spring menu 



CLAUDIA M. LENART 



Regional Editor '. 

Spring Is in full swing and fresh asparagus spears are popping 
up at the markets at reasonable prices. Following is a spring 
recipe from 'Fast and Fabulous Dinner Parties" by Micheie 
Braden, published by Macmlllan Publishing Company. 
Asparagus, and Scallop Pasta with Lemon Cream Sauce 

1/4 pound unsalted butter 

3 shallots! minced 

4 to 6 cloves garlic, minced 
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley 
Grated zest of two lemons, minced 

1 cup dry vermouth 

2 cups heavy cream 

2 pounds uncooked angel hair, fettuclne or Ungulnl 

1 pound asparagus, trimmed and cut Into 1 1/2- to 2-inch 

lengths 

1 pound sea scallops, sliced Into 1/4-inch thick rounds, soaked 

in milk for at least one hour in refrigerator and drained 

Salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste 

Freshly grated nutmeg to taste 

Fresh lemon juice to taste 

1/2 to 1 cup pistachios, chopped 

Freshly grated mlzlthra or Parmesan cheese to taste 

* 

For the sauce, melt half the butter in a large saucepan and 
saute the shallots, garlic and parsley, and zest over low heat until 
the shallots are tender not brown. Add the vermouth, bring to a 
boll over high heat and reduce by half. Stir in cream and reduce 
by about a third or until slightly thickened. Season with salt and 
pepper 

meanwhile, bring a large pot of slated water to boil. Blanch 
the asparagus until barely tender, about 3 to 4 minutes. Remove 
the pieces with a strainer and add them to the sauce. 

Cook the pasta until al dente. At the same time melt the 
remaining butter in a large, heavy skillet and saute" the scallops 
with the pistachios briefly over medium-high heat, until the scal- 
lops are just opaque. Season with salt, pepper, nutmeg and 
lemon juice while cooking. 

Drain the pasta and transfer to a large warm bowl. Toss with 
scallops, sauce, and desired amount of grated cheese. 



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LAKEUFE LaIceIancI Newspapers May 6, 1 994 



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Retired teachers plan spring luncheon 

The Retired Teachers Assn. of Lake Counly will hold its next meeting at noon 
on Tuesday, May 10 at the Country Squire restaurant, Rtcs. 120 and 45, 
Grayslakc. A prc-funchcon social will begin at 11:30 a.m. The program will fea- 
ture lanct Schwartz and Millie Bcrliant, both members of the Illinois League of 
Women Voters. Schwartz serves on the ILWV "Progress Illinois" State Tax 
Committee; Bcrliant chairs the 1LWV Lake County Tax Committee. Their topic 
will be "The Illinois Financial Mcrry-Go-Rountl, a Ride We Can No Longer 
Afford." Call 356-3252 for reservations. 



'Serial Mom' needs sugar, cream 



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Networking opportunities 

Expand business contacts throughout Lake County by joining dynamic busi- 
ness men and women who meet every Wednesday at 7:15 a.m. at Denny's 
Restaurant, Rte, 41 and West Park Avenue in Highland Park. For further details 
call Charmalnc Estcp at 548-1010 or Gaiynn Sarvcr McKcnzic at GG2-01 19 



TriunsdAy 



Exchange Club meets weekly 

The Exchange Club of Grayslakc meets every Thursday at noon at Whitney 
Street Restaurant in Grayslakc, upstairs. Visitors and prospective members arc 
invited to Join the club for lunch and learn more about the Exchange. For more 
information and reservations contact Bob Wcggc at 223-0777, Monika 
O'Connor at 223-5547, or JoAnn Rllzwollcr at 223-8161. 



ISiiHSM 



.?.%■•« •;• 



NNSP to hold meeting 

Cindy Richards will present "The Glass Ceiling: Is Sales The Hammer We Need 
To Break It?" at the May 16 dinner meeting of the National Network of Sales 
Professionals (NNSP). Her talk will deal with thebarriers that prevent women in 
sales from occupying corporate suites in greater numbers. Dinner will be at 6 
p.m. at the Wellington of Arlington, 2121 S. Arlington Heights Road, Arlington 
Heights. Reservations can be made by calling 253-2661. Cost of the dinner Is $26 
for non-members, S20 for members, and S28 for walk-ins. 

Motocross race set 

The Slo-Pokcs Motocyclc Club will be holding a motocross race at the former 
MaptchursL Cycle Park, 11006 Wiimot Rd., Spring Grove on Sunday, May 15. 
Gates open at 6 a.m., practice at 8 a.m., first race at 9:30 a.m. An AMA card, full 
riding gear, and medical insurance Is required. For further information call 
(815)728-0B23 or (414)637-4386. 



Kathleen Turner seems to rel- 
ish playing tough girls on the sil- 
ver screen. 

Now Director John Waters, no 
stranger to wclrdncss and the 
unpalatable - although we liked 
"Hairspray" - and Ms. Turner 
have turned the sancitity of sub- 
urbia inside out with the premise 
of "Serial Mom." 

Can this model parent, who 
looks more like a Betty Crocker 
ad from the '40s, really be a mani- 
acal serial killer, despite the Ozzic 
and Harriet images? 

Sam Watcrston, a fine actor 
wasted in this role, plays her hus- 
band, while talk show hostess 
Ricky Lake is her sex-crazed 
tecnaged daughter and Mathcw 
LHIard plays their son. Finding 
teens who arc really into horror 
flicks - the bloodier the better - is 
also too true to be funny. 

"Serial Mom," might have 
been a dynamite black comedy 
10 years ago but Waters and 
entourage arc victims of the 
times. 

Comedy is exaggeration and 
the unexpected. Lampooning 
Donna Reed gone looncy, or a 
daughter chasing anything in 
pants, even Turner's gutter lan- 
guage and penchant for the gorcy 
does not seem to be an cxaggcra- 




Kathleen Turner In "Serial Mom"0 

tion by today's standards, when 
we have come to expect the unex- 
pected. 

There is very little left in the 
shock bank when people kill for 
team jackets or because they" 
don't like your haircut. "Tain't 
funny, McGcc." 

We could almost expect the 
characters played by Turner and 
Co. to show up on Ricky Lake's 
talk show along with John Wayne 
Gacy and Jcffery Dahmcr. 

The instant switch from 



Mother Teresa to Lizzie Borden 
has its funny moment, that is the 
first time around. 

It all becomes very old, quick- 
ly, leaving a lot of ho-hum film 
footage to sit through. 

Our generation might find a 
lot of this movie more demented 
than funny. 

In tight of this, we give 
"Mom" two out of of five stars 
despite the fact, or maybe just 
because, Mothers' Day is around 
the corner.— by GLORIA DAVIS 



; : ; :;-MoNThly/M€CTiNll| 



lough Love 

Tough Love meets every Monday at 
7 p.m. at the Round Lake Area Park 
DIst., Hart Road and Rte. 134, Room 
1 1 4. Call Kay at 546- 1202 or Debbie at 
949-0356 for further details. 

Parent Group 

The Parent Group sponsors weekly 
Parents Anonymous support groups. 
Fridays from 9 to 1 1 a.m., Thursday in 
Vcmon Hills from 7 to 9 p.m. and in 
Zion on Tuesdays from 8 to 9 p.m. 
and Wednesday from 3 to 4:30 p.m. 
For more information call 263-7272. 

Alzheimer's Group 

Alzheimer's Support Group meets 
in Llndcnhurst the third Wednesday 
of each month from 7 to 9 p.m. at 
Victory Lakes Continuing Care 
Center, 1055 E. Grand. They also meet 
the first Monday of each month at 
Salem United Methodist Church, 115 
W. Lincoln Ave., Harrington. Call 933- 
1000 for further information. 

Blue Lite Singles 

The Blue Lite Singles Club, for ages 
50 and up, meets the first and third 
Thursdays monthly with get togcthcrs 
planned throughout the month. For 
details call 623-1147 or B72-1065. 

Moms Club 

The Moms Club of Wauconda, a 
support group for at-home mothers, 
meets the second Thursday of each 
month at the Wauconda Twp. Hall, 
505 Bonner Rd. at 9:30 a.m. The club's 
activities include meetings with guest 
speakers, playgroups, special outings, 
and a monthly Moms night out. For 
more information call 526-4073. 



Belvidere Mall 

Theatres 662-741 

Belvidere at Lewis in Waukegan 



a 
a 
a 
a 
a 

a Fri. 

a 
a 

a 

a 

a 

■ac 



11.50 all seats all shows 
ACE VENTURA, PET 
DETECTIVE (PG) 

& Mon.-Thurs. 3:00-4:45-6:30-8:10-9:45 
Sal. & Sun. 
1:15-3:00-4:45-6:30-8:10-9:45 

ABOVE THE RIM (R) 

Fri. & Mon.-Thure. 

3:15-5:15-7:30-9:40 

Sat. & Sun. 

1:00-3:15-5:15-7:30-9:40 



Ample Parking 
LIGHTNING JACK 

Fri. & Mon.-Thure. 

3:15-5:15-7:15.9:30 

Sal. & Sun. 

1:15-3:1 5-5:15-7:15-9:30 

SUGARHILL(R) 

Fri. & Mon.-Thurs. 

4:15-7:05-9:40 

Sat. & Sun. 

1:45-4:15-7:05-9:40 



Need a New Set of Wheels? 

Motor on to the Transportation 

Section of this Week's Classifieds 



f GURNEE CINEMA ^ 

! GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL * 708-355-9940 


SR. C1T. MAT. $2.50 W & F • MATINEES - ALL SHOWS BEFORE 5:30 
FRIDAY, MAY 6 THROUGH THURSDAY, MAY 12 


MIGHTY DUCKS 2 


PG 


F-SU 12:15-2:35-7:10; M-TH 7:10 


THE FAVOR 


R 


F-SU 4:50-9:30; M-TH 4:50-9:30 


FOUR WEDDINGS AND A FUNERAL 


R 


F-SU 1:30-4:35-7:05-9:35; M-TH 4:35-7:05-9:35 


CLEAN SLATE 


PG-13 


F-SU 12:10-2:30-4:50-7:15-9:35; M-TH 4:50-7:154:35 


3 NINJAS KICK BACK 


PG 


F-SU 12:50-2:55-5:00-7:054:15; M-TH 5:00-7:054:15 


WITH HONORS 


PG-13 


F-SU 12^5-2:4W:55-7:0M:1O; M-TH 4:55-7:004:10 


NO ESCAPE 


R 


F-SU 1:454:204:504:20; M-TH 4:204:50-9:20 


BAD GIRLS 


R 


F-SU 1:00-3:05-5:15-7:30-9:45; M-TH 5:15-7:304:45 


SERIAL MOM ■ 


R 


F-SU 1:15-3:20-5:30-7:354:25; M-TH 5:30-7:354:25 1 


BRAINSCAN 


R 


F-SU 1:10-3:15-5:25-7:254:40; M-TH 5:25-7:25-9:40 | 


PCU 


PG-13 


F-SU 12:40-2:50-4:454:554:00; M-TH 4:45-6:554:00 J] 



■■WE 

LAKE ZURICH THEATRES 708-550-0000 
ROUTE 12 EAST OF ELA RD.. LAKE ZURICH 

•6 OO ADUL TS --3 OO (.HJLOREN il'mloi I 1) 
'3 00MONFRI UNTIL 5 PM SAT *T.UN UNTIL 2 in PM 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY 5* 


MIGHTY DUCKS 2 (PQ) 


1-3:30-0:48-0:60 


3 NINJAS-KICK BACK (PQ) 


1 :3O-3:48~O:3S-a:80 


BACK BEAT (R) 


1:25-3:36-fl:3CMI,6a 


CLEAN SLATE (PQ13 


1:50-4:10-0:35-0:00 


WITH HONORS (P0 13) 


1:60-4:l8-fl:80-8 


PCU (PQ13) 


1:46-e:3B 


BAD QIRLS <R) 


3:2B-0:30 


BRAINSCAN (R) 


1:10-0:18 


SIRENS (R) 


3:40-0:30 


FOUR WEDDINGS & A FUNERAL. (R) 


1:20-4-0:20-0 


MAJOR LEAGUE II (PQ) 


2-4:10-0:40-0:00 


THE PAPER (R) 


1 :4O-4:0P-«i:30-e:40 



o -. 



Quit Smoking 
In 60 Minutes 

Only $ 89°° 

No Weight GainI 



By Individual 

Appointment 

One Year 

Guarantee 

• Call for 
information 

356-2670 or 

1-800- 

310-2675 




James R* Baker 

Certifisid 
Hypnotherapist 




Cjnm.vt Oocom 



CiisEplex OdJEON TIieatres 



RIMERTREE C03LJran 



Being Human (PG-i3) (Dolby) 

2:00-4:40-7:20-9:45 



With Honors (PG-13) (Dolby) 

230-5:00-7:20-9:35 



Clean Slate <PG-i3> (Dolby) 

2: 10-4:25-7:05-9:25 



Tour Weddings and a Funeral <R> (Dolby) 

1:50-4:40-7:10-9:40 ■ 



P.C.U. (PG-13) (Dolby) 
1:45-3:40-5:30-7:20-9:10 



Schindler's List (R) (Dolby) 

130-5:00-6:35; Weekdays 8:35 
Tltreesome <R) (Dolby) 

1 -30-330-5:30-7:30^9:30 



The Paper <r> (Dolby) 

2:00-4:35-7:0O-9:30 



3 Ninias Kick Back (PG) (Dolby) 

130-330-5:30-7:30-9:30 



SHOWPLACE 1-7 815-455-1005 
ROUTE 14 & ROUTE 31. CRYSTAL LAKE 

•5 OO ADULTS - 3 OO CHILDREN | Under III 
'3 00 MON -FRI UNTIL 5 PM SAT t, SUN UNTIL 7 in PM 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY 5/6 

I MIGHT DUCKS 2 (PQ) .1:45-4:154:304:40 I 

WITH HONORS (PQ1 3) 2:10-4:200^0-8:55 

BACK BEAT (R) 1:504-5:100:20 

3 NINJAS KICKBACK (PQ) 2-4:054:45-6:40 

I PCU (PQ1 3) 2:304:304:05 

BAD QIRi-S <R) 7:00 

MAJOR LEAQ9E 2 (PQ) . 1:30-3-304:35-0 

FOUR WEDDINGS & A FUNERAL <R> 1:35-3:554:154:45 



OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE 



TTTTTTTI I I I I I I I IT 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY 5/6 

SHOWPLACE 8 -26 N. WILLIAMS STREET, CRYSTAL LAKE 
l 5" Adulls - '3™ Child (11 & Under) 815-455-1005 



CLEAN SLATE (PG13) 



FRI.. MON.-THURS. 4:45-9 
SAT. 5 SUN. 2:1ft-4:30-«:4S-» 



ANTIOCH THEATRE 
378 LAKE ST., ANTIOCH 395-021 6 



•4" ADULTS »2" CHILD {1 1 & UNDER) »2" UNTIL 5 P.M. 
3 NINJAS-KICK BACK (PG) 



FRI., MON.-THURS. 6:45-8 
SAT. & SUN. 2:15-4:30-6:45-9 



LIBERTYVILLE 1 & 2 
708 N. MILWAUKEE. LIBERTYVILLE 362-3011 



'4* ADULTS • »2» CHILD (1 1 & UNDER) - «2» FIRST AFTERNOON SHOW 
NAKED GUN 33 1/3 (PG1 3) F Sjtfffis iJJ. wiS 

FRI., MON.-THURS. 8:30 
SAT. A SUN. 4:304:30 



MONKEY TROUBLE (PG) 



II450 mi 

. ' SEATS SHOWS 



MY FATHER FRIii mon.-thurs. s:45-o 

THE HERO fPG* SAT - * 8UN, 2-4:154:45-9 



Serial Mom <r> 

1:45-3:45-5:45-7:45: Weekday* 7:45 



Bad Girls (R) 

9:45 daily 



Back Beat <R> 

2:004:30-7:00: Weekday 7:00 

The Favor <r> 

9:15 Daily 
No Escape <R) (Dolby) 



McHENRY 14 2-214 GREEN ST . McHENRY (816> 385-0144 



M" ADULTS - »2» CHILD (1 1 & UNDER) - »2» UNTIL 5 P.M. 
NAKED GUN 33 1/3 (PG1 3) m^wSftlSSeSi 



»3» ADULTS - »1«CHILD{11 & UNDER) -«1 M UNTIL 5 P.M. 
THE PAPER (R) 



FRI., MON.-THURS. 6:30-8:45 
•AT. * SUN. a-4;154:304;4» 



W-ifl' tf*«V3 



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M*y 6, 1994 LAkftwd NcwspApcre COUNTY E 







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I 
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It Should Be Here... 



i 










,< 



Rate - A.P.Y. Effecf/Ve April 20, i994 

Limit $50,000 • per household 



I 







Percentage 

Yield 
(A.P.Y.) 

additional 

Increase Over Any 

Existing Rate on All New 

Certificates of Deposit 

(Does not apply to Passbook accounts) 



SECOND FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN 



2 East Grand Ave, Fox Lake, I L 



(708) 587-6311 



^ba^e.oop^ 



per famny-Coupon cannot oeusea in c »,„u,™u.. -,... _..,-...--. /%_.«.— ...ni'ti/ 

fff /ears of Continuous Service To The Community 



K • - - ' : ' 



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1 
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It* 



III 
i 







I'lAWurfe'WcEUNd Newspapers May A, Iff 4 ' 



T 



CrossworcI 



ACROSS 

I. — bloomer 
5. 1'csilvc event 
y. Party siaplc 

12. Sign of sorrow 

13. — Guinness 

14. With 2 Down, 
infamous 
Ugiituhtt 

15. i : ruslr.ilc 

17. "I'll -You in 
My Dreams" 1 

IK. Whole 
; 19. Slar's 
statuette 

21. Bond villain 

22. Racer Andrclli 
24. Extinct bird 

27. Yon fellow 

28. Lather 

3 1 . Actress 
MacGraw . 

32. Wallet bill 

33. Maiden name 

34. Acircss 
Arinsirong ■ 

30. Near star 

37. Underworld 
river / 

38. Chooses 
IK-rfonncrs for 

40. Hamuli 
vuliloqliy verb 

41. HrcniMmkitig 
. byproduct 

43. -Sail ingredient 

47. — Ullmann 

48. t.ccimc 
51/ Frost ''-•< 
52. Scope 




53. Runner 
Scbasliati 
and family 

54. Road goo 

55. Squad 

56. Football 
players 

DOWN 
I. Mine 11 1 id 
' 2. Sec 14 Across 
3. Midterm, e.g. 
,'4. Los Angeles 
section 
5. Chess or 
checkers 



6. TV alien 

7. Hilo souvenir 

8. Thespian 

9. Reduced price 

10. Brainstorm 

11. Docking site 
16. Spanish gold 
20. Dro's sib 

22. Less 

23. "You said il!" 

24. Bit of goo 

2.1 Pamplona cheer 

26. Unearth 

27. Emcee 
29. Susan of 

"LA. Law" 



30. Dr. Ruth's topic 
35. "Cheers" 
bartender 
37. Lend astray 

39. Egypt's Anwar 

40. Heckler's cry 

4 1 . Stepped down 

42. Costa — 

43. Confidence 
scheme 

44. Strike while 
it's hoi 

45. Exploited 

46. Disorder 

49. Fury 

50. Coustcan's milieu 





ESJKg iineo SB" 

egg HG3E nan 
ESS?. 3BS SpSSJ 

K^K OBP1S3HiSD51 
B51B WISE KUgK 



rCUss Reunions 



. Magnolia High School Class of 1969, 
Anaheim, Calif., will hold their reunion 
July 15 through 17. Contact Jack Dick at 
(714)636-6359 or FAX (714)535-4904. 

Grant Community High School Class 
of 1974 is planning their 20th class reunion 
for Aug. 13. Classmates should contact 
Patti Knack Shogrcn at 587-5434 for fur- 
ther details. 

Grant Community High School Class 
of 1954 is planning a reunion for Saturday, 
Sept. 17 at Andre's Steak House in 
Richmond. Classmates should contact 
Harry Henningsen at 587-7444. 

Alumni Systems, Inc. Is currently 
seeking alumni for the following classes: 

Antioch Class of 1984, Oct. 15 at 
Andre's Steak House, Richmond; 

For more information call Alumni 
Systems, Inc. at (815)477-0858. 



^•^ 



Pool Openings 

Starting at $ 1 25 

Save an additional $ 20 
. with mention of this ad. 

Protect your investment with a professional pool opening. 
Chemicals included to property open your pool. 



[•Repairs •Weekly Cleaning Service 
SPA REPAIRS ON ALL MAKES & MODELS 
Custom Designs: • Spas * Waterfalls * Ponds 

Our #l Priority Is Our Service and Customer Satisfaction 

Luxury Pool & Spa 

(708) 548-2366 

f 

Put a little bit of Luxury into your life 



E 



ARIES (March 21 to April 19) An 
unusual job opportunity presents it- 
self this week. Your intuition gives 
you the answers you require. Others 
will find you especially charismatic 
this week. An investment oppor- 
tunity looks too good to. pass. up, 
Socialize with friends this weekend., 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) 
You may find an offbeat study fas- 
cinating this week. Couples will be 
making plans for travel. Some busi- 
ness disruptions arc likely but 
progress picks up later. Reaching 
agreements with others and the sign- 
ing of contracts arc especially 
favored now. 

GEMINI (May 2 1 lo June 20) You 
will get the green liglil now to go 
ahead with a project. The money pic- 
ture improves now. A lucky break 
comes in business. Some will receive 
an important new assignment. 
Charm and sharp thinking open 
doors this weekend. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) 
Happiness comes through children 
and creative interests. It's a great 
week- for planning a special enter- 
tainment. Doing something new 
together rejuvenates your relation- 
ship with an existing lie. Some 
singles opt for a commitment. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) 
Though new job openings come 
now, you may have trouble staying 
on top of a current project. Rise 
above distractions. The buying and 
selling of property are favored now. 
You may find a good buy on a major 
purchase for the home. Couples 
share responsibilities. 

VIRGO (August 23 to September 
22) You will be feeling highly crea- 
tive this week. Watch careless ex- 
penditure. Self-discipline brings you 
gains on the job. Charm and self-cx- 
pressiveness combine to bring you 
gains. Local travel may have roman- 
tic overtones. 



LIBRA (September 23 to October 
22) You will be making new plans 
this week that affect your domestic 
life. Money looks good now. In fact, 
this is an excellent time for financial 
dealings with others. A rclativtrmay 
be' temperamental. Familiar 
pleasures are best this weekend. . 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) You will be less 
guarded and more open with others 
this week. Your charm, charisma and 
good sense will impress those you 
deal with now. Watch absent-min- 
dedness latcrVin the week. The 
weekend brings a domestic respon- 
sibility. 

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to 
December 21) Behind-the-scenes 
developments are favorable finan- 
cially. It's a good week for reading, 
studying, and catching tip on cor- 
respondence. You may turn a hobby 
into a profit-making activity. Plan to 
visit a friend. 

CAPRICORN (December 22 to 
January 19) You will be meeting 
some very interesting people this 
week. A conservative course is best 
in business now. Unconventional 
moves aren't favored at present. You 
may be invited to a gala social event 
this weekend. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 18) Original thinking 
brings you gains in business now. 
Listen to your intuition. You will 
make a very favorable impression on 
higher-ups now. Romance also looks 
promising this week. The weekend 
finds you contemplative. 

PISCES (February 19 to March 
20) Some will receive good news 
from a lawyer, agent, or adviser. Op- 
portunity is everywhere. A surprise 
invitation for travel will delight you. 
New friends enter your life now. Ex- 
ercise sound fiscal thinking. 

©1904 by King Feature! Synd. 



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So Is Concordia 

And that means you're in the right place to take advantage 

of Concordia University's tradition of excellence at our 

new extension, conveniently located in Gurnee at the Warren 

Township High School. Earn credits toward your degree in one 

of our four fine master's programs for teachers 

or our acclaimed master's programs in 

School Counseling, Psychology, Human Services and 

Gerontology. 
Scholarships available for qualified applicants. 
For more information, call us at (708) 209-4093 



rT|r 
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CONCORDIA 
UNIVERSITY 



RIVER ♦ FOREST* ILLINOIS 



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Where To 
Eat Out 



FEATURE 

OF THE * 
WEEK 



Rosati's can please 
the whole family 

Hungry families can find something to please everyone 
at Rosati's Pizza. With two convenient locations for carry- 
out and delivery, the Scarnato family has the answer to 
today's busy schedules. 

For pizza lovers, Rosati's offers four different crusts: 
traditional thin, double dough, pan and Chicago-style deep 
dish. Any of these can be covered with a choice of 18 
delicious toppings. A selection of specialty pizzas offers 
supreme and deluxe combinations as well as a spinach 
classic and, for the gourmet, Rosati's Monster with nine 







Don't Cook -Order Take Out! 




NOW OPEN 




Not Just 4 Types Of Pizza! 



•Thin 
•Pan 



•Chicago Style Deep Dish 
•Double Dough 



ALSO 

HOMEMADE PASTAS •RIBS 

CHICKEN PARMESAN • SANDWICHES • 

SALADS • APPETIZERS • JUMBO FRIED SHRIMP 

PLUS 
Authentic Italian Groceries 

CALL US FOR FREE DELIVERY TODAY! 

Two Locations To Serve You Better 

1043 N. Milwaukee 277 Evergreen 

Ubertyville Vernon Hills 

816-9500 816-6161 



toppings piled on double dough. Unlike many other 
restaurants, Rosati's makes their dough fresh each day, and 
uses fresh vegetables rather than pre-packaged. 

Traditional pastas include Unguine, mostaccioli, ravioli, 
manicotti and baked lasagna, all with authentic homemade 
sauce. The selection of specialty sandwiches offers Italian 
beef, sausage and meatballs, as well as chicken parmigiana' 
For the lighter appetite or as a family side dish, an Italian 
tossed salad will fit the bill. 

Not in the mood for Italian? Try Rosati's famous baby 
back ribs, country fried chicken or jumbo fried shrimp. An 
exciting array of side dishes features favorite standards and 
snacks for the more discerning: stuffed jalapeno peppers, 
veggies with ranch dressing and spinach and tomato bread 
wiih mozzarclia. To top off the meal Rosati's offers Eli's 
famous chocolate chip cheesecake and cannoli, an 
authentic Italian dessert pastry filled with sweet cream. 

The Scarnato family takes pride in using the freshest 
ingredients in time-tested family recipes. The special 
cheese blend and authentic sauces make any meal special. 
For those who prefer to do their own cooking, Rosati's 
carries a full line of Italian grocery items, imported pastas, 
sauces and special condiments packaged under their 
private label. Party packages' and catering are also 
available. 

Stop by cither of the stores, located at 277 Evergreen in 
Vernon Hills, and Windmill Plaza at Rte. 21 and Winchester 
Rd. in Ubertyville. To order ahead or for delivery anywhere 
from Long Grove to Gumcc, call 816-6161 in Vernon Hills, 
or 816-9500 in Ubertyville. 



■pjnaJNN 



, FAMily Restaurant is 

pROlld TO liAVE bEEN 
) VOTEd AHONqTHE.bcST 

in LaIce Coumyl 
Come FiNd Out Why! 
Open 6:00 AM-1 1:00 PM 7 Days A Week 




E*-^ 



The 



% 94 Winner 
Of Best J 
Steak and 
Prime Rib! 



TREAT MOM TO A GREAT MEAL1 
OPEN 12-9 PM 

MOTHER'S DAY!' 

•Reservations accepted 12-4 pm only 
4-9 First Come First Served 
STEAK DINNERS NOW OPEN MONDAYS 

STARTING AT $10.95 „_ Hours: 

Mon.-Thurs. 4-10 p.m. 
Fft.-Sat. 4-11 pm, Sun. 1-9 p.m. 
YOU'RE I£ 

1818 Grand wood Dr., Gurnee 



ffipther's ^D«X O"* m p a ne Crunch 



•DiNhq Room 
•CocklAll L«j>qe 

•CATERJNq 

•Banquet F*ci!iila 



358-5200 



♦Party Plana 
AwaKaWa 



I 




313 E. U8EBTY WAUC0NDA 



(MUmikiCbampapu, Cofft, !*> 6Mtik 

FEATURESGt 

Eggs Benedict, Pancakes, Waffles, 
Bacon, Sausage, Hash Browns, Whole 
Round of Beef Caned, Whole Round 
of Ham Carved, Garlic Chicken Noodle 

COLD TABLE* 

Peel & Eal Shrimp, Whole Smoked Fish, 
Mussels, Puddings, Fresh Fruits &More 
PLCS PASTRY TABLE* 
Stmedels, Cheese Cake, Pies & More 

*14 M Adit. 

*y a d. 

MOTHER'S DAY BUFFET* 

Soup & Salad Bar, Carved Beef, Carved Ham, 
Stuffed Shells, BBQ Ribs, Roast Pork, Rice, 
Potatoes, Gravy 

A<Mt»*9** 



>/d//jf / s thin 



UllllUT' 

Scars Mansion 

"Sunn ii> "Vim 




IWilii'i Branch 
lUiuiui'i ('i-iiicr 



Catual attire, modemitly priced 
by mtrvatmn. Charge card* accepted 



SS (Eoutitrg jSqmre 

ftatmiront Be |fcnuput £[ariliiU» 

Craooui dining in ikt WttUy Stan Country Euatt 



Rta. 120 ud 45 - Grayaleke 

(708)223-0121 

Your kmtt, 

BMandKruGoixu 




Jtut 15 Miimu* wrffr-m Edm'i 




Stnriof Anmr starting at 

S ».«. TlMt-1* 

4p.M.Stn. 

I RMiiimi Jk ■ Lounge \jJ ■ ••OMW BmnCB 10-2 
^7 

GiVE MOM A BREAK! 

Reserve Now for Mother's Day Champagne Bninch. 

Sunday, May 6th - 10 a.m.-3 p.m. '12.95 Adults. *6.95 Kids 

Menu Includes: Omelettes made to order* carved 

ham & beef, smoked fish, Lox & bagels, bacon & 

sausage, dessert and salad bars. 



Frl. &. Sat. 

AU-You-Can-Eat 

PASTA BAR *7.95 

arith Salad Bar «9.9* 



live Entertainment 

Pri. k Sat Mi* In 

Our lounge 



Call (7©8) 395-480© 

40150 N. Rte. 59,-Antioch, Open to the Public 



•Breakfast-Lunch-Dinner 
•Broiled Chops, Steaks 

•Fresh Seafood •Carry Out 
•Cocktails, Beer & Wine 




; X ■ % 



1910E. GRANdAvE. 

UNdENrlURST 

556*4440 or 
J 56-4441 




0Bfr TASTE OF 

*^ CHICAGO 

WINNER! 

; Serving yon 7 doytmweek 
Happy Mother's Day! 

Bring Mom For m SenuUionmi Dinner 

On Mother's Dmyt 
Our Menu Offers Something For Everyone! 

Pizza • Heart Healthy Items • Pastas • 
Chicken • Ribs And Morel 

THE SILO 

Rt. 176, Lake Bluff 

(708) 234-6660 




RESTAURANT /&++>< HwBl tf 137* 

?loun6e 

i v a,* 




» 

» 

» 
» 



nncAKfAsr ; lunch > owwen » open ?< Ha. 



PHONE 



NICE ATMOSPHERE REASONABLE 
PRICES-FAST SERVICE 



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! 708-689-0733 1/2 mile So. of Rt. 137 on Rt. 41 1 



— • COUPON 

ONE FREE i 
ENTREE 

With tht purchtM oi another 
entree of equal or great* value. 



Limit ona coupon per vM. 

1 Coupon Per table. 

Coupon not valid with any other 

•peclal or promotion. 

Up To "8.00 

Dining Room 
Only 

Expires 5-30-94 



I"Upfd*jM\ 

^ , I 

|L_, COUPON --• 

223-7010 






Since 1977 



On Rte. 83 

Just N. Of Rollins 
Round Laic* Beach 



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B LAKELIFE lAkdANd Newspapers Mat A, 1994 



"Something 

For Everyone!" 

•Open Mother's 
Day 

«*■■■* m « • . i Wcwn Eats 
All U Can Eat Sp ecial t free * 




Mondiy 

CRAB LEGS' 



Tuesday 

BROASTED CHICKEN' 




Friday 

FRESH LAKE PERCH' 

•W U Can W- 2 fltorftn OnV 



Saturday 

2F0H1 

PRIME RIB DINNER 



Houik 

Monday-ThundayH «.m.-10p.m. 

Frid*y-S«limjty 1 1 ».m.-1 0:30 p.m. 

Sunday 1 1 * m. -0 p,m . 




"8-Valu* 



52B Rockland Road fftte. 176) 
Loko Bluff - 29B-714Q 



YAK'S HUNAN INN 



Chinese Restaurant & Lounge 




MOTHERS DM 
BUFFET 

11 a.m.-4 p.m. 

Waukegan location only. 



50 



Adults $ 7 95 Kids 4-12 $ 4 

"Comptimentary glass of wine for mom" 
Two locations <*« *f * RL I76 

tn corw van Libertyville 

to serve you 7Q8/816 , 69 g 8 



Outside Lakehunt Mall 
Waukegan 

708/473-1660 



I 




Join Us For 

Mother's Day Brunch 

Sunday -May 8 

Adults •9.99 

Children (under 10) 'S.95 

Senior Citizens ........ *5.95 

9 am til 2 pm 

• Roa»t Beef • Baked flam • Chicken 

• Aaaorted Breakfaat Item* 

• Homemade Salads • Freah Fruit 

• Swcel Table • Plua Much More 

RJ's Eatery 

& Th« Outback Bar 

1913 E. Grand Ave. ♦ Lindenhurst 

Phone 356-2300 
Open Mon.-Frl. 11 a.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a,m. 

DINE-IN ♦ CARRY OUT ♦ FREE DELIVERY 
DOUBLE DECK ♦ THIN CRUST ♦ PAN PIZZA 






JOIN US FOR 




TH E 

VILLAGE 
TAVERN 



Lunch • Dinner 

• Cocktails 
Join The Fun! 

The Village Tavern 

Jazz Band 

performs 

Every Saturday & 
Sunday Night 

WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 5 to 10 PM 

ALL YOU CAN EAT CHICKEN oni y MP" 



Friday: Old Time 
Sing Along & Famous 

All You Can Eat 
Fuh Fry ta Midnight 




Tuesdays & Thursdays - 7:30 pjn. 

Items taken on consignment 

For reservations call 

634-3117 

Old McHenry Road in Long Grove 

All major credit cards accepted 



Di Marcos offers Italian WHERE TO 

Eat Out 



feast for Mother's Day 

Located in downtown Antioch, DiMarco's Restaurant 
is committed to make your evening out a special one. 
For over 4 years now, customers have delighted in the ^| 
fine Italian cuisine that the DiMarco Family specializes in 
preparing. Mother's day is no exception to their rules of 
making only the best. 

The restaurant will be featuring a wonderful Italian 
Mother's Day buffet Patrons can choose from a large 
selection of pastas, pastries, and fresh baked breads. 
Some of the items featured arc Chicken Vesuvio, sausage 
and peppers, baked clams, stuffed artichokes, calamari 
fritta, mussels marinara, linguine with white clam sauce, 
Italian Salads, Italian Breads, and a tremendous table full 
of pastries. 

Although it Is traditional for the DiMarco family to 
feed their customers abundantly year round, Donna says 
she is certain this will be a feast to remember.' 

The meal is all you can eat at $13.95 for adults, $7.95 
for children 10 and under, while children 3 and under 
dine for free. There will be four searings only, available at 
11:30 km., 1:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 5:30 p.m. Owner Donna 
DiMarco's brother, Tony, will personally carve the ham 
at every seating. 

Reservations arc a requirement, so patrons arc asked 
to get their calls in early for a feast that Is sure to satisfy 
any hungry palate. DiMarco's is located at 883 Main 
Street and can be reached at 395-8883. DiMarco's is 
regularly open at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday; at 4 p.m. on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, and 
is closed on Mondays. 



FEATURE 
OF THE 
WEEK - 




®i omnAca A 




**>* l/ 2 Fin*" ll.iji.in Cur 

MOTHER'S DAY 
BUFFET 

4 Seatings Only 

11:30 - 1:30 - 3:30 - 5:30 

Reservations Only 

$ 13.95 Adults 

$ 7.95 Children Under 10 
Under 3 Free 



Tues.-Thurs. 5:00 

Frl.-Sun. 4:00 

Closed Monday 

Banquets Available 

Accepting Reservations 

Enjoy Out OlaSiou Feaat 

833 Main Street 

Antioch, IL 

395-8883 



Fish Boil 
Every Friday 

| Served 5:00-9:00 p.m. 
►Soup 
►Salad Bar 

►3 Varieties of Fish Plus One Special Entree 
•Fresh Rye & Cinnamon Rolls 

Only $^95 

4 All You Can Eat 



HIMER COIMRV CLIB 

54 1 9 Kenosha St, $ ]1T , Slt fo! , on?f \ 7 
(815)678-2631 Richmond. I L 



Tke> Siii Mandarin 

Champagne Brunch _£. 

7J| Serving 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. B?* 

Appetizer: Crabmeat w/Cheese, Shrimp Toast, Egg Roll, «*— 
House Special or Hot & Sour & Eggdrop Soup /t» 



En tree: •GcneralTw Chicken 
•Scallop w/Opter Sauce 
•Chicken wMsoiud Vegetife 
•Shrinpw/fcpangiB 
•ScwmePori 
•Swa& Pungent Bed 

95 



T*$12' 



•Fish Filet w/Hunan Spicy Sauce 

•Fried Zucchini 

•Shrimp Fried Rice 

•BBQ Pock Chow Mdn ' 

•Almond Jel to, F<ah Fruit, 
Tea & Fortune CooUea 



O 



MSCFREE 



$6 



95 






under \JL 



4 E. Phillip Road (On Rl. 60, 1 mile W. of Milwaukee Ave;) 
!■ VemonHiUi '680-1760 JJ 



(f^^££* NOW OPIN 
^^v^^^ FRIDAY EVENING 



^v 



Take Mom To 
Breakfast 

or Lunch 

On Mother i Day 



FOR DINNER! 

4:30 to 8:30 p.m. 



•Fish Fry •Ribs 
•Delicious Steaks 
•Pasta & More 




Open Tues, 
Thru Sun." 



COUNTRY 

RESTAURANT 

Bakery * Country Store * Orchard * Greenhouse 

300S.m.8!-!flMi.N.o(Midlo4imlid Miaitkin, 1 !(!«) 5664S20 



THE DEAN TAGGART FAMILY 






*£? 



€*iliiuT ill a ct l> 



illautiv 



c 






^ 



"Loc&udin beautiful downtown Cttmtr' 

438-0300 

FRIDAY BESTmS 

FISH FRY "A FAMILY IN TOWN 

RESTAURANT" 

OPEN 7 DAYS 

Lunch & Dinner 

Breakfast on Sundays 

Children's Portions & Prices 




Gilmer & Midlothian Roads • Mundelein, Illinois 60060 



••.i<»r ' 







M*y A, 19 



kElANd NcwspapCRS LAKEUFE 




Alaska 



From page Bll 

because their houses were too 
hot, which, for Mary, was any- 
thing above the 40 degrees of her 
cabin. 

Lake County endured a few 
January days where temperatures 
plummeted to equal Anvik's, 
which hovered around 50 below. 
However, most homes in this 
area arc heated to 65 degrees or 
higher; McDonald's cabin tem- 
perature never got above a chilly 
40 degrees, 

McDonald developed an 
appreciation and respect for the 
people of Anvik. "They had a 
genuine , graciousness about 
them that is very non-controll ing. 
They did n't .want anything from 
you. Here, too often people try to 
manipulate others in order to get 
what they want It's like the dif- 
ference between talking to a 
salesman bran old friend. In 
Anvik, there are: no salesman. 
They are all friends," he 
explained. 



"So much of what gets told 
about the villages is only the 
problems, the alcoholism, the 
dysfunctional families, when 
there is also so much good," 
McDonald stated. 

The villagers live off the land 
by hunting moose and fishing for 
King Salmon, "Their whole 
rhythm of life is different," 
McDonald said. "Wc tend to 
manipulate time in order to 
structure our lives. In their cul- 
ture, you don't manipulate the 
environment, you participate in 
it's rhythms. For example, you 
fish when the fish go upstream; ' 
you hunt when the moose arc 
running; and you wake when the 
sunrises." 

The hardest thing to adjust to 
was the lack of sunshine, " 
McDonald admitted. 
Home Sweet Village 

Despite the adverse weather, 
the community was close knit 
and relied on their own creativity 
for entertainment. ' "Almost 



Where To 
Eat Out 



FEATURE 

OF THE 

WEEK 




Dairq 
Queen 



brazier 
HotEats 

CoOL/RfATS 

MAY 



CLIP AND SAVE- mimb 

DAIRY QUEEN OF 
ANTIOCH 

. DQ SOFT SERVE ITEMS* 

YOGURT -HOT FOOD 

HARD ICE CREAM - NOVELTIES < 

SOFT DRINKS -CAKES, 

PIES AND LOGS 



ALL SALES START ON MON. & END FRI. 



MM 



15 



22 



29 



mm 



mm 



IQNSMT 



imui 



mwi 



2. 3 4 5 6 

Hot Fudge Brownie Delight 99 « 
Nachos 99 * 



"S| "lOj 11] 121 

Chili Dog 99« 
16 os. Shake 994 



13 



16f \7\ is| «| 



17| 1B| 

BBQ '1.19 
Stmwberry Short Cake 



20 



99* 



"S| 24| 25| 26J 27 
1/4 f Super Dog *1.09 
13. os. Dllssard 99 * 



M «l 4 2 I 



m 

PoUah 



•1.09 



31 os. rloat/Freese *1.39 



fiUUUMI 



14 



21 



26 



♦FREE CAKE DRAWING 

EVERY FRIDAY - MUST REGISTER 
EVERY WEEK. LIMIT ONE PER VISIT 



Your Choice OfNon-Fat Frozen Yogurt Or 
DQ Soft Servo For All Products 

966 Main St., Antioch 
395-8383 



everyone owned a snowmobile; 
and rode It around town. Kids 
spent hours playing In the snow," 
McDonald said. He taught the 
kids how to make snow angels, 
since they had never heard of 
them. 

McDonald kept in touch with 
his family through weekly phone 
calls. He had to use a public 
phone on a porch outside of the 
Washatcrla to call, which was 
simitar to calling from ah outside 
phone in thedcad of winter.. 
Homecoming 

. Returning -home, McDonald 
said he was happy to he back with 
his wife and kids. He stays In 
contact with people in Anvik, and 
may arrange to. have them send 
hand made baskets to be sold at a 
church bazaar. 

McDonald thoroughly enjoyed 
his mission. "1 really felt like I 
was the one that was supposed to 
. be there," he stated. "My listen- 
ing skills were put to good use as 



I heard the communities' real 
hurts and joys and struggles." 

He admitted that he had to 
readjust to life In Libcrtyvillc after 
being in an area with some sen- 
sory deprivation, "It seemed like; 
there was too much here — too 
much noise and too much traffic, 



too many people and too many 
things. "I really gained an appro-, 
elation for my family and my 
friends here," McDonald stated. 
"The biggest lesson I learned was 
that life can be lived very simply." 
And that adventures are worth 
pursuing. 



Adler Center 



From page Bll 

field work projects and confer- 
ences on folk music 

"The Center grow to represent 
a lot of different art forms and 
helped make it a lot easier for the 
public to come into contact with 
them," said Mmer.?V. 

After David had served a year 
as executive director of the Adler 
Center, the Millers had an oppor- 
tunity to join Folklore Village 
Farms. 

They really enjoy the slower 
pace of a small town environ- 



ment. The Folklore Center is a 50- 
acrc site about 6 miles from 
Dodgcvilic offering a broad range 
of traditional folk arts arid folk 
ways. 

Most of their music is from 
the 1«50 to 1935, with a few 
newer pieces thrown In. ' 

Tickets for the concert are 
available at the Center, 1700 N. 
Milwaukee Ave.- Admission is $8 
for adults and $i> for Adler mem- 
bers, senior citizens and children 
under 16. For tickets or more 
information call 367-0707. 



Enjoy a cool treat at Antioch Dairy Queen 




The Dairy Queen of Antioch has been serving the 
community with great food and Dairy Queen soft-serve 
ice cream treats since 1955. For the last six years it has 
been owned and operated by Pat and John Halvorscn 
and son David Matcja. The store was completely 
remodeled in 1988 and many new menu items have 
been added. 

the newest item is the D.Q. frozen cake program. 
This includes DQ frozen cakes, blizzard pics and logs. 
They have these great-tasting items ready-made for you 
in the freezer or you can call and order one decorated 
with just about any design you Would like. 



• Dairy Queen also has a program for your non-profit 
organization to raise money through the sale of D.Q. 
frozen cakes. Contact Pat at 395-8383 for more informa- 
tion. 

Along with all the great soft-serve products, they arc 
now serving soft frozen yogurt and sugar-free, fat-rfrcc 
hard ice cream for those who watch their diets. All the 
DQ favorites arc available in cither soft-serve or yogurt: 
sundaes,, shakes, and royal treats as well as cake or waf- 
fle cones. Those who love soft-serve Blizzards and 
yogurt Breezes will find three new flavors: peanut but- 
ter and jelly, fudge pecan brownie, and cherry cheese- 
cake. Everyone will also find their favorite DQ novelties. 

Besides ice cream treats, Dairy Queen ofTers foot-long 
hot dogs, regular hot dogs, Polish sausage, BBQ sandwich- 
es, chips, nachos and soft drinks. The Full Meal Deals for 
adults and children arc sure to please. Watch for the daily 
specials and be sure not to miss the DQ boodi at the Taste 
ofAntiochJuly21-23. 

During the spring, DQ is open Sunday through 
Thursday 1 1:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., until 9:30 p.m. on Friday 
and Saturday. Summer hours begin when school lets 
out; the restaurant is open until 10 p.m. Sunday through 
Thursday and until 10:30 on Friday and Saturday. 

Stop in at 9G6 Main St. and lunch on the patio or in 
the evening have a treat after dinner or a show. Call 395- 
8383 now to order your cake for any occasion. 



y 



Htdtiw't Dot/ 
Speciat 



Treat Your Mom To Dinner 

At Red Noodle Restaurant At A Price 

You Can Afford & You'll StiU Have 

Money Left Over For A 

Homemade Dessert! 

PASTA PERFECT DINNERS 

Complete meals with your choice of spaghetti, 
mostaccloli or vermicelli "ala Red Noodle". Hot 
crusty garlic bread and soft drink or coffee. 

Every Tuesday, Thurtday and Sunday evening. Everyday for Lunch 
Ne SubttltuHflm 



ONLY 



*2. 



No Substitution! 



N - AMlHlCAN 
DININl. 



ON RTE. 83 JUST NORTH OF ROLLINS 
ROUND LAKE BEACH 



223-7010 



Mothers Day 

Dinner Served 

12 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

at the 

WILD GQDSE CAFE 

If you don't bring mom to 

the Wild Goose Cafe for 

Mother's Day, she'll be 

mad., and if you think 

your Mom's the best, treat 

her to the best Lake 

County has to offer. 

Call for reservations 
949-5550 A 

WILD GOOSE CAFE ^ 

is located at 21 190 Gilmer Road, 

100 yards southeast of 

Midlothian 

(35 miles northwest of RL 83) 




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COUNTY LAkeUd Newspapers M*y 6, 1 994 



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*^> JWother's Bag fH 



Lakeland 

Newspapers* 



Relive family memories this Mother's Day May 8 




Just about the time Itiat the first wild 
flowers were blooming on the West 
Virginia countryside 86 years ago, the 
very first modern Mother's Day was cel- 
ebrated In Grafton In a remote country 
church that was forever to become a 
national shrine dedicated to American 
and eventually. International mother- 
hood. 

The Idea for Mother's Day, as we 
know It, was Inspired by Anna Reeves 



Jarvls, transplanted from her native 
state to Philadelphia, where her own 
mother died In 1906. The memory of all 
her mother stood for lead her to a cru- 
sade to establish Mother's Day as a per- 
petual tribute, not Just to her revered 
mother, but to all mothers all over the 
world. 

She ar mounced her vision to a 
group of friends that were gathered to 
observe the first anniversary of her 
mother's demise. In the ensuing year, 
she enlisted the help of civic organiza- 
tions and business leaders to help. her 
bring her concept Into being. Chief 
among her protagonists was John 
Wanamaker, the Philadelphia mer- 
chant prince and philanthropist, who 
campaigned with her to "make 
Mother's Day happen." 

And so It was Just a year later In 1 908 
that Grafton, West Virginia, came to be 
the host town for the first Mother's Day. 



It didn't take long for the Mother's 
Day Idea to take off. By 1910, Gov. 
William Glassman had declared 
Mother's Day to be a West Virginia 
Stat© holiday. And then, just three years 
loter, 6<r. egress made It a national holi- 



day to be observed In al the states and 
territories. Finally, In 1914, President 
Woodrow Wilson issued the first presi- 
dential proclamation to mark the day. 
So don't you forget the day— Sunday, 
May 81 




Where Quality Children's Clothing Needn't Be Expensive! 

730 East Rollins Road • Mallard Croak Shopping Cantor - Round Lako Baaeh, Illinois 60073 

708-546-0117 



Q&mk (Mfflf Candies 



Mother's Day Is 
Sunday - Remember 

Mom With 




LB. COLONIAL ASSORTMENT ^MMU£ cMmIU* Candy 

^ $ 14.95 

(Reg. '20.95) 

The Prescription Drug Store 

426 N. Milwaukee Ave. • Liber lyville, IL 
Telephones: 362-2005 & 362-1288 




'^Happenings at 
/tI^steakai 





We Have Lots Of 
Beautiful Ways To Say 
Happy Mother's Day." 

Stop by Ralph's Florist and Greenhouse for 
a wide selection of Mother's Day gifts ideas: 

/ • Cut Flower Arrangements 

• Blooming Plants 
• Roses • Green Plants 
Annuals & Perennials for Mom's Garden 

• Gift Certificates Available 



Ralph's 



Florist & Greenhouse 
InFoxLake 587-8244 . In Round Lake 546-2185 Toll Free: 1-800-546-7116 



AND SEAFOOD HOUSE 



<\ fj?'0- Mother's Day Champagne 

.Vri.^ ^ Brunch Served 10 a.m.-2:00 p.m. 




•it 



40 items plus Prime Rib 

$£95 

Adults U Children 

Special Dinner Menu 
Starts At 12 Noon 

1/2 mite North of Rt 173 on U.S. 12 Richmond, JL 

(815)678-2671 





Special Mother's Day 

Breakfast Buffet Brunch 
Adults '8.50 - Kids '3,95 

Under J -FREE 
Served 9 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 

•Complete Pancake Bar 
•Eggs & Omelettes made to order in dining room 
»Fresh Fruit •Homemade Coffee Cake & Pastries 
►Wide variety of meats& breakfastentrees 




Serving a s 
Mother's Day 
Dinner Menu 

featuring lib. cold water lobster tail, 
prime rib of beef, baked bone in ham, & 
Longborn } sfamousBBQribsanda wide 

variety of steaks, chops & fresh seafood. 






* V 



OnRi. 120-2 1/2 miles Wesl of Rt. 12 on Lily Lake just 10 minutes west of Giayslake 

(815)385-9869 





Midtane Country CfuS u 

Sunday (May 8, 1994 from 11:00 to 230 

250 feet of T^ant "Buffets & Ice ScuCpturts 

Appetizers & Salads 

Over 12 varieties including Waldorf, Tortetfim, Antipasto, 
Seafood andTasta, Toadied '& Smoked Salmon. 

Classic "Entrees 

Over 25 varieties including (Roast Lamb, 

Barron of (Beef, (Baked Mam & Chicken Specialties, 

'Eggs (Benedict, Cheese (Bliintzes, Western French Toast, 

& Custom Omelettes. 

(Extravagant Sweets 

Tones, Mini 'Eclairs, Cream (Buff Swans, Napoleons, 
"Dipped fruits, Cakes, Coof&s &9dare 

The Children's Quffet 

Just for kids with (Pizza, Chicken (Drumettes, grilled 

Cheese, Jello & Higglers Just for Starters 

Avoid Last year's Setbut ... Observe Today 

$1 7.95 for Mutts & $8.95 Children Ages 4 to 9 

fftddlane Country CQ16 • 14565 'ybrlfouse flfc£ * Wadswortfi, IC 
Incfudes Champagne Mimosa Toast and Coffee Service 
ft fc Ttease addTati an d Qratwuj to stated price. *A 

\ IV TfeasepOone 708-36OOS50 ■ /% f 

* h e II Rememb* 



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Max 6, If 94 UkclANd Newspapers COUNTY I 








architect aims to keen 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 



Staff Reporter . 

He's a lifelong Lake County 
resident who earned a 5-ycar pro- 
fessional bachelor's degree in 
architecture from the University 
of Detroit and lived and studied 
architecture In Europe for a year. 

At age 24, Lenny Enz has 
returned home and is now work- 
ing and teaching in Lake County 
in the hopes of bringing Pine 
architecture back to what he 
called the "corridors of ugliness." 

As one of the fastest growing 
counties in the country, Lake 
County is also quickly resorting 
to the ordinary to accommodate 
for its growdi. 

What was once a county 
noted for its rural and open char- 
acter is now becoming a county 
filled with subdivisions of homes 
that look attractive but, at the 
same time, generally look the 
same. 

"I must take pride in where I 
live," said Enz, who said the great 
cities of America are recognized 
for their architecture above any- 
thing else. 

New York City and Chicago, 
for example, arc noted for their 
architecture, theater and art, he 
said. 

"Why are people so proud of 
Chicago?" asked Enz, "Those 
buildings represent thd*City of 
Chicago." 

That commitment to self and 



community is exactly what he 
tries to instill in his first-year 
design students at the College of 
Lake County. 

As a semester-long exercise 
for his students, Enz,. who also 
works for Legat Architects In 
Waukegan, had his students 
design a new Gurncc fire station, 
paralleling the one which Is cur- 
rently-being designed. by Dan 
Robison Architects. 

He asked his students to bal- 
ance aesthetics with functionali- 
ty. At the same time, students 
were reminded that the fire sta- 
tion was a public entity that rep- 
resented the Gurnce community 
and people.. 

Some thought of the fire sta- 
tion as a beacon or a place of 
refuge. Others incorporated the 
elements of earth, wind, fire and 
water into their design features, 
while others embodied the sur- 
rounding rural motif with a bam- 
like design. 

"Architecture is something 
that represents that community," 
Enz said. "It has to start at the 
local level." 

He said local residents don't 
realize the power they possess to 
decide what they want their com- 
munity look like. He pointed to 
Lake Forest and Libcrtyville as 
places where the residents have 
taken stock in the overall look of 
their community. 




A student's idea 

Frank Wats of, Lake Villa points out his design features for a new Gumee fire station. College of Lake 
County architectural design instructor Lenny Enz had his students present design alternatives for the 
proposed fire stattlon In Gumee. The students were critiqued by Enz. who Is also employed by Legat 
Architects In Waukegan; Gumee Fire Chief, Tim McGrath; Dan Robison, architect of the new fire sta- 
tion; and Arthur DelMuro, an architect with Legat Archletcts.— Photo by Kovfn Hanrahan 



"Architecture should be a 
noble cause rather than lining the 
pockets of developers," Enz said. 
"The dollar reigns over the living 
conditions." 

Me said developers build their 
subdivisions and then depart for 
their next contract And they gen- 



erally don't live in the areas 
where they build. 

"Today, a select few make the 
decisions for a community," Enz 
said. "So, it's really up to a com- 
munity to take the initiative." 

After living in Poland for sue 



months, Enz said he really came 
to appreciate America and the 
capacity of its people to make a 

difference. 

"I live here," said Enz, "and 1 
just want Lake County to look 
beautiful." 



Habitat for Humanity seeks used building materials 



This year, as citizens dig into 
Spring Clean-Up projects, think 
of Habitat for Humanity before 
setting discarded items out for 
garbage pick up. With. Habitat's 
recycling program, cast-offs can 
help build a dream for some Lake 
'County family in desperate need 
of safe and adequate housing. 



Habitat for Humanity is an 
ecumenical housing ministry 
which builds homes using volun- 
teer tabor and donated materials.. 
The homes are sold to people in 
need for approximately $40,000 
at no profit and with no interest. 

Since 1989, Habitat for 
Humanity Lake County, has built 



Republican Club plans preserve tour 

The Women's Republican Club of Lake Forest/Lake Bluff plans a 
"Know Lake County's Forest Preserves" tour on Wednesday, May 25. 
Tour sites will include: The Fort Sheridan Forest Preserve and a resi- 
dential home, guided by Ron Guenthy, Libertyvillc's thousand acre 
preserve and a meeting with the landscape architect for an overview of 
the future plans, on to the Dcs Plaincs River Trail, and the Old School 
Area, Wrightwood, and ending with lunch at Rycrson Woods and a pre- 
sentation given by the director of Lake County Forest Preserve, Steve 
Mcsscrli. 

The bus will leave at 9:15 a.m. from behind the Dccrpath Junior 
II igh School, returning to the same site at 2:30 p.m. Tour and box lunch 
cost is $30. 

For reservations, mail a check to: Women's Republican Club of Lake 
Forest/Lake Bluff, P.O. Box 617, Lake Forest, IL 60045. Reservations will 
be accepted in the order received. Dress in walking shoes. 



10 homes in North Chicago, 
Waukegan and Zion. They plan to 
build 6 homes in 1994. 
v Habitat's Used Building 
Material Recycling Program 
accepts a variety of donated 
items. Items include windows, 
doors, sinks, toilets, cabinets, 
light fixtures, paint, tile, usable 
lumber, tools, counter tops and 
more. They do not accept dona- 
tions of furniture, but appliances 
arc accepted on a limited basis, 



Whenever possible, these items 
arc used in the construction of 
Habitat homes. The rest arc sold 
at a monthly Building Materials 
Sale. Proceeds from these sales 
arc expected to entirely fund a 
new home by the end of 1994. 

Your material donations to 
Habitat for Humanity Lake 
County arc tax deductible and a 
receipt will be provided upon 
request 

Material donations arc 



accepted on the first and third 
Saturday of every month from 
9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the 
Lorrell Business Center on Skokic 
Hwy. (Hwy. 41) in North Chicago, 
exactly one mile south of Rtc. 137 
and one mile north of Rtc. 176. 
Sales take place at the same loca- 
tion and same time on the first 
Saturday only. Limited pick-ups 
arc available. Call the Habitat 
office at 623-1020 for more infor- 
mation. 



Friends of Ryerson Woods receive national award 



The National Association of 
Interpreters (NAI), named the 
Lake County Forest Preserve 
"Friends of Ryerson Woods" 
citizen support group as 
recipient of the NAI 
Appreciation Award. The award 
was presented at the Region V, 
NAI conference held in March 
in Minneapolis, Minn. The NAI 
is a professional society of 
historical and nature educators, 
representing agencies as diverse 



as Forest Preserves and the 
National Park Service. 

The NAI Appreciation Award 
honors an organization that has 
responded in an exceptional 
manner by making major 
contributions to benefit 
historical and nature programs 
and facilities. Selected from 
nominees from throughout the 
midwest, the Friends of Ryerson 
Woods support group was given 
the award this vear because of 



their outstanding contributions 
in support of education and 
preservation projects at the 
Ryerson Conservation Area near 
Deerfield. The group also 
spearheaded development of 
Exhibit Cabins and self-guided 
nature nails' at Ryerson Woods • 
For information on 
becoming a member of the 
Friends of Ryerson Woods, 
contact Nan Buckardt at 948- 
7753, ext. 216. 






Shied &IA, €ut ot dotted *9&me Qfawod* <? cHuen oHote/ 
(Ci(o3t items can 6t> petsona&McdJ 
k oHom, f-6*mt &—-9X 104p—t <** 9-5 jmv <ft» // «•» - 4^m 



X cr An Lnfcrjettafcle 

Meal, Bring Yciir Special 

Laay To 

TERRY'C 

Mexican Restaurant. 

"She deserves to be appreciated" 

Menu for Mother's Day Includes: 

Paella, SurfSi Turf, Strip Sirloin Roast or Steak, Cajun Pork Roast, 

Chipotle Roasted Duckling or Chicken and a Variety of Fish and Our Reg. Menu. 




ERRV 



S 



We Ml Be Open 

Hrs.11:30a.nv4:30p.m. 

On Mother's Day 



MEXICAN 

RESTAURANT 

325 N. SEYMOUR • MUNDELEIN, IL 60060 

566-9530 

HRS. M-FrL1 1-1 p.m. 

Sat. 12-10 p.m. 




». — I * I i IN *» ■■ * f. fc- fl. ■■ * IK. * 



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1 HEALTHWATCH UWancI Newspapers Max 6, 1 994 



CoNclfll Medic aI 
Center 



Caregivers support 

Condcll Medical 
Center's Caregivers Support 
Group will meet at 7 p.m., 
the fourth Tuesday of every 
month at the Allen Condcll 
Day Center for 
Intcrgcncrational Care in 
Ubcrtyvillc. Anyone who is 
responsible for giving care 
to elderly, infirm, or dis- 
abled family members arc 
invited to attend. Call 816- 
4584 for information. 

We Need Each Other 

."We Need Each Other", a 
support group for people 
with chronic pain and their 
families at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Allen Conference Center at 
Condcll Medical Center in 
Libcrtyvillc. The group 
meets the third Tuesday of 
each month. For informa- 
tion call 680-1092. 



Sl.IlltKLSt 

HospiiAl 



Narcotics Anonymous 

Will meet every 
Wednesday, 7 to 9 p.m., in 
the Physician's Dining 
Room. Call 360-2649 

Alcoholics Anonymous 

Meets every Tuesday and 
Friday, 7 to 8 p.m., in the 
Private Dining Room. Call 
360-2649 

Smoke Free 

A support group will 
meet every Thursday, 7 to 8 
p.m., at the Heart Center of 
Lake County. Call 360-2247. 

Oncology 

Meets every second and 
fourth Monday of each 
month, 7 p.m., on the 6th 
floor (B side). Call 244-5900. 



Vic K)R\ MemorUI 
Hospiul 



Screenings 

Every Monday except 
holidays, 8 a.m. to noon, 
Free Blood Pressure 
Screening and Recording 
offered in the Chapel at 
Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center, 1055 East 
Grand Avenue, Lindenhurst. 
Call (708) 356-5900 for in- 
formation. 

Respite adult day care 

Arc provided on an '■' 
hourly, daily, or weekly basis 
at the Victory Adult Day 
Center, 360-9860 and 
Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center, Lindenhurst, 
356-5900. Call for informa- 
tion on services and costs. 



HS ( ioocI Sin plu iuI 
Hoshiixl 



Alcoholics 
Anonymous 

EHS Good Shepherd 
Hospital hosts an open 
Alchololics Anonymous (AA), 
meeting at 5:30 p.m. every- 
Saturday for AA newcomers 
and anyone interested in 
learning more about the 
family disease of alco- 
holism. Sessions arc held in 
the Access Group Room of 
the hospital. For more 
infomration call 381-0123, 
extv5400. 



Health care reform doesn't have to mean a new system 



Security is one of the major 
buzzwords in the current health 
care reform debate, but the 
details of reform appear to be 
making many people feel a lot 
less secure. As more information 
about the various reform propos- 
als comes out, there may be less 
support for drastic changes. 

Early in the health care reform 
discussion, opinion polls found 
that most Americans thought the 
nation's health care system need- 
ed top-to-bottom reform. After 
more than a year's worth of facts, 
figures, and debate, that senti- 
ment may have changed. A recent 
American Viewpoint survey 
found that 69 percent of those 
questioned thought parts of the 
health care system needed Fixing 



rather than putting a whole new 
system in place. 

Ross Perot is fond of saying, 
"the devil is in the details," .and as 
far as health care reform is con- 
cerned, that may be true. When 
President Clinton's plan was first 
unveiled it garnered widespread 
support, but after several months 
if "tire kicking" Americans seem 
less inclined to buy it. Numerous 
polls have shown that support for 
the president's proposal has been 
steadily eroding. 

A recent survey of Illinois resi- 
dents' opinions on just one 
aspect of the Clinton plan uncov- 
ered a .'great deal of doubt. The 
Chicago- based Rabin Research 
company found that the pro- 
posed Regional Health Alliances 



were opposed by 85 percent of 
those who were questioned. 
Fifty-eight percent said they had 
very little confidence that the 
government can efficiently run 
the alliances, which would have 
tremendous regulatory and 
financial responsibilities. 

"It seems that, while people 
generally like the idea of reform 
they would just as soon not have 
government meddling with their 
own health care matters," said 
Ted Dcsch, senior vice president 
of Rluc Cross and Blue Shield of 
Illinois, which commissioned the 
survey. 

Other surveys in recent weeks 
have found that people have 
many doubts about' whether 
health care reform will cost 



them more money, improve the 
quality of care they receive, 
reduce paperwork hassles and 
in general make them better off 
than they arc now. The opinion 
polls, however continue to show 
that Americans arc genuinely 
concerned about those who 
don't have access to health 
insurance. 

"The trick is to come up with a 
reform plan that addresses the 
serious problems in the health 
care system without destroying 
those things that work well," said 
Dcsch. "Insurance reform docs 
that and it's something that can 
be accomplished quickly." 

Eliminating the restrictions 
that some insurers have for prc- 
See REFORM page B25 



H E ALTH WATCH 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Home Care can be first-line offensive 



"I think all of us in health care 
should begin to view the role of 
home care differently. Why don't 
wc view health care primarily as 
starting in the home and ending 
up in the hospital only after earli- 
er measures fait?" DepcndiCarc 
President Roger Miller said here 
at the Illinois I lomc Care Council 
conference, "Home Health Care: 
Effective Managed Care 
Strategics." 

Miller placed the home health 
care industry squarely in the van- 
guard of the cost containment 
fight by saying that home health 
care may eventually become part 
of die beginning rather than only 
the end of the health care delivery 
process in order to further con- 
trol costs. However, to fulfill this 
potential, he said, the industry 
needs to institute some of the 
changes that hospitals and insur- 
ance companies have already 
pioneered. 

He noted that the Clinton 
Administration's proposed 

reform plan calls for all 
Americans to be enrolled in giant 
buying groups that would negoti- 
ate the lowest possible prices for 
medical services. Out insurance 
companies and hospitals have 
already achieved reforms on their 
own, outside of legislation, that 
have resulted in significant cost 
efficiencies and savings as well as 
competitive advantages, he said. 
"All of these reforms by the 
hospitals and the payors lead us 
to the reforms wc also need with- 
in home care not only to survive 
in this changing environment, 
but to thrive in it," he said. "Even 
though home care is a relatively 
young industry, we must reform!" 
Hospitals and insurance com- 
panies have formed their own 
alliances to better address specif- 
ic market needs and to expand 
market access, he noted.- Shared 
data, more sophisticated market- 
ing approaches and managed 
care through HMOs, PPOs, pay- 
ment caps and other initiatives 
have shrunk the number of hos- 
pital inpatient days and stream- 
lined the health care delivery sys- 
tem in general, he said. 

Miller outlined several critical 
changes necessary for the home' 
health care industry to accom- 
plish the same goals and to make 
it more accessible and responsive 
to the other parts of the health 

■ 



care system. 

Home Care companies need 
to consolidate, he said, and per- 
haps affiliate with hospitals and 
home care networks, to achieve 
cost efficiencies and form com- 
plete "one-stop shopping" orga- 
nizations. 

I lomc Care companies should 
also develop managed care 
agreements that create payment 
caps, and learn to offer not sim- 
ply "high quality" but "best 
value" — discounted prices under 
managed care plans that provide 
the services the customers want, 
Miller said. "In order to do that 
well wc arc going to have to ask a 
lot of questions and do a lot of 
careful listening," he said. "1 am 
sure that home care companies 
will achieve acceptable prof- 
itability at whatever level of ser- 
vices patients and the payors 
need." 

Computers should be used not 
just as a bookkeeping tool, but as 
a vital clement in carrying out 
these strategics, he said. 
Internally, computer systems will 
aid in the management and uti- 
lization of products and services 
in the care of patients, Miller said. 
Externally, they will be a key cle- 
ment in the growing exchange of 
data that helps payors under- 
stand home care operations and 
benefits while helping" them 
manage their own business. 

Finally, Miller said he believes 
that many treatment programs 
that arc home based may be 
found more effective than similar 
hospital-based plans. He offered 
his own father as an example. 
"My father, who suffers from 
leukemia, has made remarkable 
progress once the hospital agreed 
to let him go home to recover 
from his two chemotherapy treat- 
ments," he said. 

If the industry takes advantage 
of the home setting by imposing 
the self-reforms hospitals and 
payors have already undertaken, 
Miller said, home care could 
become part of the first rather 
than the last step in the treatment 
process, reserving hospitals for 
those patients who truly need 
their help. 

He acknowledged that the 
understanding of payors and 
physicians with regard to home 
health care would have to be 
broadened so that all concerned 



would be comfortable with the 
level of care capable of being pro- 
vided in the home, 

"But I have met some of the 
best, most dedicated clinicians 1 
have ever known in the home 
care field," Miller said. "Home 
Care professionals arc ready to 
tackle anything health care 
reform can throw our way. In 
fact, to borrow a phrase from a 
popular musical rocker of a few 
years back, I think our future's so 
bright wc gotta wear shades." 

The U.S. home health care 
industry has been growing at an 
annual rate of more than 20 per- 
cent because of its unique ability 



to provide quality care and vastly 
improved patient quality of life at 
dramatically less cost than hospi- 
talization. 

DepcndiCarc provides a full 
range of respiratory services, 
infant and pediatric services, 
ventilator management, enteral 
nutrition and durable medical 
equipment.. It was recently 
named to the HOMECARE 100, 
the industry's listing of the 
nation's largest home health care 
companies. The company is 
headquartered in Broadview, III., 
with services throughout the 
Chicago area and northern 
Illinois. 



Write Us 



Lakeland Newspapers wants to hear news 
of local sporting events, clubs, organiza- 
tions, etc. Black and white photos are also 
welcome. Please send news Items to 
Claudia M. Lenart 30 S. Whitney, Grayslake, 
60030 or call 223-8161. 




The problem of Chemical 
Dependency doesn't go away. 

When you pretend your alcohol or drug problem doesn't exist, 

you're only fooling yourself. At Victory Memorial Hospital's 

Chemical Dependency Programs, we know that even though * 

alcohol and drug addiction are destructive diseases, there is a high 

potential for recovery with treatment. 

Just hoping the problem Will go away isn't enough. 

Take the first step towards recovery, call us today for a 

confidential assessment at 

(708) 688-HELP, 24 hours a day. 



\yy 



VICTORY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

1324 N. Sheridan Road . Waukegan, IL 

Victory's Outpatient Chemical Dcpetidency Programs are also 

available at 2031 E. Grand Ave., Suite 200, Lindenhurst, Illinois 

Call (708) 356-9685. 

A Total Quality Stuna^tmmt OrxanizutUm 





M*y 6, If 94 UIcejai 




apcrs HEALTH WATCH [ 




Active children need the right fuel 



As the weather starts to warm 
up, children arc exchanging win- 
ter gloves and snow boots for 
baseball mitts and soccer cleats. 
Warmer weather opens up a vari- 
ety of activities for kids who have 
spent a long winter playing 
indoors. With this increase in 
activity, a nutritious diet Is 
important for adequate energy 



after a meal before rigorous exer- 
cise. To make the most of physi- 
cal activity, the body needs to 
properly digest food to provide 
adequate energy. 

Children need to cat a meal or 
snack after a long period of play. 
It is important for children to 
restore muscle and liver energy 
reserves after playing. This 



and growth. The American Heart enables the body to reenergize. 



Association of Metropolitan 
Chicago offers parents the follow- 
ing tips for healthy and energetic 
children: 

Children should cat breakfast 
every day within an hour of wak- 
ing. After a long night's sleep, 



bits 

,1/4 1. hot pepper sauce (opt.) 
3 T. dry-roasted finely 

crushed nuts 

Cook's note: Soft "light" cream 
cheese is packaged in a tub con- 
tainer.- It Is sold in the dairy case 
of your supermarket. 

Instructions: Rinse celery 
stalks and dry with paper towels. 
Put stalks on cutting board. With 




Carbohydrates arc the body's 
main source of energy. Sources of small sharp knife, trim leafy parts 
carbohydrates include fruits, veg- 
etables, low-fat milk and dairy 
products, beans and legumes, 
whole-grains and cereals. 

The AHA-MC recommends 



children need to replenish their trying the following low-fat 



energy store to start the day. 

Parents should serve three 
meals, a day and Include in- 
between snacks. Eating four to six 
times a day provides essential 
nutrients from all the food 
groups: bread and cereals, fruits, 
vegetables, dairy products and 
protein sources. Consuming 
small snacks between meals is 
important to meet a child's nutri- 
tional needs. Lack of hunger may 
mean that the prior meal con- 
tained more fat than the body 
needed. 

Children should wait an hour 



recipe from the "American I [cart 
Association Cookbook." "Nutty 
Pineapple Nibbles," which com- 
bines foods from several food 
groups, provides a variety of 
nutrients and is a quick and deli- 
cious snack that parents and chil- 
dren can make together. 

Ingredients: 

6 10-Inch celery stalks 
1/4 c. crushed pineapple 
1/2 c. "light" cream cheese 
2 T. creamy peanut butter 
IT. honey 
1/4 c raisins or dried fruit 



off celery stalks. Drain pineapple 
well in strainer. In medium bowl, 
combine drained pineapple, 
cream cheese, peanut butter and 
honey. Stir with rubber spatula 
until well mixed. Stir in raisins or 
fruit bits and hot sauce, if desired. 
With table knife, Till groove of 
each celery. Sprinkle crushed 
nuts over celery stalks. Place 
Tilled celery stalks. on large plate 
or serving tray. Refrigerate for 30 
minutes, uncovered. Remove 
from refrigerator. Place filled cel- 
ery stalks on cutting board. With 
small, sharp knife, cut each stalk 
Into five equal-size pieces and 
serve. 

Nutrient analysis: Calorics, 92; 
fat, 6 grams; saturated fat, 2 
grams; cholesterol, 9 milligrams; 
and sodium, 109 milligrams. 



AMRIG\Pank 
Mb He mlk hi healthier bebie 




Ambassador Fowler 

Scott Fowler, Ambassador for the March of Dimes, was on 
hand to thank those who walked In the WalkAmerlca fund- 
raiser in Ubertyvilte. The event raised funds to support the 
March of Dimes which fights birth defects through pre-natal 
education.— Photo by Kevin Hanrahan 



Forest Hospital's "Stressed Out?" to air on CNBC-TV 



Free health screening to 
mark Hospital Week 



Emotional, mental and physi- 
cal techniques to control stress arc 
the focus of "Stressed Out?" a half- 
hour television program produced 
by Forest Hospital that will be 
shown on CNBC, a national cable 
station. The segment will be aired 
twice — at 12:30 p.m. on Sunday, 
May 8 and at the same time on 
Sunday, . May 22 — as part of 
American Medical Television's 
HcalthStylcs programming. 

"Stressed Out?" offers advice 
from health care professionals, a 
recreational therapist and a 
dietitian to help individuals cope 
with the stress of everyday life. 

Home video copies of 
"Stressed Out?" also arc available; 
the cost is $21.95, including ship- 
ping and handling. To order, call 



635-4100, cxt. 365. 

Forest Hospital is part of Forest 
Health Systems, which offers treat- 

Reform — 

From page B24 

existing conditions and forbidding 
insurance companies from denying 
coverage or charging more because 
of health status would solve the 
majority of problems people have 
with the current system, according 
to Dcsch. Other proposals, such as 
standard benefit packages and 
paperwork reduction also fall 
under the title of insurance reform 
and appear to have wide accep- 
tance on Capitol II ilL 

Insurance reform, in varying 



ment programs for children, ado- 
lescents and adults suffering from 
mental or emotional disorders. 



degrees, is contained in most of the 
half dozen reform proposals pend- 
ing in Congress. Some lawmakers 
like House Ways and Means 
Committee Chairman Dan 
Rostcnkowski predict that insur- 
ance reform will be part of whatev- 
er final plan emerges from 
Congress. This is one aspect of the 
health care reform debate where 
there is much agreement Editor's 
note: Article submitted by LED. and 
Associates, representing Blue Cross 
and Blue Shield 



A variety of free health screen- 
ings will bs offered during 
National Hospital Week, May ft 
through 14, at St. Thercse 
Medical Center in Waukegan, 
and at the St. Thercse Area 
Treatment Satellite (STATS) in 
Lake Villa 

"This year's Hospital Week 
theme, 'Building a Healthy 
Tomorrow Today,' reflects our 
commitment to create a more 
healthy community," said Tim 
Sclz, president of St. Thercse. 
"Everyone can play a part in 
building a healthier future by tak- 
ing advantage of the upcoming 
health screenings." 

In Waukegan, cholesterol 
screenings will be offered on 
Tuesday, May 10 from 5 to 7 p.m., 
and Thursday, May 12, from 9 to 
11 a.m. Wednesday, May 11, will 



feature skin cancer screenings 
from 9 a.m. to noon, and blood 
pressure screenings from 11 a.m. 
to 2 p.m. Advance registration is 
required for the skin cancer 
screenings. 

In Lake Villa, refreshments will 
be on hand as STATS holds an 
open house on Monday, May 9, 
from 4 to ft p.m. During the open 
house, cholesterol screenings will 
be offered, and at 7 p.m., a staff 
physician will give a presentation 
^on emergency care issues. Blood 
pressure screenings will be 
offered later in the week on 
Friday, May 13, from 1 1 a.m. to 2 
p.m. 

For more information on 
National Hospital Week activities 
or to register for the skin cancer 
screenings, call ASK- A- NURSE at 
244-5900. 



Introducing the nation's most innovative day care center 
for both children and the elderly ... 



■ Day care services for children 6 weeks to 6 years, and adults 
over age 55 

♦ Daily activities include exercise, crafts, games, walks, 
special field trips and interaction with children 

♦ Adjoining areas for shared and separate activities 

♦ Adult daily activities stimulate mental and physical growth 

▼ Registered nurse on our full-time staff 

■ Emergency medical attention immediately available 

♦ Ongoing opportunities for young and old to interact 

▼ Adults enjoy the homey living room, solarium, gym, and more 

♦ Staff trained to meet the special physical and emotional needs 
of elders 55+ 

■ Adult personal care and hairdressing services available. 



fjgy QmMlDay Center 




FOR INTER0EMEHATIOM«L CARE 

700 GajiBdd Ave., Iibertyville, IL 60048 



Call to register now 

(708) 8164585 



.— '* 









Wl LIP&RVICE UeIancI Newspapers M*y 6, 1994 




i 



LI 




It's tMe taIIc oF tIhe town 

Get h off your chEST (708) 225-8075 




Upservice Is a phone-In column presented as a fea- 
ture of Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers 
makes no claim to the authenticity of the statements. 
Lakeland Newspapers does not claim the content or 
the subject matter as fact but as the personal opin- 
ion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the 
right to edit, copy or to refrain from printing a mes- 
sage. Callln at 223-8073 and leave your message 24- 
hours a day. Although the call Is anonymous, please 
leave your village name. 

No place to walk 

Can anybody explain to mo why there are no sidewalks on 
Route 83 In Grayslake north of the middle school? 

Clean up your act 

Am I missing something here? I was under the Impression 
that builders had to pick up after themselves. I guess 1hat 
Lexington Builders of Route 83 In Monavllle doesn't feel It 
goes by the same rules as the rest of us, There Is nothing like 
coming Into an area and leaving all of your construction 
garbage for everyone to driving along Route 83. 

Recycling does pay 

In answer to your recycling. I have positive proof that the 
people working 8:00. a.m. to noon on Saturday at the recy- 
cling on high school property are paid $12.50 per hour per 
person. You're trying to tell that that Is too much money, or 
not enough— that most people In Antloch make more than 
that. Please businesses who pay people more than $12.50 
come forward. I'll bet you the average pay Is about $6.00 
or $7.00 per hour. I'm sure that many people would like that 
Job at $12.50 per hour. That's a $100.00 every Saturday for 2 
people to stand there and say, "Dump the cans In the truck. 
Sure it's sometimes In bad weather, but they can sit in their 
cars too. That Is a tot of money. 

Mail problems 

I'm calling about the front page article about "Postal 
employee faces state charges'. In the April 22 edition of the 
Grayslake Times. In that article it states that Mr. Johnson, the 
postmaster, stated that there have been no complaints 
about lost or late mall. We are customers on that former' 
employee's route and we have complained continuously 
since before Christmas of last year. We have been deliv- 
ered other people's mall. We have not received our mall. 
We have called two to three times per week to the post 
office. We have filed official complaint forms. We have 
talked personally to this individual who was our malt carrier! 



NOWISTHEntiETO, 
FEAWEMEDFI 

" ' ■ "■• !. ' ■ jJ| -• ■"'" 



This statement that she had no complaints Is false. . 

Need trash control 

My, what a lovely sight along Route 83 Just south of 
Monavllle. It makes you want to go out and buy a new 
house from a builder who doesn't even pick up their own 
trash, it's been over a week since the high winds have 
come and gone and they haven't even attempted to pick 
up their garbage which has blown across the highway onto 
private property. 

Roundball kudos 

l called about four weeks ago. Please get this In this week. 
1 want to thank John Wilson and Shelly of the Grayslake Park 
District on a well-run basketball tournament erf the Grayslake I 
Middle School. Many of the visiting teams commented on 
what a great tournament it was and that they were looking 
forward to coming back next year. You and your volunteers 
did a wonderful Job. Congratulations to the Grayslake 6th 
grade Cedar Team for their first place finish in the tourna- 
ment. You boys were definitely the best and classiest team 
on the court. 

Pay your own way 

I called three weeks ago and still haven't seen my call In 
Llpservlce. Didn't you like what t said? Those who voted no ; 
for the school referendums should take the extra tax dollars 
they would have paid and donate it to the schools, Are you 
printing It this time? And why don't parents pay for their own 
kids sports equipment. No one pays for my fun time. 

Don't want to be used 

Round Lake Beach residents, ask how much your village 
attorney's salary Is and you'll know why the mayor and the 
board want to tack on a user fee. 

Good job, Gordy 

I know Ken Gordy well and you are wrong. He Is a prince, 
always has been, always will be. And the shack he calls an 
office shows exactly what Fox Lake Is becoming— a dump. 
We love you Gordy, and we will gladly stick behind you. 

Control your kids 

i see in the Antloch area that the bicycles are at It again. 
They are just like bandits on those bicycles. They are all over 
people's lawns. What kind of parents do these kids have? 
Do you teach your children any discipline and respect? It 
seems to me that you that need to be taught something. 
We see all of the destruction done at the nice, new parks. 
Then you say there Is nothing for the children to do. You 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



should create something of your own for your family enjoy, 
ment. It Is your problem to solve. 

Fox Lake needs justice 

To Mayor Hamsher of Fox Lake. Do you work for the village 
or does the village work for you? The people of Hickory had 
to bring In the federal people of HUD to get Justice for their 
water problems. Now the people on Tweed Road have had 
a problem with their sewer for years. Do they have to call In 
the federal government? Where Is the Justice In Fox Lake, 
Mayor Hamsher? 

Pet ID's 

I'm calling from Antloch. This message Is concerning all ani- 
mal owners. When you really love pets, please'make sure 
they have tags with their name and address on It. If they are 
lost, you can be contacted or the person that finds the pet 
can return it. I recently found two dogs and had to call the 
police to pick them up. This seems to upset the police by 
taking up their time. If the owner of the pet had not con- 
tacted the police In time, the pets would have been put In 
the pound and maybe destroyed. So. please take time, to 
properly l,D. your pets. 

District 1 1 6 under control 

This Is to all the people In Antloch who either support or 
believe In the newsletter that came out of that high school 
last week. I moved to Round Lake 5 years ago to the out- 
standing school district 116, It's been a tough road of 
change, but this community made the tough, unpopular 
decisions It had to make In order to put alt of our ducks In a 
row. Instead of sitting around with your noses In the air or 
somewhere else, you should have seen what the big picture 
was bringing you with this Lake County building boom. Stop 
shifting the attention of your problems to other towns, the 
obvious truth will come out. Thank you Round Lake students, 
teachers, and parents. It was worth it. 

Billboards are eyesores 

I would like to know what the Grayslake founding fathers 
would be thinking about the erecting of all these huge bill- 
boards along Route 137 and Route 83. It Is quite an eyesore, 
and If you don't think so, drive down Route 1 2 and look at all 
of those signs. Enter the suburbs of Palatine and Arlington 
Heights. That Is what It is going to look like In Grayslake. 
Wake up, village. 
See UPSERVICE page B27 



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P Newspapers 




From page B26 

Why pay twice 

I'm calling from Lake Villa regard- 
ing the unified school district, I 
have some concerns. First, what Is 
happening to the students who are 
currently enrolled In Ihe high 
schools and why should I be penal- 
ized now If I have high school stu- 
dents now? This Is an extra cost In 
sitting up the new school district 
and I understand that I still have to 
pay the cost for my own students 
as well until the unified school dis- 
trict can afford to build Its own high 
school. Something Is wrong with 
this picture, and I'm not voting for a 
unified schoot district until some-, 
thing Is done to take care of the 
kids who are enrolled In the .high 
school now. 

Invisible board member 

I'm from the Antloch area, and. I 
think it's deplorable that the 
Antloch school board has Just 
relieved several individuals who are 
school bus drivers. I'm also con- 
cerned about Wayne Sobczak. 
who has Just been voted onto the 
board. He's not even there to 
vote. What Is wrong Mr. Sobczak, 
you wanted to run. and now you 
don't want to show up. Are you 
afraid to give an opinion? 

Hatfields and McCoys 

I'm getting very sick and tired of 
reading about the feud that Is 
going on between the Lake Villa 
township supervisor Sue Hansen, 
the- highway commissioner, Jim 
Semmerllng.and each of their own 
factions. It may be a novel Idea 
but wouldn't it be nice If 1he elect- 
ed offlcidfs would' have the citizen's 
best Interests at heart Instead of try- 
ing to decide If Mr. Semmerllng 
liked the new clerk that was hired 
or If the pay was higher or lower 
than his cleric. Also. Mr. Semmerling 
didn't want to present his budget. 
Who are these people answerable 
to? Do they not have to follow a 
job description and provide ser- 
vices anyway. It's getting most 

disgusting. 

Elvis has left the building 

This is to the .Gurnee mom from the 
Antloch mom and her friend. We 
did so see Elvis. First he was at 
Gurnee Mills Mall, then he took a 
ride on the roller coaster at Great 
America, and then he was hitch- 
hiking to the Llndenhurst police. 

Took me to the cleaners 

I want to share a bad experience I 
had with a certain dry cleaner In 
Round Lake Beach. In February, 
they damaged a blouse I took In to 
be cleaned. After two months of 
leaving messages and even writing 
a letter* no one has had the 
decency to call me back, their 
utter lack of concern for their cus- 
tomers makes It a sure bet that I 
won't be going back, and no one 
else should either. If they ruin your 
clothes, it is your tough luck. 

Zone out the trash 

I'm from Antloch and I live very 
close to the Jewel-Osco on Lake 
Street. I have a complaint about 
the back side of their building that 
faces Lake Street. They have more 
trash Wowing around that building 
than I can Imagine and nobody 
will pick It up. It makes Antloch look 
like a very big trash dump. I don't 
know If there Is anything we can do 
via. zoning of via the village* but 
something needs to be done 
about It; I pay taxes here and I'm 
tired of my village, looking like a rat 
hole because of Jewel. - 

Building is all wet 

I am from Island lake, and I think we 
should be asking our- mayor,: 



Charlie Amrlch, and his zoning 
board why they are allowing and 
encouraging building In the wet- 
lands. There Is much more building 
in the wetlands in Island Lake than 
many people realize. 

Apologies deserved 

I live In the Round Lake School 
District 1 16. and how dare Mrs. 
McGuire, a school board member, 
be rude and slander the employ- 
ees of the school district— particu- 
larly my son's bus driver at his bus 
stop— when If she hadn't Interfered 
In the first "place, there would not 
have been a problem. I cannot 
believe someone In a publicly 
elected office can be so wicked 
and cruel as to try and Indoctrinate 
my children wilh disrespect toward 
their bus driver, who does a very 
difficult Job very well. I have the 
greatest respect for Round Lake 
bus drivers and I. have practically 
no respect for tvlrs McGuire what- 
soever. The children she spoke to 
deserve an apology as does the 
bus driver she was speaking very 111 
of." I'm almost at a loss for words. 
She Is a disgrace to this district. 
Then, she told my son not to tell the 
other children what she told them. 
Thank goodness our children have 
Integrity and will not ■ be bullied 
even by members of the school, 
board. 

Bad management 

This call regards the fact that they 
are cutting Round Lake School's 
bus driver Jobs. They have cut 
enough programs In Round Lake 
the way It Is. The taxes keep going 
up and it Is mostly because of the 
schools. People are always talking 

' baa" about Round Lake and no 
wonder. We are rated at the bot- 
tom of the list of schools. The last 
thing we need Is to have our buses 
taken away. As It Is. I know of a 
third grade student at Indian Hill 
who had no books last year. Now 
we are supposed to pay 40 cents 
per child per day to get them to 
school. What about the kids who 
can't afford If. and what If they for- 
get their money. Should they miss 
school If they can't take the bus. or 
maybe they should walk In the rain, 
snow, or get followed by a child 
abuser, ts that fair. Is the 40 cents 
for one way or round trip? Why 
didn't anyone get to vote on this. If 
the school has such bad manage- 
ment, why should everyone have 
to suffer. Maybe we should Just 
close our schools and all go to 
Antloch and Grayslake. Why 
aren't they having problems there, 
if Antloch Is rated so much higher 
than Round Lake, then the Round 
Lake superintendent should take 

' some pointers and do what they 
are doing In Antloch. I bet they are 
not losing their buses. How can a 
school district be so different? They 
are only a few miles apart and they 
are still the state of Illinois. Has any- 
one explained why it went this far? 

Dr. Schley on his way 

HI I'm from Antloch. This Is for the 
person who wants to be spared 1he 
pitiful stories about the Antloch 
High School job losses. The pitiful 
part of the story Is that these "cuts" 
aren't really going to save money. 
It is just a ploy to fool the taxpayers 
Into believing that the school Is 
doing their best to save. Dr. Schley 
Is searching for other employment. 
Even he Is not going to stick around 
for the outcome of this one. And 
what about Joann Osmond. She 
serves the Antloch School Board 
and the committee for the Lake 
Villa Unit District. Do I hear conflict 
of Interest here. Come on, Joann, 
If you've given up on us. get out. 

Outrageous fee 

This Is to the Round Lake Area Park 
District board of commissioners 



and administrators. I hope you get 
your Jollies charging non-residents 
one and a half times your fee. 
Most of your residents admit that 
they can't even afford your fee at 
your resident's rate. So, I hope you 
have a lot of money and a lot of 
people, because I for one will not 
come back to your park district. 

Wake up, Antioch 

I'm calling about the Upservlce 
article called "ACHS" cuts, and Cm 
totally In agreement that there Is a 
lot of dead weight over at Antloch. 
High School. I feel they should cut 
unproductive people. like the hall 
monitors. I have a child at that 
school and I understand that the 
teachers act as hall monitors In 
addition to 1he people who are 
paid as hall monitors. If there are 
enough concerned parents out 
there, why can't a voluntary 
schedule be made up with all 
these concerned people who truly 
want to help the schoot. What 
about court assigned community 
service coming to the school: Free 
up the teachers to tepch. Get rid 
of the dead weight. Come on. 
Antloch. Wake up.' 

Picked on the small guy 

The Antloch school board has 
shown once again how ruthless 
they are. Instead of being respon- 
sible and demanding teacher con- 
cessions and higher new home 
development Impact fees, they 
turn to a couple pf small groups like 
the custodians and bus drivers and 
try to pressure them into helping 
pass their referendum. Custodians. 



bus drivers, and sports activities 
have not. put this community Into 
debt. ■ Teachers and developers 
have and they are the ones who 
control the school board, 

Good work, Bob 

I'm calling from Wildwood and I ■ 
keep reading negative comments 
about Bob Depke. I'm a volunteer 
coach In Warren Township youth 
football and Mr. Depke has always 
been very helpful to our program. 
Our township center Is a well run 
and beautiful facility. Keep up the 
good work Bob. 

Trustee licensing 

I am from Round Lake Heights and 
I have two questions to ask our 
mayor. One, are the village 
trustees licensed plumbers so they 
can go around and check the 
sewer covers? Two. are they 
licensed to ride around in the. 
patrol cars with the officers. When 
they are calfea do they have to 
drive, the trustees back home 
before they can respond. I'm Just 
wondering what kind of police pro- 
tection we can expect here. 

Message to dog owners 

Do you ever print anything about 
Lake Zurich? I would like to com- 
plain about the Increase of dog 
owners and the Irresponsibility they 
have for walking their dogs and 
letting them go on every parkway 
tree. Those trees are for the beau- 
tlflcatlon of the neighborhood, and 
they'll die with the dogs going on 
them. I think they should let the 
dogs go on their own lawns and 



their own trees If they want- to kill 
them. 

Enough of Crane 

I keep reading your newspaper 
and all I see are Phil Crane articles 
"repeatedly. As a Democrat, I 
would like to see some fair cover- 
age given to some of the other 
candidates running for office. 
Editorial Notm: Lakmland 

Newtpapen mm l*gitlatiw pnn 
folate* from our toco/, statm and, 
U.S. wpresentatfvBi, most of whom 
arm Ropubiicant. 

Gang up on gangs 

I live In Round Lake Heights and I 
can't believe that the police stop 
people from going In and out of 
the village with their village stickers 
when they are not even due til 
June, it seems 'to me that they 
shold be working on the gangs that 
are jn the Heights rather than stop- 
ping people for village stickers. 
What a big waste of money. 

No Earth Day 

Once -again those liberal, socialist, 
athlests are at It by brainwashing 
our children at the public schools. 
This time It's Earth Day. Earth Day Is 
nothing but a Satanic ritual teach- 
ing our children that God will not 
take care of them. 

Speeding police 

Regarding the meter reader police 
woman In Antloch, we clocked her 
doing 65 miles per hour in a 50 zone 
down Route 173, then she turned 
on to Deep Lake road doing 55 
miles per hour In a 40 zone. What 
an example that is. 





AMI 
SAL! 



I 



TO BENEFIT 






(No-Kill Animal Shelter in Crystal Lake) 

SUNDAY, MAY 22 

AT 







WE ARE LOOKING FOR GOOD, 

WORKABLE ITEMS FOR THIS FUNDRAISER. 

YOUR DONATIONS ARE ALL TAX-DEDUCTIBLE. 

WE ARE ESPECIALLY INTERESTED IN COSTUME JEWELRY 

CALL LISA AT (708) 587-8670 OR 

YVONNE AT (708) 61 5-8348-. 

IF YOU HAVE ANY ITEMS TO DONATE. 

NO LARGE APPLIANCES OR CLOTHING, PLEASE. 



* 




li 




1 GREEN UP lAkElAKd Newspapers M*y 6, 1994 



cnccrvi 




Lakeland; 



NewBpapcro 



Botanic garden offers May gardeni 



The Plant Information Service at the 
Chicago • Botanic Garden offers these 
suggestions for gardeners: 
■ For outdoor gardening: 

• Plant sweet corn In mid-May. 
Planting several varieties with different 
maturity dates Is suggested. 

•Plant snap beans, summer squash 
and New Zealand spinach In mid-May. 

•Thin carrots, beets, kohlrabi and 
late lettuce. 

•Plant. tomatoes, pepper, eggplant/ 
sweet potatoes and other warm-sea : 
son crops near the end of the month. 

•Continue to harvest mature planti- 
ngs of asparagus and rhubarb so they 
will keep growing. 

• Plant annuals, perennial flowers 
and herbs near the end of the month. 

•When peonies reach 10 Inches In 
height they should be staked or sur- 
rounded by a ready-made peony 
hoop so the" flowers will not lay on the 
ground. 

•Allow bulb foliage to die naturally 
In order to produce food for storage 



and next year's growth. 

•Finish uncovering and fertilize 
hybrid tea roses and tender perennials. 

•Monitor hybrid tea roses for fungal, 
diseases and use appropriate control 
measures. 

•Prune most spring flowering shrubs 
like forsythla viburnum and lilac Imme- 
diately after they bloom. 

•Begin spray schedule to control dis- 
eases and Insects on fruit trees. Do not 
spray fruit trees with Insecticides white In 
bloom. 

•Begin planting trees, shrubs and 
fruit trees. 

. •Control Insects as they appear In 
the garden and on trees and shrubs. 

•Mow lawn to a height of two Inch- 
es and remove not more than one-third 
of the leaf blade with each mowing \ 

•Fertilize lawn and apply broadleaf 
herbicide If necessary. 

•Plant waterHlles and lotus as soon 
as the water temperature rises above 
55 degrees. 

Answers to specific questions are 



available by calling Ihe Plant Informa- 
tion Service at 835-0972 between 10 
a.m. and 3 p.m. dally. Visitors can also 
stop by the Plant Information office 
located in the Fruit and Vegetable 
Garden at the Chicago Botanic 
Garden. It Is open dally from 10 am. to 
3 p.m. 

The Chicago Botanic Garden Is 
located at 1000 Lake Cook Rd. In Glen- 




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NcTOpapers 



i ■ j. 



Create a weed-free 




In your own backyar 




Weeds. They're unsightly. They grow 
faster than grass and stick out In a yard. 
They rob grass and other plants of 
much needed water and nutrients. 
Above all. they're very difficult—If not 
Impossible— to control once they start 
growing. 

But weeds don't need to be a nui- 
sance. Today's backyard gardener has 
many options to make a yard unfriend- 
ly to weeds. Special weed-fighting 
products— not. to mention shrubs, frees,., 
grasses andvegetable gardens=-can "■ 
all help make a lawn weed-resistant. 
With a little planning and elbow grease, 
you, too, can transform your yard Into 
an attractive, weed-free landscape. 
Vegetable gardens 

Weeds In the vegetable garden are 
far more than an eyesore; they attract 
Insects and compete for the vital water 
and nutrients that vegetable-produc- 
ing plants need to flourish, dne.slmpje 
and easy way to keep weeds out of 
your garden Is to use a biodegradable 
weed barrier, such as BloBlock by Easy. 
Gardener, which Is made from 100 per- 
cent recycled fibers, 

Before planting vegetables, prepare 
the garden bed by tilling or turning the 
topsoll. They, lay overlapping strips of 
the material over the prepared planti- 
ng site and over the edges with soil. 
Using scissors or a knife, cut holes or X's 
In the appropriate spots and place 
plants through, the opening, directly 
.Into the soil. At season's end, shovel or 
J\\\ any remaining BloBlock into the soil. 



where It will rapidly blodegrade. 
Shrubs, trees 

Shrubs and trees add personality to 
any backyard. And, though most plants 
won't grow In the shade under a shrub 
or tree, some weeds seem not to mind. 

To keep weeds from growing under 
shrubs and trees already In the lawn, 
dig a circular well around the trunk. The 
well should extend one to two to three 
Inches deep. 

Then, cut a strip of landscape fabric 
on the solfln a ring around the trunk, 
securing It with bricks. The Inside edge 
of the fabric should. come up to the 
trunk. Once the fabric b In place, cover 
It with gravel or wood chips and you 
won't see another weed there for 
years. 

If you're adding a new shrub or tree 
to the yard, first dig a hole twice as 
wide and a foot deeper than the root 
ball. Place the roots of the shrub or tree 
Into the hole and cover the roots with 
loose soli. Water the loose sol! until It Is 
completely saturated. Then, as with 
shrubs or frees already In the yard, 
cover the bare soil around the trunk 
with a strip of landscape fabric and 
secure It with bricks. Once In place, 
cover the fabric with gravel or wood 
chips. 
Weeds In lawn 

Weeds can destroy the harmony of 
any home lawn. Broadleaf weeds, such 
as dandelions, pigweed and ragweed, 
are common lawn Invaders and diffi- 
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Ice Cold Watermelon 1/2 and 1/4 

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healthier a lawn Is, the less likely it Is to 
have weeds. 

If your lawn Is looking ragged, shape 
It up by overseedlng and spot -patch- 
ing. For thin areas of lawn, overseed by 
applying two to three pounds of seed 
for every 1,000 square feet. , : 

For bare areas, you can. spot patch 
by first applying a smalt amount of fertil- 
izer, then grass seed. After seeding, 



water the lawn and keep the soil moist 
until the new grass has germinated, 

If your lawn has weeds, it's best to 

pull them by hand. The easiest time; to 

pull weeds Is when the earth Is loose or 

•soft, such as a day or two after a light 

rain. 

To keep weeds from returning, water 
and mow the lawn regularly and it will 
squeeze weeds out naturally. 





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...and small parking lots 

• Seal Coating • Patchwork 
• Crack Filling 

Protect and Preserve 
Reasonable rates. Call for a FREE estimate 

AMERICAN SEALCOATDfG 

By George 



(708) 740-4051 or 
(708) 356-1911 



EBBSSHSSBcSttV 



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SJ! GREEN UP UI<eUncI Newspapers M*y 6, 1994 



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Lakeland- 

' Newspapers 



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Flowering crab trees offer wide variety of beauty 



Since there are over 600 varieties of 
(lowering crabs to choose from, I'd like 
to talk only about a few of them, their 
shapes, flowering and berries. 

The Malus "Spring Snow" Is a relative 
newcomer to the block. Its form Is 
rounded and does achieve a height of 
20 feet and width of 20 feet. Its pink 
buds open to a pure white flower while 
the foliage produces a nice green 
color. This crab Is sterile and therefore 
produces no berries. 



On the other side of Ihe coin Is the 
Malus "Sugartyme." This crab's berries 
are very red, small (1 /8 inch across) and 
persistent. Its shape Is somewhat Irregu- 
lar and open. Its pink buds also open to 
show a white flower. 

A nice pink flowering* crab that 
shows a fairly persistent berry Is the 
Malus "Adams." A brightly colored pink 
flower on this plant also shows a tinge of 
purple In the foliage. Its red berry Is per- 
sistent and does add winter Interest to 




Garden Corner 

NURSERY and GARDEN CENTER 

Wholesale/Retail 

Landscape Supplies & Gift Shop 

ROUTES 12 & OLD 120, VOLO, IL 

815-344-1117 




A QudKy Ful S«vlc« Garden Centtr 
loheteop»Dtripn-Conrtuctton-MoW«nonc« 

mm 

Mum or Geranium For Mom 

Saturday & Sunday 

5/7^5/8 

Limit one per morn 






4b 

4b 



SHAMROCK GARDEN CENTER 



21714 Rt. 176 • Wauconda 

1/4 mile West of Rt. 12 on Rt. 176 

526-0040 

ALL 2 1/2" SHADE TREES 



Including Red Maples, Bradford Pears, 
Autumn Purple Ash and many others 

$ 200^ Planted 

100% GUARANTEED 



River Birch | MULCH delivered I we now have 

_ I MUSHROOM 

per yard! compost 



* FULLY STOCKED GARDEN CENTER * 

LANDSCAPE CONSULTATION AND DESIGN SERVICE AVAILABLE 

HOURS: THURS 8AM- 7:30PM; FRI 8AM-4:30PM; SAT8AM-4PM; SUN 9AM-2:30PM 





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CEDAR HILL 
NURSERY 

(Sorttpiete ^auien (Sentev 

•TREES •EVERGREENS 

•FLOWERS •SHRUBS 'PERENNIALS 

•GARDEN TOOLS & SUPPLIES 

LANDSCAPE DESIGN SERVICE 

708-540-8474 



O'/fiftttft/i, L /\ "iffifitft/* ci' <t/sy? Ceift/tfffft i 



Corner of Rt. 22 & Quentin Road — Lake Zurich, IL 



the plant. Its mature. height Is 20 to 25 
feet while Its width can also attain 
these dimensions. 

The knock against the red flowering 
crabs has been the problem with scab, 
leaving the plant leafless by August, 
However, another relative newcomer 
to the crabs Is the Malus "Pralrleflre," 
and seems to show a great resistance 
to scab. This Is a slower grower com- 
pared to the previous crabs men- 
tioned, however, worth the wait. Its dark 



reddish-brown branches produce a 
reddish-purple tinged leaf, The dark red 
buds open to form a carmine-red 
flower that Is very beautiful In the spring. 
A real winner as far as a red flowering 
plant In one's garden, ' 

The next two to three weeks should 
be prime viewing time to see the many 
flowering ornamentals. A great place 
to go would be the Chicago' Botanic 
Gardens— by MIKE GRECO, owner of 
Mill Creek Nursery, Wadftworth 



Mill Creek 
Nursery 



40960 MILL CREEK RD.. WADSWORTH, IL 



1994 GRAND OPENING NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 



OPEN FRIDAY, SATURDAY &&LJNDAY 

HOU RS: 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. ^^^IotheSsows^ci 
Landscape Architects and Horticulturists On Staff Jl*r flats of annuals «9.w 
Design & Installation Services Available 

HARDY. LOCALLY GROWN 

^t SHADE TREES v * PERENNIALS, GROUND COVERS 

^ORNAMENTALS ^* FLATS OF FLOWERS, Coming 

^ EVERGREENS ^POTTED GERANIUMS Soon! 

Phone 708-855-0591 

Directions to Mitt Creek Nursery: 41 North to Rio. 1 73 (Rosecrans) 
West to (1 st Intersection) Mill Creek Rd. , Left on gravel road 1/2 mile to Nursery Sign. 



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Fairfield Material & Supply, Inc. 

'Decorative Landscape Material" 

Visit Our Newly Remodeled Garden Shop 



MARK YOUR CALENDAR 

12 NOON-MAY 21 ST 

PAVING BRICK SEMINAR. 

JUST IN TIME FOR MEMORIAL DAY! 






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•Hardwood Mulch 

•Western Bark 

•Cypress Mulch 

•Grass Seed 

•Trees 

•Shrubs 



GRANITE BOULDERS, HOLEY 

BOULDERS, FLAGSTONE STEPPERS, 

CUT DRYWALL, LAVA BOULDERS 



Pea Gravel 

Limestone 

Sand Grade 9 



•Retaining 
Wall Systems 

•Lawn Edging 20 Ft Strip 
•Drain Tile & Accessaries 
•Steel Culverts . 



•Exposed Merrlmac 
•Red Flint Patio Blocks 

24* round or square 
18* round or square 
1 2* round or square & more 



•Lava Rock 

•White Marble 

•Western Sunset 

•Merrimac 
& Lots, Lots More 



•Paving Brick 

•Hollandstone Paving Brick 
•Hexstone Interlocking Pavers 
•Victorian Circle 



Beautiful Flowering Crabapple Trees, etc. 



BIRD BATHS, FOUNTAINS, ~ 
CONCRETE BENCHES, 
STRAWBERRY POTS U MORE- 



Beavtifnl 

Anneals Jest 

la lime For 

Mother's Day 

•Geraniums 

•Alysurh 

•Aston 

•Dusty Miller 

•Petunias 

•Impatlens 

•Snap Dragons 

•Zinnias 

•Broccoli 

•Cabbage 

•Cantaloupe 

•Tomatoes 

•22 hems & many more 

fruits & vegetables 

•Plus Much More 



10 North Fairfield Rd., Round Lake (Located Between Rt 134 & Rt. 120) 

« 708-740-3203 OS 

Monday 'Friday 7 - 6; Saturday 7 - 4; Sundays -2 



*m. 



****** *flr*L- I 



EFWn < .; . \ 





Classic 











COROLLAS •TERCELS 
• SUPRAS -PREVIAS 
•CAMRYS -MR2S 
•TRUCKS 



CHEVROLET 



• CAVALIERS *LUMINAS 
•CAPRICES •CORSICAS 

• BERETTAS •CORVETTES 




•TRACKERS 
PRIZMS ^METROS 




■■«» 






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Inversions 



14 -FULL SIZE VANS 
iHfc -SUBURBANS °IVSIN8VANS 
■H| -BLAZERS .TRUCKS 

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CHIVY TRUCJCS 



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1M§|I o4X4S *S10 BLAZERS 
IMf .PICK UPS .SUBURBANS 
*NHr 'S 10 PICKUPS .CARGO VANS 

• CREW CABS .EXTENDED CABS 
■ f -SPORTSIDE PICK UPS 



f FACTORY INVOICES 

AVAILABLE 

FOR YOUR INSPECTION- 
FT'S SIMPLE, IT'S EASY! 



■aw«MHipn(«HWc>w« t1 



Ueai-r p'o ! 



ruled tc am 



ount oi dollars charged above invoice No prior sales Excludes Camaros and Land Cruisers ^^^^^^^^^^^^W^ 





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TOYOTA 






GURNEE 



BELViOSRi rqI WAUHEGAN 




425 M. GREEN BAY 



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WAUklS^Si • "h6^<3&s&" 1-7Q8-336-4300 



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708-223*8652 



CHEVROLET 



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^ Choose From: 

I • BERETTAS 

• CAVALIERS 
*5 • CAMAROS 
~T* • CAPRICES 

| • CORSICAS 
• CORVETTES 
• LUMINAS 'METROS • PRIZMS 






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Choose From: bMj*a ' . _ 

• ASTROS f 
• LUMINAAPVS 

• CONVERSION VANS I 

• PICKUPS • BLAZERS \ 

• SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES \ 

• Cl/STOAf PICKUPS 
SUBURBANS • TRACKERS 






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V.OAEAT AMEBIC* 1 Tf /|S 




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<—/£><-, 708-223-8651 
LaC_LJ 708-223-8652 



CHEVROLET 



Seven Minutes West 

Of 1-94 on Route 1 20 

in Grayslake 

FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1926 



.--■■■, •»-_!* 










'>*UI0CH 



1994 LAkdArid Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Cold we II office wins top award 

VERNON BILLS— The Vernon Hills Office, as a part 
of Cold well Danker Chicago, received the company's : 
top award, the "No. 1 Service Excellence Award", 
among 2,200 offices nationally. This award recognizes 
overall satisfaction levels, performance and results 
achieved by all the offices in the Coldwcll Banker 
Chicago operation. Of all Chicago area customcrssur- 
vcyed, including Coldwcll Banker Vernon Hills cus- 
tomers, over 96 percent rated the service received as 
superior. 

Morgan to open Wauconda office 

WAUCONDA— -Chris Morgan, Investment represen- 
tative for the St. Louis based Investment firm Edward 
D. Jones & Co., will celebrate the grand opening of his 
new office in Wauconda from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on May 
7 at 455 W. Liberty St. Activities will include ribbon- 




cutting at 10 a.m. by^ayd^ft^nbachi 'cdk AAStfpflp 
thereafter and draWmgVfoctyrbMS thrmf#ft(Ut the day. ' 
Chris will be on hand to greet' visltofsTOGyiscuss 
trends In today's securities Industry. 

Gander Mountain sales up 

WILMOT, WIS*— Citing strong winter and early 
spring sales, Gander Mountain, Inc. reported record 
sales for Its third quarter of fiscal 1994, up 30 percent 
Gander Mountain continues to benefit from significant 
growth in our catalog unit and our retail plan," said 
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Ralph L Frcltag. 
"We arc encouraged by Improved order rates and 
. internal operating efficiencies." 

U of I seeks nominations 

GRAYSLAKE— The University of Illinois is accepting 
applications for membership on the Extension 
Council, the advisory council of the Lake County 
Cooperative Extension Service. The Council provides a 




way for citizens. to participated In planning, delivering 
and evaluating Extension education programs. Council , 
members, appointed by the state director, serve a two 
year term beginning in July and must be Lake County 
residents, For additional information and application, 
call 223-8627. 

Advantage makes acquisition 

KENOSHA, WIS.— Advantage Bancorp Inc. and 
Amity Bancsharcs announce the signing of a definitive 
merger agreement for Advantage to acquire Amity In 
cash transaction. Advantage is the parent company of 
Advantage Bank FSB and Amity is the parent company 
of Amity Federay Bank for Savings. Following the 
merger, Advantage will have assets of approximately 
$800 million and a network of 13 full-service offices 
located in Wisconsin and Illinois. Lake County loca- 
tions are In Gurnec, North Chicago, Round Lake Beach 
and Zion. The total amount of cash to be paid by 
Advantage in the merger is $24.8 million. 



1 





Lakeland 

Newspapers 



THIS WEEK 





Rockenbach breaks 
ground for new 
dealership. 
RAGE G6 





Company Price Change Dlv. 

Abbott . 28 7/8 +3/4 $0.76 

Allstate 23 1/2 -3/8 $0.72 

Amcritech38 3/4 -2 3/4 $1.92 

AT&T % 527/8 V +5/8 $1.32 \ 

Baxter ~ 24 1/2 +1 1/8 $1.00 

Brunswick 24 3/8 +2 7/8 $0,441 

Com. Ed. 25 -3/8 $1.60 

D.WiUer.391/8 +17/8 $0.50/ 

Kemper 57 1/8 -3/8 $0.92 

McDonalds 59 5/8 --— $0.43 

Motorola 43 7/8 -2 1/8 $0.56 

Peoples En. 29 1/8-1 $1.80 

Qkr. Oaks 64 1/2 -3/4 - $2.12 

Sara Lee 21 +1/2 $0.64 

Sears 47 3/4 +1 $1.60 

UAL 1277/8+3/4 $0.00 

Walgrcens42 3/4 +5/8 $0.68 

WMXTech. 26 1/8 +1 1/8 $0.60 

Cherry Elec. 29 +1 $0.00 





continues in 



nursery after 65 years 



Richard Lelder, of Leider's Garden Greenery, takes cuttings from 
geraniums In order to propogate new plants. Lelder takes the 
1,000 stock geraniums that the nusery buys each year and turns 
them Into the 20,000 they grow annually— Photo by Gene Gabry 



NEAL TUCKER, 

Staff Reporter 

In 1929, a teenage Richard 
Leider< began working in his 
father's greenhouse in Evanston. 
Economic times were not very 
good with the oncoming depres- 
sion, so as a high school student, 
Richard felt fortunate to have a 
job, even If his duties were not so 
glamorous, 

"'There's the wheelbarrow, 
* the shovel and the broom. Go 
clean up'." Leider recalls with a 
smile the words his father spoke 
to him 65 years ago. "I guess I had 
to start somewhere." 

Much' has changed for the 77- 
year-old Grayslake resident since 
those first days in his father's 
greenhouse. He built a successful 



business just north of the inter- 
section of Lake Street and Route 
83 in Grayslake. His son, Steve 
now runs the operation, and 
Richard comes in for about 3 
hours every morning to get some 
exercise and to think. 

"Every once in a. while I actu- 
ally point out something to the 
boss," he refers to his son,' "and I 
show him something -that is 
wrong." 

Richard still has specific 
duties he must attend to and his 
main job is not a small one. The 
primary business of Leider's 
Garden Greenery is to propogate 
flowers, particularly annuals such 
as geraniums. The nursery buys 
about 1,000 geraniums from a 
See NURSERY page C4 



Bank employees get go-ahead to purchase majority control 



MARY FOLEY ' 

Staff Reporter 

The Employee Stock 
Ownership Plan (ESOP) of the 
First National Bank of Antioch 
received the go-ahead from the 
Federal Reserve to purchase the 
controlling interested in the 



bank's holding company, 
Antioch Bancsharcs, 

Incorporated (AB1). In December 
of 1993, the ESOP employees 
voted unanimously in favor of 
purchasing the ABI common 
stock. 

"We have waited in eager 



anticipation for this approval 
from the Federal Reserve bank of 
Chicago and look forward to 
completing the transaction," said 
Ted Axton, president and chief 
executive officer of both ABI and 
First National Bank of Antioch. 
"Our employees are excited 



about the approval and the new 
opportunities this purchase 
means for them as employees 
and stockholders of their new 
business. Their dedication has 
made this community bank suc- 
cessful in every way. We think 
See BANK page C2 



Lake County's Largest^ kSANDY 
Chrysler-Plymouth ^^ ^55 _ _ _ . ■ 
Dodge-DbdgeJTmck 



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vendy DODOMWKl. 



r Admin Unlnr 



EdAhreru 

Tim Mimpi 



FOX LAKE, IL 

Did Winter Take It's Toll On Your Vehicle? Get Your Car Or Truck 

Ready For Vacation Driving,.. 

!"aI coTJdItomng service] rc^SLiNGSYSTEM siSvicE] ril^ilisIL^" "! 

J F*do*yTi«ln«dT«chnW«n»-w«rHAc*dupto1lb.o< I •Inapt* lw~« wd tote <""£•<• <x**$ %+** I ^^^^Z^^^^SVia^* r 

■ Ffacx!, fmpwl Air CoodrtkHmg System and Prwuur. ' 4tow Mop«« fttrmi* ,kj *>^^ '*£./* ' 33,TS^S£ fcTiXJ^X^S £3£L 

Test (of Leak*. , (IfltLmw.) •"ffiMf* ~ d ," 00 " I ■ *•** n4mmtiH tot caahotbmlyihcpnipiim . 

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■ vmtwt ik i_ ,..-» 



COUNTY UkclANd Newspapers May 6, 1994 



^feANDY 
Hm c KIE 



FOX LAKE. IL 



SHOP LAKE COUNTY' S 

LARGEST CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH 

DODGE & DODGE TRUCK DEALER 



L> t)| UOJ 



FINANCING FOR 60 MONTHS 

ON ALL 1994 CHRYSLER NEW YORKERS 



1995 NEONS 

NOW IN STOCK 



Starting 
At 



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WE HAVE 

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CARS& 

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READY TO 

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MID & FULL SIZE CARS 



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• BUT DIALS 

• BIST SUUtCTION 

• BIST SIRVICI 

IT ONLY TAKES MINUTES 

TO MAKE A BETTER DEAL AT 

SANDY McKIE'S 






SPECIAL OF THE WEEK! 



'90 DODGE SPIRIT ES 

»6495 ar»184 M ,»-.42-aa,atio.2»AM 

"^Plymouth turismo *199Sj -^ JEEp mm CHER0K EE LAREDO 

One Owner, 12,000 Miles, Fully Loaded. 



■itam'U CHRYSLER LEBAR0N CONVERTIBLE 
»79 95 ■> '232" »m.4im.t ».m *m 
89 D0D6E DAYTONA ES 



.3-3821 

•4995^* 163"^-^. 



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'91 DODGE DAYTONA 

'6995 - »175 T4 m mm. At mm. -MOW 



•449*1 '88 MAZDA 929 

'8495 *c*282 1 *mc^. m w mtiocAw 



MUST SEE 



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* 6495 „*184"»t.~.4i— . t io j* am 



113839 _ '91 EAGLE TALON 

'9495 « *239 M i>tri-.4f W >. ■» 2.75 am 



^35,3 '86 DODGE LANCER 

•2995 f * 142°Vr m. 24 MM. at 12.75 AM 

^ '92 CHRYSLER LEBARON CPE 
»10,495«r $ 238 14 aar»».t4a~,>t t.22 



VANS 



m-3939 '88 SUBARU XT6 CPE 

'4995 ar *192 3T Mr -a. 30 a~. at 1130 AM 



•4-3937 

'86 HONDA CIVIC CRX 



1995 



~ '90 PLYMOUTH ACCLAIM 

«S995 „ »152 TT par -wi. 42 -aa. at 10.22 AM 



.«926T 90 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER 

*849S >*218" par -a.42a»a..t 10.71 AW 



•4-3944T 



^,35 '88 DODGE ARIES 

*3995 ~*153*V»».m>»~- •» ii.m *m 



•i2<wo4 '88 CHRYSLER 5TH AVE. 

*3995 ar »153'V—. 20 »-. at 11.20 AMI 



•248M '90 DODGE SPIRIT 

'5995 ar , 179 4 V ■*. 42 toaa. m IOM AM 



'92 DODGE CARAVAN SE 

t 11.995^ < 272 4 °par^Ma^at^»AfH 

mm — *8d FORD AEROSTAR XL 

♦7995 ~ '232" -> ■». 42 -». « n .20 *■* 
.wSr"~ '93 PLMOUTH VOYAGER 

'14,495 » '297 04 - ... «o — : * mi am 



.9-3630 '89 DODGE DAYTONA 

«4495~ > 147 i y~».~ * 11 00 am 



•11-3763 '89 PONTIAC SUNBIRD LE 

'5495 ar '179*° pat -a. 14 mm. at 11.00 AM 



iiaeM '89 CHEVY BERETTA 

'6495 ar * 188** par ma. 42 'mm, at 11.20 AWt 



mm '90 DODGE CARAVAN SE 

*9495 ar »244" par;-. *mm. .t Ml AM 



.4 39.2 '89 MERKUR XR4T1 

»4995 ar '163" par -w 20 -~. « 11.00 AM 



TRUCKS 



■4-3940 

'87 PLYMOUTH SUNDANCE 



s 1495 



"^^ *90 DODGE SPIRIT 

'5495 ar *158 a, »f>.*2 W aa.tl0a»fl 



Tun" '"88 FORD TEMPO 

»299Sar'iiS l> par«».20— -*U-20M» 



.4-3*531 '89 DODGE B250 CONVERSION VAN 
•8895 m *261 u m -**—. * ii*o am 



SPORTY 



.12-3617 '90 PONTIAC SUNBIRD CON 

♦7495 * '213* V-.42»»», at 10.32 AM 



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86 DODGE D100 PICKUP LEi****.^^. gj*gg 
I M4946T 93 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB LE «£~ 

J '14.995 » '307" — ■» 20 —-af-42 AM ■'"» 

L^t 92 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB LE 

'13.995 «r'29S** gaj^tWam.att.TlAWT 



M3036 89 FORD PROBE 

»449S - > 147" pat = 20 •— . m 11*0 AM 



.,064 5 t '92 00D6E 0150 LE PICKUP 

»l2.995ar , 295"p»r^Ma^tt.»AM 



SANDY McKIE 



Iwrtay twMipi' CLOUD 20*10*' 



,«.*.,-, 



SEMMCK MRT2 ._ 

OK M MOMDA* TMPW FAtOAY 7:>0 nMS«| 
" CAlLHT-4471 



91 South Rtt. 12 



fFOX LAKE. IL 



708-587-6473 






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May ft, 1994 UkeUd Newspapers BUSINESS 




IVtttttphy-©N-REAl-EsTAT€^- J8EZMM. %st for residential listings 






Terr! Murphy 



Pricing and Selling 




This Is the time of year that the transferee 
market gets busier as new executives accept 
positions in different areas. As an agent, it Is our 
, job to educate these new buyers with informa- 
tion about the areas they choose to consider 
buying a home. There arc several issues that 
must be addressed prior to even looking at 
homes so that the buyer is comfortable about the 
different customs and ways of doing business as It varies from area to 
area. 

The first issue to address is the difference in purchase agreements. 
Most commonly, the pre- printed form is issued thru the local associa- 
tion of Realtors sanctioned by all the legal reviews. This "fill-in-the- 
blanks" form makes presenting a formal offer cohesive and simple. 
Each area provides for practices concurrent with their area. You can 
expect to have attorney -■pproval contingencies built right in to the 
body of the agreement. Some areas have a separate rider attached to 
the agreement to provide for approvals, including inspections, well 
and septic reports or other contingencies. 

The second area of variance is the earnest money used to secure the 
agreement It is common in some areas to use a figure of approximate- 
ly $1,000 at the initial offer. After the offer has been accepted, the 
earnest money can accelerate to up to 10 percent to give the seller 
"good faith" and security while other contingencies arc being met. For 
the most part there arc no hard fast laws that the increase of earnest 
money should be at 10) and it depends often on the buyer's situation. 
A low earnest money offering on behalf of the buyer docs not neces- 
sarily indicate a weak offer. Have your attorney or agent check further 
into the reasoning. In many areas a handshake and as little as $500 is 
all that is required to "hold" a transaction. You may learn that the 
buyer has additional Moines tied up in a CD that won't mature for 2 to 
3 weeks and chooses not to lose the interest, or their equity is tied up 
in their present home which is closing soon. 

Another practice that seems to be different from area to area is the 
pricing differential between listing and selling price. The local Multiple 
Listing Service can offer general statistics for the common percentages 
between the actual offering price and the final selling price. Even with- 
in a county area a new buyer will need to be informed of what the gen- 
eral rule of thumb for an initial offer has been. Any buyer is free to 
make what ever offer, they feel comfortable with. It is only natural for 
that buyer to want to know how flexible our pricing may be. In some 
areas, like new construction or lot pricing there is very little negotiating 
the selling price. In other areas of housing there maybe larger areas for 
negotiation's due to the circumstances of the seller, the. supply and 
demand, and the nature of the property. 

If you arc a first time buyer, or new to an area, take the time to 
become familiar with the regular practices in an area. This can help 
you be in a much stronger position when making an offer to the seller 
to work in your best interest 

Questions or comments may be directed to Terri Murphy, Box 6234, 
Liberty villeJL 60048. 



Bank 



From page CI 

this will be especially true now as 
they become the major share- 
holders." 

The First National Bank of 
Antioch has been serving north 
central Illinois and southwest 
Kenosha- County since it was 
founded in 1926 by C.K. 
Anderson. It has total assets of 
$85 million and total deposits of 
$75 million. The bank employs 
60, and has two full-service loca- 
tions in Antioch and in unincor- 
porated Gurncc.. 

The ESOP will purchase 
10,850 shares of AM common 
stock from the current control- 
ling shareholder group. ABI will 
offer to repurchase, from its 




ovenant 




ortgage (708) 680-0404 

corporation 




1641 N. Milwaukee Avenue, Unit #10, LibenyviUe, Illinois, 60048 
An Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee 

Our Team of Loan Officers have over 50 Years 

of Home Mortgage Experience 

Let us arrange the best loan program for you: 

•FHA/V.A. Insured Loans 
•Community Homebuyers Program 

(Only 3% down required) 
•ARM and Balloon Programs ^^ 

•Jumbo and Conforming . LEj 



RE/MAX led area real estate 
sales organizations for the num- 
ber of residential listings sold In 
the Lake County market area for 
1993. Based on data supplied by 
ihc Lake County Association of 
Realtors of the North Shore 
Board of Realtors Multiple 
Listing Service, RE/MAX 
obtained a 22.74 percent market 
share. 

- The study, conducted by 
RE/MAX, combines the sold resi- 
dential listings of all office loca- 
tions and independent offices of 
each multi-office or franchise 
organization identified. The list- 
ings were sold cither by the 
named organization or with the 
aid of a cooperating broker. 

"Lake County is a highly com- 
petitive market, and the success 
achieved by RE/MAX reflects our 
sales associates' effectiveness in 
serving their clients, day in and 
day out," said Betty Hcgncr, pres- 
ident and co-owner of RE/MAX of 
Northern Illinois, Inc. 

The 1993 data on residential 
listings sold in the Lake County 
market area showed the follow- 
ing organizations ranked first 
through ninth: RE/MAX, 22.74 
percent; Century 21, 18.54 per- 
cent; Coldwcll Banker, 11;03 per- 
cent; Prudential, 9.88 percent; 
Baird & Warner, 6.54, percent; 
Koenig & Strey, 5.75 percent; 
ERA, 4.2 percent; Kahn Realty, 3 
percent and Realty Executives, 
. 2.62 percent. 

Data maintained by the Lake 
County Association of Realtors or 
the North Shore Board of Realtors 
or the Multiple Listing Service 
may not reflect all real estate 



activity in the market The Lake 
County area market share study 
Includes a compilation of data on 
real estate activity in the follow- 
ing communities: Antioch, 
Barrington, Buffalo Grove, 
Dccrficld, Fox Lake, Grayslakc, 
Gurnec, Highland Park, 
Inglcside, Lake Forest, Lake Villa, 
Libertyville, Lincolnshire, 

Mundclcin, North Chicago, 
Round Lake, Vernon Hills, 
Wadsworth, , Wauconda, 
Waukcgan, Winthrop Harbor arid 
Zion. 

RE/MAX of Northern Illinois 



has led the Chicago metropoIIffiTP 
residential real estate .market 
each year since 1989 in closed 
sales volume. In 1993, the closed 
sales volume recorded by 
RE /MAX of Northern Illinois 
exceeded $6.6 billion. With a net- 
work of more than 2,200 sales 
associates in 117 offices; RE/MAX 
of Northern Illinois is the second 
largest RE/MAX region in the 
United States. It is part of 
RE/MAX International, Inc., 
which has more than 37,000 sales 
associates operating from more 
than 2,200 offices. 



shareholders, up to 14,633 shares 
of its remaining common stock. 
As a result, the ESOP will own 
over 50 percent. Both purchase 
transactions will be at $300 per 
share. 

"In order to complete the 
transaction, we will be issuing 
$1,500,000 of ABI preferred stock 
in a private placement," 
explained Axton. "We expect the 
preferred stock to be purchased 
by accredited individuals and 
companies in the communities 
we serve, as well as officers and 
members of our board of direc- 
tors. Our next step is to identify 
those qualified investors interest- 
ed in investing in the preferred 
stock issue." 



Lake County Market Area 

Residential Listings Sold 
1/1/93-12/31/93 

Thii bar graph combines tha "sold* realdeniial tilting* of all ollice locationa and indepen- 
dent ollicos of each multi-office or franchise organization identified, which Hating* ware told 
by such organization itself, or with the aid of a cooperating broker, according to publications 
ol the Local Association or Multiple Ustlng Service of Northern Illinois, Inc., in the geographic 
area and tirrie period indicated; 





1 r 






r— - 


1 










RE/MAX' 
Century 21 


n 


4 




i i:i 


-03 




1 


, Coldwcll Banker 


eaWpfceji _■ .. —111 










: 


9.8B 


USTMGSMlD . 
AS Orgmf itm ... 7.571 

R6.VUX 1.JJJ 

CffilixvH » MO* 

Cow*ria**M, ,e» 

Bwd & Worm 4tS 

■gnglltiif 41S 

EM .__.„..^.„„.jia 

Kthn »«»itv„...'_..^„ «T 
««niy EiKUInm lie 


Prudential 






,1 i i 




Baird & Warner 


|e.5< 


Koenig & Strey 

ERA 

Katin Really 


■■■■■14.20 
1 ' 1 
1 '■"■■3.00 

1 t I- 

PHLB 262 


5.75 


Realty Executives 




lit: 





74 



8 10 12 14 16 
PERCENT OF MARKET 



NOTE: This representation is based In whole or in part on data supplied by the Lake County 
Association of REALTORS or the North Shore Board of REALTORS or the Multiple Listing 
Service. Neither the Associations nor the MLS guarantees or is any way responsible for its 
accuracy. Data maintained by the Associations or the MLS may not reflect all real eatate 
.activity in the market. 

Each HE/MAX' office is independently owned end operated 



Look for Your Dream Home 

In This Weeks Lakeland's Classifieds 






HAVING A 



MAY7&8 FROM 10AM -4PM 



This is our big two day 





t and female buffalo names 
I'OyelLt^'old get a chance at winning? 




And we are having a cwffit^Ae^g 
for our two new baby buffs. Kids under 

^el«have<a^foot Barney Mqcanralk, along t# balloons. fogjUte^ 

4 4 4 -JF.i t U .lift: ' ^¥^^^^^-^^0^Wt^' tn » 

kids. ^titeadulU^all^^M^^tatntns 
walls, gardening and pond installMon^^puablc coupons and 
sales.#ers will be hafided out, and ''regtetation for door^prizes 
andjf UNLOCK, patio is free (one Uckelper^M. must be 1^ 
years of age-or/lder). ' Dcm'fJ miss toj£%?crtunifgta«aavc on 
'faefSSl^ shruof atnuals, peUnials. see^fe*^ 
tools and man/ more items to mike your vard beautiful thte summer. 

We're giving away a UNLOCK paoo, 





IB 20 22 24 




S.W. Comer of Routes 83 & 137 Grayslake 223-7000 



r^-*~-t* * r,^. - 



BUSINESS UktlANtJ Newspapers May 6, 1994 




-ReaI Estate Person neIs 



■ i i . <!■ 




February, and that for the 1994 year 
so Tar, she has over $3 million dollars 
under contract in sales. In addition, 
she has accumulated over $30 million 

In career sales. 



Kenosha, Wis., has been named 
Residential Loan Representative' for 
Southern Wisconsin by Northern 
Illinois Mortgage. Her responsibilities 
will be to develop home mortgage 
loans In the Kenosha area. 



LlodaDIabay 

Wildwood resident Linda Dlabay 
posted four unit sales valued at over 
$750,000 In March to surpass SI. 2 
million in 1994 sales volume at 
Century 21 Kreuser and Seller in 
Llbcrtyvillc. Dlabay has been a peren- 
nial multi-million dollar producer 
since entering the real estate business 
in 1985. In addition, she was named 
top lister in February. 

Cherle Smith Zurek 

Cherle Smith Zurek, broker-asso- 
ciate with RE/MAX Homes Northwest 
was presented with the honor of top 
listing agent for the month of 




Rrenda Bersanl 

Grayslakc resident Brcnda Bersanl 
posted sbt unit sales in March to lead 
the Llbcrtyvillc ofnee of Century 21 
Kreuser & Seller. Bersanl Is a licensed 
agent and mulll-miltlon dollar sales- 
person since 1991. 






Donna Barry 

Donna Barry of Mundclein posted 
six unit sales valued at over $850,000 
to lead the LlbertyviHc office of 
Century 21 Kreuser and Seller in 
February. A 17 year Lake County resi- 
dent, Barry has been a licensed agent 
and multi-million dollar producer 
since 1985. 



fulleWard 

Julie Ward, a lifelong resident of 



Sherry Revel I 

Prudential Poc & Poc Realtors, 
Inc. is proud to welcome Sherry 
Rcvcll to their sales team. Rcvcll has a 
savvy combination of background 
expertise, including five years as 
owncrof her own interior design firm, 
and sales vision. In addition to her 
design background, Revell is an expe- 
rienced paralegal, who helps property 
selling or purchasing clients with 
answers to contusing questions. 





ANTIQUES & CRAFTS • ANTIQUES & CRAFTS 




TrevaPulg 

Wauconda resident and Century 
21 Kreuser fcV Seller associate Trcva 
Puig posted sales In excess of $1.1 
million during the first quarter of 
1994. This is Puig's eighth consecu- 
tive year of multi-million dollar pro- 
duction. Her 1993 production exceed- 
ed $3 million. 



New Businesses 

Congratulations to the following 
new businesses, 



•Mouse of Pets Veterinary House 
Call Services, 1313 Devonshire Rd., 
Buffalo Grove, IL G0089. Owned by 
Benjamin Shcchtcr, BuffaloGrovc. ■ 

•Walker Dive Service, ,74 3 1 fill 
Hawley SL, 'Mundclein, IL SOOGO- 
1917. Owned by Robert A. Walker, 
Mundclein and Harriet Walker, 
Mundclein. 

•Tian Chen Pacific Enterprise, 312 
Cambridge Dr., Grayslakc, IL 60030, 
18150 Gramcry Place, Torrance, CA . 
90504. Owned by ZhcngliYao, 312 
Cambridge Dr., Grayslakc, Robert 
Tsc, Grayslakc, Xlaohuan . You, 
Grayslakc. 

•Buco's Game Land, 950 Main St., 
Aniioch, IL 60002. Owned by Randy 
nd wards, Anlloch. 

•A-l Pet Watchers, 42521 N. 
Woodland, Antloch, IL 60002. 

•Vandrush Distributing, 40160 N. 
Circle Ave., Antioch, IL 60002. Owned 
by Allen L and Cynthia M. Vandrush 
of Antioch. 

•Garden Medleys, 366 Clarcwood 
Circle, Grayslakc, 1L 60030. Owned by 
Jane L Josephs, Grayslakc 



m CRAFTS 



•ANTIQUES & CRAFTS •ANTIQUES & CRAFTS 



The Crossroad Merchant offers antiques, atmosphere 



The Crossroad Mer- 
chant, 1328 N. Riverside 
Dr„ McHenry, offers a 
broad range of antiques 
and fine goods due to 
the extra efforts made 
through travels across the 
United States and over- 
seas In England, Germany 
and Scotland. The thrill of 
the hunt for fine quality 
and unusual antiques can 
take people down the 
country back roads or 
side streets In Europe, 
sleepy small towns of the 
old South, fast-paced 
auctions In the North 
Woods, the historical cities 
of New England or Just a 



dusty corner of an attic, 
cellar or barn across 
town. 

All the associates of 
The Crossroad Merchant 
specialize In one or more 
categories of antiques. 
Their knowledge Is valu- 
able to buying the right 
Items at the right price to 
offer to their customers. 
They often share this 
knowledge with cus- 
tomers to help them 
make the right decisions 
when buying antiques. 

Shop arrangement 
and displays are a col- 
laboration of. all the as- 
sociates to produce a 



warm. Interesting atmo- 
sphere for customers. Six 
to eight different front 
window displays are 
done each year with 
themes such as a Victo- 
rian bedroom, and 
Mother Nature In Antiques. 
Their " artfully arranged 
displays within the shop 
help customers visualize 
how they could show and 
use antiques in their own 
homes. 

They will also help cus- 
tomers with Information 
about antique shows, pro- 
vide a "wish book" to 
record Items Ihey may be 



looking for, and offer re- 
pair and restoration ser- 
vices for furniture and vin- 
tage clothing. Besides 
selling to customers, The 
Crossroad Merchant will 
also buy their good qual- 
ity antiques and offer In- 
formal pricing Information. 

To help round out the 
needs of their antique 
collecting customers, 
they also offer fine goods 
like note cards using pho- 
tographs of primitive an- 
tiques, beeswax candles, 
sampler kits (quick and 
easy) to replicate the 
very expensive and 



scarce antiques, soft 
glow electric candle 
lights, homespun, and 
china dolls done by na- 
tional artists, various styles 
of folk art pieces, collec- 
tors books, price and 
shop guides. 

The Crossroad Mer- 
chant also offers the ser- 
vices of Jim Roozee to 
create custom furniture to 
a customer's specifica- 
tions. Country and primi- 
tive styles are his spe- 
cialty. In natural or painted 
finishes. Some of his works 
are usually on display In' 
the shop. 



Gray slate 



Crafts 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayilakc, iL 

Illinois 120 & US 45 

10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

SA TURDA Y & SUNDAY 

MAY 21 &22 . 

ADMISSION $2.00 

Lake County Promotions 
P.O. Box 461 

Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

708/223-1433 or 

708/356-7499 



I 



Grayslake 

Antiques 

& 
Collectibles 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, Illinois 
Illinois 120 & U.S. 45 

8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

SUNDAY 
MAY 8 

Admission § 3.00 




THE 



Crossroad 

MERCHANT- 



ANTIQUES «c FINE GOODS 

Delightfully different shop offal ng 
Victorian, primitive and country antique 
furniture, potlary, Utchanwars. vintage 
clothing, lawairy, toys. Pluscarafuly 
selected goods to coordinate with 
antiques Including fighting, dried florals, 
candles, cards and folk art 

1328 N. Riverside Drive 

McHenry, Illinois 60050 
815/344-2610 

CLOSED TUESDAY 

OTOERDAYS 10-5 SUNDAY 11-4 



DUFFY'S ATTIC 

Antiques & Collectibles 




Anything from Custard 

Glass to Cannon Balls 

Buy & Sell 



CLOCK REPAIR 



Estates Purchased 
22 Center Street, Grayslake 

(708) 223-7454 



£35* Tues.-Sal. 10:00 a.m. • 5:00 p.m. 
- W. sun. 12:00 noon- 4:00pm 



llll lll l lllllllllllllll Hll lllllllllllll H lll l ll ll l^ 




Antique Street 

Antique & Collectible Mall 

Expanding to over 5,000 sq. ft. 

OPEN EVERY DAY 

10:00 am -5:00 pm 

446 N. Morris St. 

EofRt, 45 btw. RL 176 & Hawley 
Showcase or dealer space available 

(708)566-2490 

Ull l lllll l lllllll l ll ll llWll ll l l l l llll ll ll l lllll Bl 



IT'S OUR 26TH ANNUAL 

FAIR DIDDLEY 



OVER 300 CRAFTERS 
•SUNDAY MAY 15TH - 1 1AM TO 5PM 
<3N THE SQUARE IN WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS 
•FREE ADMISSION 
•FREE PARKING - FREE SHUTTLE 
FROM MARIAN CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL 
ONE MILE EAST OF RT. 47 ON RT 120 
•QUALITY HANDCRAFTED ITEMS 
•BAKE SALE IN THE SPRINGHOUSE 
•FAIR DIDDLEY IS A FUNDRAISER 
SPONSORED BY VOLUNTEERS FROM 
THE MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCE LEAGUE 
FOR MCHENRY COUNTY 
•FALL DIDDLEY *94 IS OCTOBER 8 & 9 





if 



i 



l 









j 






i 




Richmond hosts 7th annual Country Festival craft show 



Historic Richmond again celebrates 
a special day for a very special lady 
by hosting Its seventh annual Country 
Festival craft show Mother's Day week- 
end, Saturday and Sunday, May 7 and 

8.V 

Fifty drafters will exhibit at the Country 
Festival craft show from 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. Just one block east of the Intersec- 
tion of Rte. 12 and Rte. 173, adjacent to 
Hunter Country Club. Show organizers 
spent a great deal of time looking for 
additional unique crafters and believe 
that those' attending will want to visit 
these "new" booths. For example, 
there's sculpted- leather Jewelry, finely- 
detailed terra cotta angels filled with 
potpourri, calligraphy notecards with 
handpalnted floral designs, baker's 
dough art wreaths and plaques, 



bracelets incorporating Swarovskl 
crystal, custom macrame lawn furniture, 
salt-glazed stoneware, wooden cra- 
dles and dollhouses, embroidered 
Jackets with wildlife designs, Southwest 
dream catchers, and much, much 
more that's new for this year's show. 

However, visitors to the Country Fes- 
tival craft show will also see a number of 
returning faces, Including Dorothy Lan- 
cour with seagulls; 'and pelicans 
perched on cedar posts with rope trim, 
Robert Hutchens with gourmet Mexican 
salsa, John Sundstedt with hand carved 
walking sticks, PIckeral Meadow cactus 
and succulents, Carol Koehn with 
handpalnted clothing and accessories, , 
and Judy Hoffman with dried and silk 
'.flora! arrangements. 

The aim of show organizers Is to offer 



visitors a wide variety of crafts for the 
home, family and friends In a relaxing 
setting. One of the host sites Is a 1929 
Sears, Roebuck catalog home with 
tulip-lined sidewalks and a unique 
aquatic garden. Next door Is an 1894 
Victorian home, and across the street Is 
a manicured ranch home with spacious 
lawns. All three residences are graced 
with giant shade tress. "It's an Ideal set- 
ting for an outdoor craft show. Every- 
one stopping by seems to enjoy being 
outdoors and leisurely strolling from 
booth to booth," adds show organizer 
•Heidi Hutson. 

The first 600 mothers visiting the Coun- 
try Festival craft show on Saturday and 
Sunday will also receive a free spring 
silk flower, Including daffodils, sweet 
peas, daisies, Iris or tea roses. 



Jn conjunction with the craft show • 
Saturday, a bake sale will be held -. 
starring at 10 a.m. Proceeds will support, 
activities sponsored by the Richmond . 
Police & Kids Drug Awareness pro- 
gram. 

On Sunday from 1 to 2 p.m., visitors 
can enjoy a medley of songs per 1 , 
formed by vocalist Patrick Barnett. who 
entertained at the Country Festival craft 
show two years ago. 

Richmond provides an abundance 
of attractions, Including dozens of an- 
tiques and specialty shops and a num- 
ber of fine restaurants. For further Infor- 
mation on the craft show contact 
Donna Kresch (days) at (815)678-2165 
or Heidi Hutson (evenings) at (81 5)678- 
4045. 



Happy Mother's Daf 

from Gifts To Be Cherished 

For Mom & For Grandma 



THE 

TUUP 

PHTGft 

Handcrafted Gifts 
of Distinction 




390 Lake Street 
Antfoch, IL 60002 
395-7331. 




mm % 




'*** 



Open . 
M.TH..10-6 
■ Frf.....l0-7 
S«L.«104 



WANTED: FLEA MARKET DEALERS 

Also wanted: Antique Dealers, 
Gifiwart Dealers, and Crafters 

Now Featuring Seather Merchants Original Western Antiques 
Indoor 8x10 / Outdoor 10x10 Spaces Available 

OPEN 7 DAYS PER WEEK 

23 North Aye. • Antfoch, IL 

(708) 395-0544 Call Terry or John 





-ESPECIALLY 

MAINE 

ANTIQUES 
16 Years in Long Grove 

An abundance of unique 
and quality antiques 

and old Jewelry. 

Always buying items 

of interest. 

Both Locations at the Mill Pond 

Lower Level in Long Grove 

634-3512 634-0188 

Owner: Penney Welch 




Tfk Emporium 

oj Long GroVe 

A unique, multi- 
dealer shop with 
vintage offerings 
from primitives to 
formal 



cu 



W 



^ 



CRAFTERS GALLERY 

&q/ied gift, 6gf ^ified Ctn/U*, 

8)ay 



&ouAu»eat 

Ouginalt 



Monday 1:00 pm - 6:00 pro 

Tuesday- Friday 10:00 am - 6:00 pm 

Saturday 9:00 an - 5:00 pm 

Sunday 11:00 am • 4:00 pm 




ft 



136 Center St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708) 548-2203jj 



INTRODUCING 



iilMlfii 



f FEATURING « ^ 

Pi 'III Iferll t.sr I hfeltl'fl. /, 

Jurkhiunl hi-nrh and ~*\ 
Sfintti Ff bench Antiques & W^^ 
Rephrns with the flavoi of Western ^ /jj 
Cowboy 'tn«l NiitiV*? Ain*-ncf.m Iinliun 

LOCATED AT 

Park hi'inir \mii|i!i' Mall 

Down/own Antioch 
TOR DIRECTIONS CALL 

(708) 838-1624 



Park IvHiiii 1 tnlip* JfelL 

Announces ti$ 

The opening of a \V>\ i 
4th store in our Mall v^tT 
""EsIsiIpm of Park \\* fc iiiK fc " 

Storewide Sale 

May 6th. 7th & 8th 15% OFF! 

Over 12,000 sq. ft. 40 Deuleis 
OPEN 7 DAYS 10 AM - 5 PM 
345 PARK AVE. 

OFF RT. 83 DOWNTOWN ANTIOCH 

iV^xf '/(k ; !u K$thV5 Co.'f.r je 



rir 



,i 



ANTIQUE 
MALL 

Antioch, Illinois 
FEATURING 

20 DEALERS 

Channel Lake 
Schoolhouse 

Rts. 173 & Ukc Ave. 

3 1/2 miles tvest of Rte. 83 
onRle. 173 

Dealers Welcome 

14,000 sq. ft. available 

Open 6 dap 10-5 

Closed Tuesdays 

(708) 395-0000 




GIFT & THRIFT 

• High Quality Used Clothing 
•Useable Furniture A Household Goods 
•Antiques & Collectibles 
>• Handmade International Gifts 

Hourr Mon.Fri. KMM-S.-Q0 
Saturday 10:00-4:00 

329 Seymour (Hawlty Commons) 
Hundttein 



949-5066 




inamosa 



Gflntit 



WE BUY & RESTORE ANTIQUES 

One Item Or Entire Estate 



Spedaizing in Fumitore...Forma) To Country 

Depression Giass, Toys, Dob, Rimitiw Accessories, CobdUes 

S Minutes West of Gumee M8i Man 



356-0832 



Ju»t Watt of Rl 45 on RL 132 • 19058 W. Grand Ave. 



Coming Soon To Li6ertyviC(e 

Before 8 After Ceranic Shoppe, Inc. 

GREENWARE - FIRINGS - PAINTS - SUPPLIES 

CHILDREN - ADULT - SENIOR CLASSES 

MORNING - AFTERNOON & EVENING 

Beginners to Advance 
Student • Senior • Group Discounts 

CHILDREN'S BIRTHDAY PARTIES 

(Pre-Opening Class Specials 

can (708) 816-6212 



Jor purifier (Details 



A 






MsaeOH 




BUSINESS UcIancI Newspapers M*y 6, 1994 



Hawthorn Bank appoints ' 
Logar vice president in lending 




The Board of Directors of 
Hawthorn Bank has appointed 
Donald R. Logar vice president in 
lending. Logar brings more than 
10 years lending experience to 
Hawthorn Bank, 

Gregory S, Kobus stated, "Wc 
welcome Don to the bank and 
look forward to working with him 
as Hawthorn Bank grows. Don's 
expertise in lending, especially in 
our community, is noteworthy. 
Wc arc confident that Don's busi- 
ness expertise will contribute to 
the success of Hawthorn Bank. 

"Hawthorn Bank stresses per- 
sonal service, the ability to deal 
directly with management and 



rapid response time for loan re- 
quests. Hawthorn Bank is 
uniquely qualified to serve the 
community and continue to ac- 
commodate this growing region 
in Lake County." * 

Hawthorn Bank, a $25 million 
independent community bank, is 
in its new headquarters on Rtc. 60 
in Mundclcin and offers com- 
plete banking services to both 
individual and commercial cus- 
tomers. 

For further information, con- 
tact Gregory S. Kobus, chairman 
and president, Hawthorn Bank, 
208 Oak Creek Plaza, Mundclcin, 
IL 60080, phone 949-9000. 



«1 



changing 



TINA L. SWIECH 



Export seminar on overseas sales 



"Principles of Exporting: How 
to Develop Overseas Sales" will 
be the topic of a half-day seminar 
at the College of Lake County on 
Thursday, May 19. Sponsored by 
the Center for Economic 
Development's Small Business 
Export Development Center, the 
workshop will be held from 1 to 4 
p.m., with registration beginning 
at 12:30 p.m. in room C003. 

The program is designed for 
business owners, executives, 
managers and individuals in- 
terested in learning the basics of 
fast-track exporting and how to 
increase sales and profits by sell- 
ing products in International 
markets. The workshop will be 



led by Don Harlow, CLC's export 
development specialist, who has 
30 years experience in interna- 
tional business and sales in more 
than 65 countries. 

The informal, hands-on work- 
shop will cover the following top- 
ics: Making a commitment to 
export; assessing products and 
export potential; researching 
overseas markets and opportuni- 
ties; determining market entry; 
developing a strategy plan; locat- 
ing overseas customers /distribu- 
tors; shipping; and receiving pay- 
ment. 

The cost is $50. Visa, Master- 
Card and Discover will be ac- 
cepted. To register, call 223-3633. 



Staff Reporter 

The family owned J&L Oil cor- 
poration is getting a new look and 
a new name. 

Some of the selected locations 
in Illinois arc transforming into 
Union 76 stations. Five have 
been completed so far, with more 
on the way. 

The Wildwood station on Rtc. 
45 is currently being changed 
over, and their arc ten more in 
the works: Haincsvillc on Rtc. 
120, Antioch on Rtc. 173, 
Inglcsidc on Rollins Rd., 
Evans ton, Morrison, Aurora, 
Spring Valley, Rock Falls, 
Savanna and Oregon. 

The modifications have been 
quite exciting, said Pat Ryan, 
vice-president of marketing. 

Included in the changes arc 
new staff uniforms with the blue, 
white and orange colors; an 
entire scries of training programs 
for employees; promotional 
opportunities; and of course new 
signs. 




Grayslake village and chamber officials were on hand Monday to 
celebrate the groundbreaking ceremony for Rockonbach 
Chevrolet. The 68-year-old dealership Is building a new, larger 
facility on Route 120 between Routes 63 and 45. Pictured with 
shovels from left to right are Gary Rockonbach, Mayor Pat Carey, 
Doug Rockonbach and Bonnie Rockonbach. —Photo by Neal 
Tucker 

» 

Rockenbach breaks ground 



BusiiNESs Person neIs 




Richard E. Brown 

The Chicago Tasky Agency of 
MassMutual is proud lo announce 
that Richard E. Brown of Lake Zurich 
has joined their firm. Richard will be 
working among business owners, 
professionals, executives and families 
to provide for their needs in estate, 
retirement planning and the estab- 
lishment of financial security pro- 
grams. Richard will be involved in the 
sale of life and disability insurance as 
well as tax deferred annuities. 



William E. Relf stock II 

William E. Reifsteckll, who lives in 
Kildccr with his wife Cathy and their 
three children, has Joined Alter Design 
Builders as vice president A 16-year 
veteran of the construction and con- 
struction-marketing industry, 
Reifsteck received a bachelor and 
master's degree from the State 
University of New York in 1979. 





Lisa Koryta Wortsmann 

. Lisa Koryta Wortsmann has been 
promoted to assistant controller in the 
pharmaceutical products division at 
Abbott Laboratories. Wortsmann, who 
resides in Glenview with her husband 
Mark, joined the company in 1986 as 
an internal auditor. She holds a BS 
from the University of Illinois and an 
MBA from DePaul University in 
Chicago. 



w 



Read then 
Recycle 



Rockenbach Chevrolet has 
officially broken ground a new 
facility in Grayslake. 

" Wc just outgrew our current 
setup," said the dealership presi- 
dent Douglas Rockenbach, 
"We've been experiencing phe- 
nomenal growth over the last few 
years. Currently we're operating 
out of several separate pieces of 
property. And, parking for our 
customers is at a premium. Wc 
figured wc owed it to our cus- 
tomers as well as our employees 
to put together a modern and 
functional facility." 

The new dealership facility, 
designed and built by Basil 



Associates of Northflcld, will 
occupy 50,000 square feet on 10 
acres, the new dealership will 
dedicate 30,000 of those feet to 
the service department. This 
space allotment will cnahlc the 
dealer to offer faster, more effi- 
cient service with up to 35 techni- 
cians. 

The new facility will also 
enable the dealership to stock 
over 700 new and used vehicles, 
giving Rockenbach the largest 
Chevy and Geo inventory north 
of Chicago. Rockenbach Chev- 
rolet Geo is a family owned and 
operated business, selling cars in 
Lake County since 1926. 



ERA®-Results Real Estate. Inc. t=r 

641 Barron Blvd., (Rt. 83), Grayslake, Illinois 60030 STnTZ, 

Bus: (708) 223-7777 fffl 

"If Wc Don't Soil Your Hou.c, ERA Will Buy IT!" 



ettain condition i apply. For details, ask to see a copy of (he Seller'* Security® Plan, contract from your local ERA bicker. 





Maure itm i urounti ihii Iwely } 6e*twrn hjObdt itath. The 
fcitdv ■ ha beti rtttnly rtraakkd ud the bcAoom In ifjjr 
p«i ntil k it Ii rr «Jy f a you 10 nov ( mo. Thcrt'i pkuy of ma «p 
la the bat mot tin Ihc sick uodci g'n< mui bo inert trupuaf 
chieujji tie wtahcrlofcl ioiide from the [infc. Offered a only 

t O6,0OO.RI?37. 




la Tint BuycrvCur : btoYoom Cm?t Cod with c ratal tfelUKdt 

ionrrfycu/TLC. Offcrcd * oety *58,500. <1JH. 




BtaiufuEy nRDdrtai ruclt with wood txniH turpi*". !*•(<, 
kctted in ■ quirt K«rtKihood « • wooded lot. RIJH. 



Warm Up 
To This 

Offer 




Steven A. Hanberg, MD 

Steven A. Hanbcrg, MD, has Joined 
a three-doctor medical practice which 
incorporates internal medicine, criti- 
cal care medicine, cardiology and 
endocrinology. Dr. Hanbcrg Is board 
certified in internal medicine, a spe- 
cialty focusing on general healthcare 
for adults, who has been practicing in 
Lake County since 1989. Dr. Hanberg 
received his medical degree from the 
University of Illinois at Chicago, 
College of Medicine, and completed 
his internship and residency in inter- 
nal medicine at Loyola University 
Medical Center. 

Kathleen Hufnagle, MD 

Dr. Kathleen Hufnagle of Agape 
Chiropractic Center of Lake Villa has 
completed an intensive post graduate 
course on the AMA guidelines to the 
evaluation of permanent medical 
conditions, including losses of bodily 
functions and impairments. Dr. 
Hufnagle plans to implement these 
skills to better serve her patients who 
have been injured In automobile, fall 
down and work accidents. 



We have exciting news! For a limited time, 
you can sign up for home delivery at a reduced 
rate of $19.50 for one year. And as our gift to 
you, enjoy a complimentary Lakeland 
Newspapers mug with a sample of gourmet cof- 
fee, and a coupon for a free McDonald's break- 
fast sandwich. Or, take advantage of a two year 
subscription at just $34.00 - that's only 5$ per 
day! Call us to begin your subscription today at 
(708) 223-8161, or complete and return the 
form below. 



YOUR 

COMMUNITY 
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Chooie Newtpiper: 
O Antioch Newt- Reporter 
O Fox Lake Pre u 
□ Crayilake Time* 
O Gumee Preu 
D Lake VlUt Record 
D Lake Zurich Enterprise 
DUbertyvtlleNew. 
D Undenfaiur it Newt 
D Mundeleln Newt 
D Round Uke News 
P Vernon Hilts New* 
D Warren -Newport Preu 
O Wiucondi Leader * 



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WAiWIi ! 



May *r 1994 UcIancI Newspapers BUSINESS 




■1] 
A 



-This WAy To WEAlrh WSM'% 

Full service mutual funds, or how 
not to panic when market goes down 



TERRANCE R. GAERTNER 
' This Is another in a scries of. 
articles addressing the concerns 
of mutual fund investors. 

A reader asked, "I have read in 
one of the popular financial mag- 
azines that I should never pay an 
up front sales charge for any 
mutual fund that I buy. Do you 
agree?" 

This is a good question and 
one that you should ask yourself 
before you embark on establish- 
ing a portfolio of mutual funds. 

Investors not astute 

While it is often not the case, 
most individuals consider them- 
selves to be astute investors. - 
Statistics quickly disprove that 
statement, but the fact remains 
that many individuals have had 
one or two successful invest- 
ments that makes them forget 
about the not-so-successful ones. 
It is funny how our memory 
works. 

Lets look at when, in my opin- 
ion, it pays to make a sales charge 
to purchase* a mutual fund. If you 
are truly knowledgeable about 
the ins and outs of investing and 
have the time to research the 
many hundreds of mutual funds 
on the market today, you proba- 
bly do not need the services of a 
professional broker or financial 
planner. For most of the investing 
public, this is simply no the case. 

Most people investing in j 
; ■ mutual, funds could benefit from 
working with a financial planner 
who can add value to their invest- 
ment portfolio. First, by helping 
them to select the funds that arc 



right for meeting their invest- 
ment objectives and time hori- 
zons. 

Second, by helping them to 
track the progress of their portfo- 
lio and third, and most impor- 
tantly, by holding their hand dur- 
ing market downturns, such as 
we have seen recently, to avoid 
panic selling. 

Bad short terms 

Most mutual funds arc bad 
short term investments. The long 
term investor is much better off 
than the investor chasing the 
"hottest" trend. The trend chaser 
will be destined to buy high and 
sell low. 

It is a fact that mutual funds 
purchased through a broker (full 
service funds) have a holding 
period that is twice as long as 
mutual funds marketed directly 
to the public (no service funds), 
the result is that the owners of full 
service mutual funds stand a bet- 
ter chance to reap the long term 
benefits of mutual funds. 

An argument can also be made 
that mutual funds with tower 
shareholder turnover arc easier 
to manage. This is because the 
fund manager docs not have to 



always have significant cash posi- 
tions or sell securities into a 
falling market to handle share- 
holder receptions 

What Is Important 

Do not loose perspective on 
what is really important. Proper 
asset allocation and underlying 
investment performance occur- 
ring while you arc still able to 
sleep at night arc more important 
than the fees you pay or don't 
pay. 

Today's investment decisions 
are not simple. You will need to 
decide for yourself, but I believe 
that a financial planner who is 
doing his or her job properly will 
easily justify the cost of doing 
business with that planner. 

Editor's note: Terrance R. 
Gaertner, a certified financial 
planner and certified, public' 
accountant, is president of 
Chicago Financial Advisors, Inc., 
Chicago, a financial planning 
company for individuals and 
business. He is a member of a 
panel of financial experts prepar- 
ing Tfiis Way to Wealth. Questions 
are invited by writing or called 
Gaertner at 118 N. Clinton St., 
Chicago, IL 60606, (312)993-7778. 




Lexington Homos created the position of Director of 
Community Operations to guarantee total customer satis- 
faction. These on-site ombudsmen will assist new home 
buyers. Here Lexington's first three DCO's, Doug Mills, Fran 
Frost and Steve Sandelln check blueprints with Rich Dwyer, 
construction manager at the Princeton Club.— Photo cour- 
tesy of Lexington Homes 



Diamond Travel appoints counselor 



Manuals available from EPA 

In 1992 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) revised its 
Workers Protection Standard (WPS) for Agricultural Pesticides. 
Employers of agricultural workers must comply with the WPS and the 
revisions took effect April 15. 

Workers can obtain the manual at the Lake County Unit of the 
University of Illinois Cooperative Extension Service, located at 100 S. 
Highway 45 in Grayslake. 



Diamond Travel, Inc., at 39 
Zieglcr Drive in Grayslake, has 
anounccd the appointment of 
Captain Olof II. Ohlson, certified 
travel counselor, as an associate 
travel counselor. 

Ohlson comes to the agency 
with experience as a Cunard 
Cruise director and Travel 
Bureaux manager aboard the 
RMS Queen Elizabeth and the 
RMS Queen Mary. 

To accomodate extra 
appointments, Diamond Travel is 
extending their hours on 
Saturday, opening from 9 am. to 
1 p.m. These hours arc in addi- 
tion to their regular daily hours of 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Diamond Travel 
can be reached at 223-6300. 







Ofof Ohlson 





Mommy Julie- 

You are the 

bestest Mommy 

in the whole world! 



We lave you- 




Tommy and 
Christopher 



Thanks for rQ-. 
being such ^*j 




L 



igrett 
monwn-liw. \[ 
Roseann & Dave 

Nicole, Steven, 
Kristine & Crystal 



L 



Happy Mother's Day 

to someone 

who really 

knows how to 

{'hold up the fence!" 

I LOVE YOU! 

Miss Bumblebee Girtl 




Mom, 

Let 3 havt the best 

Mother's Day ever ... In die mall! 

Charge III 

Love, 
Nancy &. Joel 






Carol, 



Happy 



Mother's Day! 

You're m Great 2nd Mom! 
Your Daughter-in-Law, 
Arlene 



Mom 

' Thanks for being 
there. for me and your 
grandchildren - We 
love you and always 
appreciate everything 
you have done for us. 
With All of our Love, 

Cathy, Kyle, Kaja 




Teresa, 

Happy 
Day* 

From 

Ariene, Carol, Nancy, 






Dear Mora- 

Just another way 

of saying 

"I Love You 

and appreciate 

your always being 

here for me. 
Happy Mother*i Day! 

Love Always- 
Peg 



MOMMY- 

Coo-coo for air 
those funny faces. 
Without you, I'd be 

a normal person. 

LOVE, 

Your Weiameeta-Eatin 
Moon Baby 





Liebe Mutter, «j*{ 

Ich sage nichts, daS ich 

dich Hebe, rue genug. 

Aber du wriBt, daB du 

„Schmecht als Ozean!" 

Mil Kussen imd Umarmen. 

De he liebchtn, 
Tina uod Steve 



Auntie Bobbie Jo, 

Thanks for filling 

in for my Mommy 

when she is at work, 

or busy. I love going 

Bye-Bye with you 

Love & Kisses, 

Valeri K 





PMcia- 

Thanks for 

everything you'da 

Qe fove yaul 
P&nntf Karen, Aet&y 

fCaiy, fort} Coffeen 

and Carrie 





HI MOMMY LARA 
I'm SO 

proud of you 

$$$- 'chow 



Dorothie 
Murphy, 

Mother's Day! 

All our love, 

Bill Kate, Rory, 

Colleen & Carrie 



Happy 
Mother's Day 

to an incredible mom. 
Known widely for her 

cakes & apple slices. 

. Welcome back to 
the old neighborhood! 

All Our Love, 

||>Pat,Darce, 
John & Dana 



MOM, YOU'RE 
THE BEST! 

Thanks for . 
doing our laundry! 

Where did you 

hide all the pop? 

LOVE, 

LOUISE & 
MICHELLE 





Mom- 

This Mother's Day is 
so special to have you 
still with us. We love 
,. you very much! 

Mike, Susan, Angela, 

Heather, Megan, Mary, 

Jessie, Wyatt, Rick, Julie, 

Bob, Lynn, Nicholc, Gabriel, 

Dan, Fonda, Sabrina, 

Danielle, Geoqgc, Colleen, 

Weston, Cameron & Dad. 

Stay Healthy 



DEAR MOMMY, 

Thanks for 

being my 
MOMMY & 
DADDY!... 

I love you! 
VALERI K 

P.S. I'll try to remember 

not to pull your hair 

in the morning 




Mom- 

This is the 

perfect time to 

tell you that you 

mean so much to me. 

Have a wonderful 

Mother's Day. 

Thanks for being there 

^L^ Love, 
|p~ Arlene 




Alyce Hseert 

Roses erf red, 

Violets are blue] 
every baby should have 
a Grandma like you! 
Happy Mother's Day 
Love, 
Jeppy, Teresa, Kuriti 
&Baby"H* 



r 
r ' 

S 




BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UkclANtl Newspapers M*y 6, 1994 




jtnnouaces 5 . 




Richard Loldor, founder of Leldor's Gordon Greonory 
chocks tho blossoms on a hanging fuscla baskot. After 65 
years In the business, Lelder still works dally at the 
greenhouse.— Photo by Neal Tucker 

Nursery— 

From page CI ^ 

discasc-frec stock, and it is 
Richard's daunting task to take 
the cuttings from that small 
group in order to raise the 20,000 
they do annually of just that one 
species. 

Richard did not actually got 
into the business full time until 
1945, after serving his country in 
the Air Corps. First, he got mar- 
ried to his present wife, Marion, 
in June of 1943, after he was 
assured he would not be sta- 
tioned over seas due to an car 
problem. Regardless, he ended 
up in Guam. 

After completing his service, 



Now through May 15, Bay 
Oaks Development will offer 5.5 
percent financing with no points 
to qualified customers on Bay 
Oaks lot purchases, 

Bay Oaks offers spacious living 
in the midst of an area rich in nat- 
ural history. Located in rolling 
hills, overlooking a lake, sur- 
rounded by natural habitat and 
near a golf course, Bay Oaks 
offers a superior site for new cus- 
tom homes. 

The unique landscape of the 
parcel provides a breath-taking 
view of Lac (Lake) Loucttc. The 
360 -acre development has 160 
acres in the middle of the proper- 
ty designed as a wetland preserve 
and natural resource area. 

"We arc located in one of the 
biggest recreational areas in 
Northern Illinois, right next to 
Moraine Hills State Park and Volo 
Bog Conservation Area," said Joe 
Buralli, developer and owner of 



Bay Oaks Development 

"People are buying here 
because of the aesthetics of Bay 
Oaks," states Joe DcBuck, project 
manager. "They like the country 
feel of the area and the lake and 
the fact that many of the lots arc 
wooded." 

The site features the majestic 
beauty of an old style barn and a 
3,600-squarc foot stone house 
converted into a clubhouse. The 
clubhouse will feature saunas, a 
game room and kitchen. Two 
tennis courts, a swimming pool 
and a pavilion overlooking the 
lake arc nearly completed. 

Homcsitcs offer convenience 
as well as affordabllity. One to 
three acre homesltes start as low 
as $47,900 and home and lot 



packages begin at $205,000. 

Bay Oaks covenants require a 
minimum square footage of 
2,500-squarc feet for a ranch and 
2,000-squarc feet for a two-story 
home. Brick and/or cedar exteri- 
ors arc required on all the homes. 
All home plans must be approved 
by an architectural review board. 
The average home will.be a two 
story with four bedrooms, 2 1/2 
baths,, kitchen, dining room; liv- 
ing room, family room, library 
and first floor laundry room. 

Located off Rte. 134," three 
miles west of Rte. 12, Bay Oaks 
is convenient to the Fox Lake 
train station, Pistakec Country 
Club and Moraine Hills State 
Park. For more information, call 
487-4040. 



Is Your Nest Getting Too Crowded? 

Shop for a New One In Lakeland Real Estate Classifieds 



he rented a greenhouse in 
Melrose Park. Later, he bought a 
greenhouse in Arlington Heights 
on Dempster Street, which 
United Airlines purchased in 
1965. He then bought a green- 
house in Libertyville on Rockland 
Road by the toll way, which he 
sold in 1973. 

H is next business stop was the 
current location of the green- 
house, which was just an open 
field among many open fields 
back then. 

Richard and his wife also 
raised three daughters, all of 
which who live in northern 
Illinois. He is quick to point out 



that he has been blessed with 
three wonderful son-in-laws. 

The most dramatic changes in 
his Held have come with automa- 
tion. Much of the foliage is plant- 
ed and watered mechanically. He 
also sees a great future in the 
nursery business with the new 
attention being given to environ- 
mental concerns. He plans on 
being around to sec the innova- 
tions continue to unfold. 

I'll keep doing this as long as 
my health allows," he says when 
asked about his plans for retire- 
ment, "I look forward to coming 
into work everyday, to maybe 
help out a little if 1 can.. 






CASH TODAY IS WORTH MORE 
THAN CASH TOMORROW! 

We can't stop the declining value of 
money. What we can offer is cash now to 
eliminate the uncertainty of tomorrow. 

For most of us this is not a new concept, 
but rather a constant reminder of the 
declining value of money. Thankfully, as a 
private mortgage holder you may be able to 
do something about it 

To receive a free quote on what your mortgage is worth TODAY call; 
SECURE FUNDING 548-1390 

All calls strictly confidential 





SONG'S TAMWON DO AND KUNG-FU SCHOOL 

ANNOUNCES THEIR 



Mother^ 



SPECIALLY SELECTED 

YE 

WERE $50.00 





WHILE 
SUPPLIES LAST 



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AND; 

HiCKSH (UPRIGHT) 20-24" HEIGHT 



A family of growsrt • Establish** In 1919 

KOEUNES 

FLOWER FARM 

RT.45 
3/4 Mile North of 
Rt. 173,Antloch 

(708) 395-0101 








MAY Hours: Mon-Wed-Frl & Sat 8-4 
Tuos & Thurs 8-7 
' Sun 9-2 






For 
Membership 



or 




off 
Single 
Membership 

Offer Good Thru 5/14/94 






We'll Fit Your Schedule 

MORNING CLASSES 

Mon.-Sat. 10-11 a.m. 

AFTERNbON CLASSES 

Mon.-Fri. 12:30-1:30 p.m. 

EVENING CLASSES 

Mon.-Fri. 4:30-5:30 p.m.; 6-7 p.m. and 7:30-8:30 p.m. 

Don't Miss This Opportunity Te Learn Martial Mris 



Antioch 
395-9039 



Grayslake 
223-0887 



Muncielein 
566-4665 






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M*y *, 19*4 lAlcclANd Newspapers 'BUSINESS 







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OBITUARIES LaIceIancj Newspapers May 6, 1994 



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Florence Dittmer, nee Hleuia 

85 years young, passed, away peacefully on Easter 
Sunday, April 3, 1994 at her home In Englewood, FL. A 
glorious day to be called by the Lord to join him. 

Florence had been a resident of Antloch, IL for 25 
years prior to moving to Florida in 1970 with her hus- 
band of 62 years, Fred. They came to the Grass Lake area 
from Evanston with their four children. 

A lady of Immeasurable determination, strength 
and a zest for life and living, she made their home in 
Antioch a place for family picnics, a fishing and hunting 
meeting spot for her husband and friends. Wives often 
requested her recipes not only for duck but other wild 
game dishes she was famous for preparing. 

She was a ready volunteer, first at St. Mary's School 
in Evanston and in Antloch with her children in their 
schools and as a 4-H leader. She also volunteered for the 
Red Cross in Waukegaa 

She worked at Nellsen's Comers, Joe and Helen's 
Loon Lake Resort and Plckard China, all in or around 
Antloch. 

Florence was bom in Chicago, IL May 27, 1908, the 
youngest of nine children. She was preceded in death by 
her parents and sisters and brothers. 

She and her husband were charter members of the 
Englewood Eagles Club, #3885. In the Auxiliary she held 
offices of President, Vice President, Secretary, and 
Sunshine Lady. Again, her volunteering spirit prevailed 
and she was a willing and ready participant in every 
fund raising event for charity: Sunday breakfasts, special 
dinners, rock-a-thon dances and never missed joining 
fellow members in the Englewood Pioneer Days Parade. 
Florence was a member of the Englewood 
Grandmothers Club and St Raphael's Parish. 

On April 22, 1932 Florence and Fred were married in 
Chicago. They had four children who survive: Fred II of 
Cape Coral, FL, Richard "Bud* (Pat) of Gurnee, IL, 
Donna Olson of Bristol, WI and Jerry (Pauline) of La 
Crosse, WI. She had eleven grandchildren and one 
great-granddaughter. Her grandson Fred III preceded 
her in death. 

It has been a privilege to have known someone of 
Florence Klelna Dlttmer's stature, loving nature, willing- 
ness to help, love of God and Country, and above all her 
attitude of "don't just sit around - get up and do some- 
thing"! She will be missed. 

A memorial mass for Florence will be said by Fr. 
Hanley at St. Peter's Church in Antioch, IL, Rts. 59 and 
173 on Tuesday, May 10, 1994 at 11:00 sum. 

Elmer P. Adams 

Age 75 of Round Lake and Fox Lake, IL went to rest 
Thursday, April 28, 1994 at his residence. He was bom 
May 10, 1918 in Spring Grove, IL to John and Margaret 
Schaefer Adams. Mr. Adams attended DePaul University 
and became a certified public accountant in 1948. With 
more than 45 years of experience, he started the Elmer P. 
Adams CPA Firm In Fox Lake. The firm grew to become 
the Adams, Uselton & Busch CPA firm of Spring Grove. 
Adams was an accountant and member of the board of 
directors at McHenry State Bank from 1974 to 1990. He 
was also on the board of directors for Northlake Bank in 
Northlakc, Illinois. He was a member of St. Bedes 
Catholic Church in Inglesidc, IL and an Army Air Force 
veteran of World War II. 

He Is survived by his wife Patricia (nee Mestan), 
whom he married October 15, 1960 at St Bedes Catholic 
Church in Ingleslde. Other survivors include three 
daughters Kelly Danca of Lake Villa, IL, Stacy (John} 
Raquet of Llbertyville, IL and Noel Adams of Round 
Lake, IL; two sons Jeff (Kim) Adams of Ingleslde and 
Curtis (Kristen) Adams of Round Lake, IL; two grand- 
children Ashley Lageotakes and Caidyn Raquet; two sis- 
ters Eleanor and Alvlna Adams, both of Ingleslde; and 
two brothers Raymond (June) Adams of Seminole, FL 
and Harold (Gerl) Adams of Spring Grove, IL. He was 
preceded in death by his parents and one brother, 
Charles. 

Visitation was held Sunday, May 1, 1994 from 3 pm 
until 9 pm at the George R. Justen & Son Funeral Home, 
3519 W. Elm St, McHenry, IL Funeral Mass was 
Monday, May 2, at 10 am in St Bede's Catholic Church, 
Ingleslde, IL Interment was at Grant Cemetery, 
Ingleslde, IL Memorials greatly appreciated to the Villa 
Desiderata Retreat House in care of the Rev. Eugene 
Lutz, 3015 Bay View Road, McHenry, IL 60050. 

Elizabeth G. Souther 

. Age 40 of Waukegah, IL passed away Thursday, April 
28, 1994 at St Therese Medical Center, Waukegan, IL 
She was bom January 7, 1954 In Portland, Oregon, the 
daughter of the late Calvin Nathaniel and Bette 
(Zimmerll) Souther. She has lived In northern Illinois 
since 1981. 

Survivors include her daughter, Michelle Ann 
Souther of Waukegan, IL and her twin sister, Marghle S. 
(William) Weber of Lake Villa, IL Services and Interment 
will be private. There will be no visitation. Arrangements 
were handled by the Strang Funeral Home, 1055 Main 
SURte. 83), Antioch, IL 



Adrian E. Watts, nee Sutton . 

Age 79, a 50 year Fox Lake area resident, and a 
recent resident of Clifton, IL died on April 28; 1994 at die 
home of her daughter at Clifton, IL She was bom at 
Osceola, IA on July 7, 1914. She was the daughter of the 
late John Sutton and Lillian Fleming Sutton. She was a 
graduate and was the Salutatorlan at the Llbertyville 
Township High School with the Class of 1932. She then 
obtained her B.S. Degree at Chicago Teachers College, 
and later her Master's Degree at Roosevelt University in 
Chicago. Later she taught at the Round Lake Grade 
School and the Lake Villa B.I. Hooper Grade School. 
Mrs. Watts was a member of the following: American 
Legion Post 703 Ladles Auxiliary, Grant Township 
Republican Club, Lake County Retired Teachers 
Association, Milks Grove .Extension Association, 
A.A.R.P., Fox Lake Silver Foxes, Fox Lake Quilting 
Queens, a member of the Lutheran Church of All Saints 
In Fox Lake, and was most active in all activities at the 
Fox Lake Community Center. During World War II Mrs. 
Watts acted as a Grey Lady while her late husband, 
Major Charles W. Watts, U.S. Army, was sent overseas. 
She and her son accompanied her husband to many 
state side bases. Mrs. Watts, along with her son, were 
included with one of the first group of dependents to be 
shipped overseas. Both in wartime and in peacetime, 
she traveled worldwide in Europe, the Far East and 
most of the United States. 

Survivors Include her daughter Adrlanne (Charles) 
Haley of Clifton, IL; one son John (Rose) Watts of Fox 
Lake; two grandsons John Watts of Fox lake and 
Benjamin Haley of Clifton, IL; two granddaughters 
Deborah (Robert) Nordmeyerof Fox Lake and Charlotte 
Haley of Clifton, IL; one great-grandson Brandon 
Nordmeyen and one sister Greta (George) Rupp of 
Pennsylvania. Nieces and nephews and other relatives 
survive. Mrs. Watts was preceded in death by two broth- 
ers William and Chet; by five sisters Ruby, Von, Cedar, 
Fran and Glad; and by her late husband Charles W. 
Watts on April 28, 1988. 

Friends of the family may gather at the K.K. 
Hamsher Funeral Home, 12 N. Plstakee Lake Rd., Fox 
Lake (in the Chapel on the Lake) at 3:30 p.m. on Friday, 
where funeral services will be conducted at 4:00 p.m. on 
Friday, May 6, 1994. In lieu of flowers, the family will 
appreciate memorials for the Hospice of Kankakee 
Valley or the Fox Lake Community Club Seniors 
Program For information please call (708) 587-2100. 

William E. Bergraark 

Age 77 of Antioch, IL passed away Wednesday, April . 
27, 1994 at Kenosha Hospital and Medical Center, 
Kenosha, WI. He was bom December 10, 1916 in 
Chicago, IL moving to the Antioch area in 1959. He 
attended the United Methodist Church of Antioch and 
was a member of the Loyal Order of the Moose Lodge 
#525 of AnUoch. He was a US Army veteran of World War 
II and received a Purple Heart He was a member of VFW 
Post #8375 of Silver Lake, WI. Mr. Bergmark retired In* 
1981, after 35 years with Jays Foods Inc. of Chicago and 
Silver Lake, WI as a salesman. On February 15, 1940 he 
married Frances L Howell In Valparaiso, Indiana and 
she preceded him In death on August 7, 1980. 

Survivors Include three daughters, Trudy (Andrew) 
Anderson of Antioch, Susan Landsell of Lincolnshire, IL 
and Blllle (Dennis) Horton of Antloch. Grandfather of 
nine, great grandfather of thirteen. He was also preced- 
ed In death by one grandson, Christopher E. Horton on 
March 5, 1994. 

Funeral services were held at 11:00 am Monday, 
May 2, 1994 at the Strang Funeral Home, 1055 Main St- 
(Rte. 83), Antioch, IL. Interment was at Hillside 
Cemetery, Antloch, IL 

Constance C. Wick 

Age 51 of Lake Villa, IL passed away Sunday, May 1, 
1994 at St Luke Medical Center, Milwaukee, WI. She was 
born February 8, 1943 In Waukegan, IL, the daughter of 
Frank and Stella (Yucus) Krlsnar and has been a life long 
resident of Lake County. She was a member of St Peter 
Church of Antioch. Mrs. Wick was a Secretarial 
Contractor, having worked In Medical and Insurance 
Fields and currently as a Legal Secretary for Attorney. 
Raymond Boldt of Mundeleln, IL On April 8, 1961 she 
married John D. Wick In Waukegan, IL. 

Survivors include her* husband John; two sons 
Jeffrey of Salem, WI and David of Lake Villa, IL; one 
grandson Alexander Wick; her mother Stella Yucus 
Krlsnar of Waukegan; her maternal grandmother Sophie 
Yucus of Waukegan, IL; her mother and father-in-law 
Jack and Cordy Wick of Lake Villa, IL; also by many aunts 
and uncles, cousins and friends. She was preceded In 
death by her rather Frank Krlsnar In 1988. 

Funeral services with Mass of Christian Burial were 
held at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, May 5, 1994 at St Peter 
Church, 557 Lake St, Antioch, IL Interment was In 
Ascension Cemetery, Llbertyville, IL Friends called at 
the Strang Funeral Home, 1055 Main St (Rte. 83), 
Antloch, IL from 4 until 8 p.m. Wednesday. Those desir- 
ing may make contributions to the American Cancer 
fund In her memory. 



Edwin Jankowiak 

Age 77, a Lake Villa, IL resident for the past 37 years, 
formerly of Chicago, IL died Thursday, April 21, 1994 at 
the Victory Memorial Hospital In Waukegan, He was 
born January 11, 1917 In Chicago, IL Mr. Jankowiak was 
a former 25 years Drill Manufacturing Foreman for the 
Avildsen Drill Manufacturing Company of Chicago, had 
been retired for 14 years from Tru-Cut Inc. in Cary, IL 
He was a member of Prince of Peace Catholic Church In 
Lake Villa and was an avid horseshoe player belonging 
to numerous Horseshoe Leagues for the past 15 years In 
the West Lake County area. 

He Is survived by his wife, Louise Jankowiak (nee , 
Eckert) of Lake Villa; a son James (Lynn) Jankowiak of 
Rio de Janiero, Brazil; a daughter Janice Sykora of 
Waukegan; seven grandchildren; two brothers Zygumdt 
(Lottie) Jankowiak of Chicago, and Henry (Phyllis) 
Moraga of California; two sisters Marlon Kwasnlewski of 
New Jersey, and Isabelle Budziak of Chicago. He was 
preceded In death by a sister, Estelle Sorge. 

Friends of the family may call from 4:00 to 9:00 PM 
Friday, April 22, 1994 at the K.K. Hamsher Funeral 
Home, 12 N. Plstakee Lake Road, Fox Lake (In the 
Chapel on the Lake). A funeral mass was celebrated 
Saturday, April 23, 1994 at the Prince of Peace Catholic 
Church In Lake Villa at 12:00 noon. Interment was at 
Ascension Cemetery in Llbertyville. Memorials will be 
appreciated to the Lake Villa Rescue Squad, P.O. Box 
6116, Lake Villa, IL 60046 or to the Lake Villa Library, 
1001 E.Grand Avenue, Lake Villa, IL 60046. For informa- 
tion, call 587-2100. 

Marie I. Skarda 

Age 91 of Forest Park died April 8, 1994 at West 
Suburban Hospital Medical Center. Mrs. Skarda was 
born In Chicago and was a 65-year resident of Forest 
Park. She was a member of the St. Bernardlne's 
Women's Club and Friendship Club, the Forest Park 
Grandmothers Club, N.A.R.F.E. Chapter 426, Father 
Setter's Knights of Columbus Council 1278 Auxiliary and 
the Forest Park Senior Citizens' Club. 

Mrs. Skarda was the wife of the late James Sr.; moth- 
er of Elsie (the late Robert) Hoc, Ethel (Cliff) Jeemen and 
James Jr. (Dorothy); grandmother of 13 and great-grand- 
mother of 29; sister of Rudolph (Peggy) Lowell, Frances 
Macak, Elsie (Wally) Lucas and Lillian Hansen; and sis- 
ter-in-law of Agnes Green. 

Mass of Christian Burial- was celebrated April 10 at 
St Bernardlne Church, with entombment at Queen of 
Heaven Cemetery. Arrangements were handled^by 
Ahem Funeral Home. 





FINCH 

Victoria P. Finch, 77, of 

Arlington Heights. Arc 

Ahlgrlm & Sons Funeral 

Home, Lake Zurich. 

HOOK 

Gladys I. Hook, 88, of 

Grayslake, IL. Arr: The 

Strang Funeral Chapel, 

Grayslake, IL 

KAPING 

Catherine M. Kaping, 63, 

formerly of Llbertyville, 

IL. Am McMurrough 

Chapel, Llbertyville, IL 

KEPHAirr 

Dallas I. Kephart, 79, of 
Lake Villa. Arr. Rlnga 
Funeral Home, Lake Villa. 
KOEHLER 

Russell A Koehler, 72, for- 
merly of Wildwood, IL 
Arn Marsh Funeral Home. 
LARSON 

Lorenz W. Larson, 86, of 
Ingleslde, IL Arr. Strang 
Funeral Chapel, 

Grayslake, IL 
LUND 

M. James Lund, 73, of 
Gurnee, IL Arr Gumee 
Funeral Home, Gumee, IL 
MASON 

Mr. Marion W. Mason, 85, 
of Round Lake, IL, Arn 
Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Llbertyville, IL 
PETERSON 

Richard G. Peterson, 83, 
formerly of Mundeleln, 
IL Arr Kris tan Funeral 
Home, Mundeleln, IL 
RANDALL 

Helen M. Randal), 91, of 
Gurnee, IL. Arr Gumee 
Funeral Home, Gumee, IL 
RAUSCHENBERGER 
Paul D. Rauschenberger, 
22, of Mundeleln, IL Arr 
Krlstan Funeral Home, 
Mundeleln, IL 



Gi'iefitatesi 



It's good to know it's 
all taken care of .. . 



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When a death occurs, many decisions 
have to be made for a funeral and burial. 
And they're all part of a seemingly 
endless number of things that need 
attention. Rather than leaving these 
decisions to your family, you can 
take care of them ahead of time with 
Forethought funeral planning. 

Then, when the time comes, a single call 
to the funeral home should be all that's 
needed to put the process in motion. 



Call or write to us today to learn more 






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Phone: (708)587-2100 • (815)385-1001 



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Mat 6, 1994 UkcUd Newspapers OBITUARIES 




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Robert j. Groat 

j Age 28 of Fifty'Lakes, MN died April 28\ 1994 In Fifty 
Lakes; MR He was born June 18, 1965 In Waukegan, IL 
to Patrick and Anita (Howes) Groat ' 

Survivors Include his parents Patrick and Anita 
(Howes) Groat of Fifty Lakes, MN; a brother Shawn of 
Fifty Lakes, MN; also numerous aunts, uncles and 
cousins from the Lake County area also survive. 

Services were held on Sunday, May 1, 1994 In Fifty 
Lakes, MN. 





Justen's Round Lake Funeral Home 



222 North Rosedale Court 
Round Lake, Illinois 60073 

708/546-3300 

Our full-service Funeral Home offers: 
•pre-arrangement planning 
•pre-funded funerals 
•traditional services 
•contemporary services 
•customized services 




Funeral Director and Owner 

Mark L. Justen 

Serving Round Lake for over 30 yean 



George R. Justen ft Son Funeral Home 

3519 West Elm Street, McHcnry 



Justen's Wonder Lake Funeral Home 

7611 Hancock Drive, Wonder Lake 



SCHAFPBR 

Paul R. Schaffer, 69, of 
Antloch, IL, formerly of 
Libertyvllle, IL Am 
Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Libertyvllle, IL 
TYSZKO 

'Edward J. Tyszko, Sr„ 70, 
of Fox Lake, IL Arr. K.IC 
Hamsher Funeral Home, 
Fox Lake, IL 



VAUGHN 

Ronnie L Vaughn, 52, of 

Round Lake Park, IL Am 

Justen's ' Round Lake 

Funeral Home, Round 

Lake.IL 

YURS 

Paul Wesley Yurs, 42, of 

Lake Villa, IL Am Rlnga 

Funeral Home, Lake Villa. 



VANDERSPOOL 

Jennie B. Vanderspool, 89, 
of Libertyvllle, IL Arr. 
McMurrough Chapel, 
Libertyvllle, IL 




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LEGAL NOTICES 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice Is hereby given that the Grayslake Community 
Park District Board of Commissioners have changed the 
date of the Special Facilities and Finance Committee 
meetings. The committees will now meet on: 

Special Facilities - May 13, 1994 at 6:00 pm 
Finance Committee - May 11, 1994 at 6:45 p.m. 
Themeetings will be held at the Legion Building, lower 
level, 42 S. Seymour. 

The Grayslake Community Park District is subject to 
the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 
1990. Individuals with disabilities who plan to attend this 
meeting and who require certain accommodations in 
order to allow them to observe and/or participate in this 
masting, or who have questions regarding accessibility of 
the meeting or the facilities, are requested to contact Sue 
Lombardi at (708) 223-4404 promptly to allow the 
Grayslake Community Park District to make reasonable 
accommodations for those persons. 

Edwin Scarlett, Chairperson 
Sharon Desjardns, Chairperson 

. 0594A-672-GL 
May 6, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
PARKS MOWING 

The Lindenhurat Park District will receive sealed one 
year bids for contractual grass mowing, trimming ser- 
vices, and selected herbicide spraying applications), at 
park and school sites. As an alternative bid, the 
Undenhurst Park District will accept bids on one year 
contractual snowplowing for the community center only, 
Bids will be received at the Lindenhurat Park District at 
the District Community Center located at 2200 East 
Grass Lake Road, Lindenhurat, Illinois, until 4:00 P.M. 
(Chicago time) on Monday, May 16, 1994, and then at 
said Community Center publicly opened and read aloud. 
A facsimile contract with complete specifications, a 
schedule of sites, and a parks map may be obtained at 
the office of the Park District at the above address begin- 
ning at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, May 2, 1994. Bidders are 
required to supply a list of at least four (4) or more lawn 
care-related references. 

Bids documents and references list shall be sealed and 
mailed or delivered to the District Community Center and 
clearty marked "Parks Mowing Bid". The Lindenhurat 
Park District reserves the right to waive technicalities, 
reject any and all bids for any reason and to defer accep- 
tance of any proposal for a period not to exceed thirty (30) 
days after the date bids are opened. Successful bidder 
will be required to comply with all federal and state laws 
pertaining to equal opportunity. Only bids in compliance 
with all provisions of this notice and all contract specifica- 
tions will be considered. 

. ■ Thomas J. Uppert 
Executive Director and Secretary to 
Board of Park Commissioners 

Lindenhurat Park District 

2200 East Grass Lake Road 

Lindenhurat, Illinois 60046 

0594A-663-Gen 
May 6, 1994- 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
The Lake County. Farmland Assessment Review. . 
Committee has scheduled an annual public hearing on 
Lake County tax values for lands assessed under the law 
In Sections 20e, 20f 1 and 20g of Chapter 35 ILCS, Act 
205. 

Said hearing will be held at the Avon Township Center 
(Community Room), 433 East Washington Street, Round 
Lake Park, IL on May 24, 1994 at 1 1:00 am. 

For this hearing, reasonable accommodation will be 
made. for handicapped persons. This includes accommo- 
dation for the vision and hearing impaired, if a request is 
made within forty eight (48) hours of the meeting time. 
Lake County Farmland Assessment Review Committee 
0594A-664-GL/FL/LV/WN/VH/WL 
May 6, 1994 

PUBUC NOTICE 

NOTICE TO BIDDERS 

RESURFACING OF THE RIVERWOODS BIKE PATH 

VILLAGE OF RIVERWOODS, ILLINOIS 
TIME AND PLACE FOR OPENING BIDS: Sealed pro- 
posals for the improvements described below will be 
received at the offices of: 

Donald Manhard Associates, Inc. 
900 Woodlands Parkway 
Vernon Hills, Illinois 60061 
until 4:00 p.m., Friday, May 20, 1994. Ail bids will be pub- 
licly opened and read at that time, and may be acted 
upon, but in no case more than 30 days from date of bid 
opening. • 

AVAILABILITY OF PLANS : Plans, specifications, pro- 
posal and bidding documents may be obtained from the 
Consulting Engineers, Donald Manhard Associates, Inc., 
900 Woodlands Parkway, Vernon Hills, Illinois 60061, 
after 4:00 p.m. Monday, May 2, 1994. 
PREQUAUFICATION OP BIDDERS: Prior to receiving 
plans, if required by the Engineer, bidders will submit a 
resume of similar projects performed, enumerated as to 
location, type of work, approximate completion date, and 
project engineering firm together with a list of equipment 
owned by or available to them for efficient pursuance of 
the project. 

REJECTION OF BIDS : The Owner reserves the right to 
reject any or all bids of bidders and to waive all techni- 
calities. 

LOCATION OF THE WORK : The bikepath on the 
Northeasterly side of Riverwoods Road from Woodland 
Lane to Vernon Trail. , 

DESCRIPTION OF WORK : Approximately 3,200 lineal 
feet of 1-1/2" bituminous concrete surface overlay of a 5" 
bikepath. 

BID SECURITY : A 10% Bidder's Bond, Cashier's Check, 
Certified Check, or Bank Draft will be accepted as bid 
security and must accompany the bid. All proposals sub- 
mitted shall be valid for a period of 30 days. 
OWNER : The Village of Riverwoods, 300 South Portwine 
Road, Riverwoods, Illinois 60015. 
CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE : It is anticipated that work 
will begin by June 1, 1994 and be completed by July 15, 

1994. ■ 

METHOD OF PAYMENT : Cash - upon completion. 

0594A-681-Gen 
May 6, 1994 



PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE FOR BIDS • 

The Round Lake Community Unit School District #1 16 
will be accepting sealed bids for the following supplies for 
the 1994-95 school yean 

CUSTODIAL AND MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES 

The Board of Education reserves the right to waive any 
technicalities or irregularities and to reject any and all 
bids. 

Specifications may be obtained from Kurt Valentin, 
Director of Business Affairs at the Administrative Office, 
316 South Rosedale Court, Round Lake, IL 60073. 

Bids are due on or before 9:00 a.m. on May 24, 1994, 
at the above address and will be opened at that time. This 
is open to the public. 

May 3, 1994 0594A-678-Gen 

May 6, 1994 



PUBUC NOTICE 

REQUEST FOR BIDS 

VILLAGE OF FOX LAKE 

301 S. RT. 59 

FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 60020 

Sealed bids will be received in the office of the Village 

Clerk, 301 S. Rt. 59, Fox Lake, Illinois 60020 until 10:00 

am on May 25, 1994. For a 1976 International Dump 

Truck and a 1977 Ford Pick Up. 

Mark the sealed envelope "Bid for Dump Truck", "Bid 
for Pick Up" or Both. 

Bids will be open on May 25, 1994 at 10:00 am in the 
Council Chambers of the Fox Lake Village Hall. 

The right Is reserved by the Village of Fox Lake to 
reject any or all bids. 0594A-682-Gen 

May 6, 1994 



PUBUC NOTICE 
WOODLAND REGISTRATION FOR 1994-95 

Registration materials and information for the upcoming 
school year will be sent home with the students on May 9. 
The Student Information Sheet and Bus Information 
Sheets are to be returned to school by May 11. 

Registration for students new to the district wjll be held 
beginning June 13. Parents new to the district may regis- 
ter on Tuesdays from 9:00 to 11:00 A.M. and Thursdays 
from 12:30 to 2:30 P.M. 

Information will be mailed home- the first week of 
August regarding registration fee*, homeroom teacher, 
and bus assignment. / ' 

Registration fees ($60.00) are due to the school by 
August 19. 

Additional information will be sent home with the stu- 
dents during the first week of school regarding Insurance, 
payment for milk, free lunch application, parent permis- 
sion slips, school rules and other pertinent information. 

If you have any questions regarding the registration 
process, please contact your child's school office 
between the hours of 10:00 A.M. and 2:00 P.M. 
Primary West 362-3513 Intermediate 362-3570 
Primary East 816-2544 Middle School 362-3514 

0494E-655-WN/GP/GL 

April 29, 1994 

May 6, 1994 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT 
OF TRANSPORTATION 
NOTICE TO BIDDERS 
Municipality - village of 
Gumee; Rd. Dial/ 
Twnshp Warren 

Township; County - Lake; 
Section - 94-00000-02- GM 
Time and Place of 
Opening of Bide 
Sealed proposals for- the 
improvement described 
below will be received at 
the office of the Village of 
Gumee, 325 N. O'Plaine 
Road, Gumee, Illinois until 
10:30 o'clock AM., May 
26th, 1994. Proposals will 
be opened and read pub- 
licly at 10:30 o'clock A.M., 
May 26th, 1994 at the 
office of the Village of 
Gumee, 325 N. O'Plaine 
Road, Gumee, Illinois 
60031. 

Description of Work 
Name - Various Village 
Streets; Length - 52,150 
lineal feet; Location - See 
Location Maps; Proposed 
Improvement - Routing 
and sealing of approxi- 
mately 52,150 lineal feet 
of asphalt roadways. 

Bidders Instructions 

1. Plans and proposal 
forms will be available in 
the office of the 
Engineering Department, 
Village of Gumee, 325 N. 
O'Plaine Road, Gumee, 
Illinois 60031. 

2. All proposals must be 
accompanied by a propos- 
al guaranty as provided in 
Article 102.09 of the 
"Standard Specifications 
for Road and Bridge 
Construction", prepared 
by the Department of 
Transportation. 

3. The awarding authority 
reserves the right to waive 
technicalities and to reject 
any or all proposals as 
provided in Article 102.08 
of the "Standard 
Specifications for Road 
and Bridge Construction", 
prepared by the 
Department of 
Transportation. 

4. Bidders need not return 
the entire proposal when 
bids are submitted. 
Portions of the proposal 
that must be returned 
include the following: 

a. BLR 5701 • Contract 
Cover * 

b. BLR 5704 - Notice to 
Bidders 

c. BLR 5705 - Contract 
Proposal 

d. BLR 5706 - Contract 
Schedule of Prices (if 
needed) 

e. BLR 5707 - Contract 
Schedule of Prices and 
Signatures 

f. BLR 5708 - Proposal Bid 
Bond (if required) 

All proposal documents, 
including Proposal 

Guaranty Checks or 
Proposal Bid Bonds, 
should be stapled together 
to prevent loss when bids 
are processed. 

By Order of 

Village of Gumee 

(Awarding Authority) 

Norman C. Balliet 

Village Clerk 

County Engineer/County 

Superintendent of 

Highways/Municipal Clerk 

0594A-684-Gen 

May 6, 1994 



LEGALS 
CONTINUED 
ON PAGE 22 






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CLASSIFIED UlttiANtl Newspapers May 6, 1994 



CLASSIFIED 
GUIDE 





NOUCCS .••niiiioi •■ Jin. * m.ti I I" 

LOSl CI rOUDQ MM 1*1 »•■»■♦*■.•" »*4>| ji'>. *Plt*P4»PP*.*P«*t*M»t**>4 1*4 H ■■»•*■**•■*+*••*»■ 1 I J 

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Auctions.... .-,..„.,„......., — — 130 

Business Posouab ....»» -,«.... -„...135 

rilUUAJUU !.»......,., ■■■ ■■■■■■■. . L-. I »••<• I ....... . It .. ( ..|,M'F»I,..IIIIIHI I IV 

■:• : EMploVMENT 

Ifdp Wauled Fart-TIme - ...„.., ,219 ' 

Ildp Winlcd Fiil-Tlmc ,...._,..,,... .....„„.„».,.». .„,Z20 

Enjpkj^ncntAgoides........ .221 

Business Opportirittcs,.. .. ; — .- — 225 

SIIuiUogs Wmtal „„.„„.„...„ 228 

UlIIQLirC.!!.^!!! .■IJJ>M>I>JI1I.1IIJ>.M .Ml, ,|,|H|.|'l"i...lli|U 

oCixwuinsuucijQn »*,►, *.»...« m .*.-i... ( M....»M..i. .,.i.... f .jfrj'j 

MARkET CiUldE 

Antiques ...„„ 301 

Appilmces , 304 

DmXlCU I IJlLPt. . .. ...... ., ... 1 .... .......... ■■>■ . .................. ......... ... .. u ........... JvO 

310 

J14 

-...318 

320 

.....324 
.....328 

330 

334 

338 

.:...34o 

ItHlJll 

.....348 
..„350 
— 354 
..-.358 
360 

mpm'jJWb 

368 

370 



EUnir&r.rafts 

BOUCiPj HliCTijUS .,. , 

BiEtoes/Offlce Equipment „..«„ 
Electroclcs/CocripulcTS.. ...... ........ 

Finn Guide 

Flrewnxl . — . — „«.., . 

Giragc/Httmnuq>c Saks „ 

Good Things to EjL. ........ ............ 

Ilorscs & Tack. ..................... ...... 

ttousehold Goods/Purrtture.. ...... 

JeweUy ..... «.. ... 

Lxni/Gardcn «.» „,.,_..,„...„,,. 

Miscellaneous.- „....„..„....._ 

Medical EqiifVSuppUo 

Musical Instruments ..„.„..„__.. 

Pets A Supplies ».-..„.„„.„ 

RcsUuirant Equipment „...„„ 

Tools ft Machinery. „..,—„.. 

Wanted To Buy.- — 



■ iniiiiiii'iii' 







■ionics ror >is>iK+ai>«M«i«t*«>««»Mi*i 

Homes For Rent.......— 

Homes Wanted. - ......... 

Homes Builders ..... 

Condo/Town Home ... 

Mobile Homes ■«.■■«■■ ■— ■— — 

Apartments For Rent .............. 

Apartments Wanted... ....... ...... 

Apt/1 lories To Share. ...... ....... 

Rooms For Rent,.,.— ....„'...,.- 

Biildlngs .......,„..„.,...__...-.» 

Business Property For Sate-... 
Business Property For Rent... 
Lowstmenl Property-. — .„., 

Mortgage Senfos - >•> 

Farms 

Vson" Lots/Aaeage. .......... .... 

Resorts/Vacalloa Rentals. 

Out of Area Property 

kastkikTj Lots ,,.,..,,, ,,*.,..,,, 

Real Estate Wanted. .» 

Real Estates Misc. 



1............. . 






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..-504 
....508 
...510 
...514 
...518 
,...520 
....524 
....528 
...530 
...533 
.-.534 
....538 
....540 
...544 
....548 
,...560 
...564 
....568 
,...570 
-574 



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Recreational Vehicles. 

SnowrnobUe/ATV'j 
Boals/MotorS/Ele. - 

u9uM^D^ iimxi.'iii.iiii-i.-iv 

Travd/Varitkn 

Sports Equipment -..-..». 
Airplanes .—.„,-.—,„„„, 

Transportation 

Cars For Sale... 
Rental/leases ...... n ... 

CUssl c/Antlque Can... 
Service ft Parts...... .. ... 

Car Loans/Insurance.. 



4 B**a*f «»•*<■< *•'■«••* (Jl ItlHtt 




Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps „ ..- — 828 

Trucks/Traikrs.... „„„ —...„-.-.-... —-.—.- 834 

llesny Equipment .— .. . —.838 

|HOtorC^3C5 .*...., »..-,. M ItlMIHnHlHMHtlMMItWIHW HH*IMHHtSl4 

Wi|JK*J 1 U {HJT-r.Ki .....ill. ,i.n..i».j.> 1 . >i..i..i.i.... .....QiO 

; •; Service Dircctorvj 

Appliances Repair S03 

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iHlnF I'ifr I iii..ni"ii.««iiimi*iii mi'.. •HtllMINXI +■•■**«**■ i.i.hiiiiii iiiiiJUy 

Carpentry -- - . Sl2 

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EdixatJoo/liislructiOQ — ..S24 

EledricaJ . . - S27 

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Ikatint/Alr C^idruoatDg — ... S36 

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Paiattij^DecoraMng S57 

Paral^al/typmg Services -. 960 

oU0QDB£ h >H*M-**>f«i ..r- *m}j 

IWM 1 i*»«" * » * i"'""i» r.l.JXJO' 

...S69 

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ttado/TV Kpatr. 575 

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KcnoMhn 
County 




HOW TO PUCE A CUSSIFIED AD 



@ 




BY 
PHONE ... 

BY 

MAIL ... 



Call (708)223.8161 



Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 2611 
Grayslokc, IL C0030 



IN 30 S. Whitney St., 



PERSON ... Grayslake 



1 l-nri -.-i 



Ir4| BY FAX ... (708)223-8810 



Metra . 
— rMilwaukee 

RR 



<ntik t'OIIIIIV 



Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in 13 Newspapers! 

Anttoch News-Reporter • Round lake News • lake Zurich Enterprise • 

lake Villa Record • Mundelein News • Warren-Newport Press • 

Grayslake Times • Fox lake Press • Gurnee Press • lindenhurst News • 

Vernon Hills News • Wauconda leader • libertyville News 



DEADLINES 

Direct Line .....Tues. 5 pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party ..Wed. 10 am 

HOURS 

8 am - 8 pm ...Mon.-Thurs 

8:30-12 noon u.Saturday 



11 



CLASSIFIED 




Newspapers 




110 


Notices 



110 


Notices 



120 


Free 



219 



Help Wanted 
rm-iimc 



219 



HdpWinled 
Part-Time 



I 



ANTIOCH HIGH SCHOOL 
CLASS OF 1974, 20yr. Re- 
union. W*'r« Looking For 
Yoult .... BURROUGHS. 
MICHAEL; B2DAWKA, EU- 
GENE; CARROLL. CO- 
LETTE; COOPER (WYNN), 
ANITA; COWGILL, 

MICHAEL; CRANE, 

MICHAEL; FITZGERALD, 
(MARTINEZ), SHERYL; GAR- 
CIA, BENNIE; GRUGZECKI, 
(RANDALL). DEBBIE; HER- 
BERT (TAYLOR). KAREN; 
HOLM. VANCE; HORN, PAT; 
KANE, KENNETH; KO- 
PECKY. CHERYL; KOZIOL. 
CATHY; LAMKIN, JAMES; 
LEBER, MICHAEL; McGEN- 
NEY, MARY ELLEN; MEY- 
ERS, GARY; MITCHELL, RE- 
NEE; POLAND, GEORGE; 
RANDALL, MICHAEL; 

SCHNEIDER (CRAFT); SU- 
SAN; SHAFER (JONES), 
NANCY; SHAPIRO, SU- 
ZANNE; SIPERKO, RO- 
BERT; SOULAK. TERRY; 
STANFORD, KEITH; SULLI- 
VAN. (SCHMIDT), MARY; 
SWANSON. ROBERT; 

SWIM, JEFFREY; THIBI- 
DEAU, NORMAN; VAN- 
STONE, DOUGLAS; WARD, 
BRUCE; WILLIAMS. 

MICHAEL; WILLSON. 

MICHAEL T. 

ANY Information is to th« 
WtMrtMbotrta of Th«M P«o- 
p)», PImh contact Chris 
(Chiappetll) Gosh at 
(706)356-6916 or Mleea 
(Church) Meyer at 
(706)356-1225, 

PARENTS- TOUGHLOVE a 
support group for parents of 
troubled chlkiren/teens, 
. meet every Monday even- 
ing, 7pm. at Round Lake 
Area Park Dlst. room 114. 
Located on Hart Rd. and 
Rte.134, Round Lake. GET 
THE SUPPORT YOU'VE 
BEEN LOOKING FORI Or 
cal (800-926-KIDS. For Infor- 
mation. 



COUNTRY WESTERN 

BANDS WANTEDI CALL 
(708) 473-2604, or 

(708)473-9902 

SINGERS NEEDED. CON- 
TEMPORARY CHRISTIAN 
CHOIR, "TELL THE 
WORLD', NEEDS GOOD 
VOICES. Hlghschool Fresh- 
man thru Late 30's. No Pay 
BUT Lots of SATISFACTION. 
CHURCHES: BOOK- NOW 
FOR 1995 SEASONI Call lor 
Details, ask for Watt or 
Miriam, (706) 526-6306. 

A WONDERFUL FAMILY EX- 
PERIENCE- Scandinavian, 
European, South American 
Japanese high school ex- 
change students arriving Au- 
gust. Become a Host Faml- 
ty/AISE. Call Barbara 
(217)243-8453 or (1/800) SI- 
BLING. 



ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A FREE 
or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at 
NO CHARGE! (We discour- 
age any pet ads). Deadlines: 
10am Wednesdays. (708) 
223-6161, ext.140. 




115 



Lost & Found 



DID YOU FIND Somoonos 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakaland Newspapers 
Classflleds Dept., and get 
your results, FOUND ads 
are RUN FREE of Charge. 
Call (708)223-8161. 

LOST APRIL 1st. Speckled 
Beagle, east Winchester, 
Libertyville. Very Iriendty. 
Less than lyr.old. 20lbs. 
'BUTCH* REWARDII (708) 
916-7787. 

ATTENTION! REWARD! 
GREAT WHITE PYRENEES 
DOG, GIANT WHITE DOG, 
MUST BE RETURNED, 
OWNER IS CRITICALLY ILL 
CHILD. VfcJninty of Hunt Club 
RdTWadsworlh Rd., Satur- 
day, 3/5/94. Terribly mbsed. 
Substantial REWARD OF- 
FERED! Call w*h any mfor< 
mation (706) 356-3407 or 
(708)356-1114 or (312)944- 
.1333. 



ADOPTION- A FAMILY 
DREAM. One of Iho reasons 
there Is a little extra sunshine, 
laughter and happiness In the 
world is because of children. 
Because we are childless, 
there havent been too many 
sunny days. Wo know you can 
brighten our world with a child 
thai will be guided wlh love 
and tenderness, and guar- 
anteed security. Medical/Le- 
gat/Counsellng/Court ap- 
proved living expenses paid. 
Confidential, Contact ourattor- 
ney at (708)957-6835. 

ADOPTION- ABUNDANT 
LOVE, LAUGHTER, secure 
life await your newborn. 
Pease of Mind for you. Lov- 
ing lather, stay-at-home 
Mom. Expenses. John and 
Wendy. 1/800-727-9662. 

IF YOU LOVE TO COOK, 
hale to cook, or just need new 
Ideas, share a PAMPERED 
CHEF KITCHEN SHOW with 
your friends! lis fun! Call for 
details (312)761-9148. 

■BEAUTIFUL FOREVER* 
PERMANANT COSMETICS 
AND HAIR REMOVAL. 
+ElectrolyslB By SHERRY+ 
16yrs. Experience. 3rd 
NEW Lake Villa Office. Call 
(708)244-1640. 



WICKER PLUS HOME PAR- 
TIES Looking for Sales Rep- 
resentatives. Part-time. Full- 
time. Small Investment. 
Company Paid Hostess 
Plan. Average $60Vper party. 
Call Lynn (7Q8)4&7-39Q3- 

DISTRIBUTE 

BROCHURES FULL time 
for part time, 58 locals need- 
ed. Materials supplied. $410 
weekly possible, set own 
hours. (510)966-0591. 

-SPARE T1ME7- 
HELPER WANTED FOR- 
YARD WORK- ODD-JOBS. 
PRIVATE HOME, OPEN 
SCHEDULE, near train. 
(708)432-4426. 

I WILL PROVIDE STUDIO 

Apartment and full utlKles In 
EXCHANGE FOR 1/person 
to do minor chores, lawn 
maintenance, on Part-time 
basis, Permanant situation. 
Compensation available. 
References required. Lake 
Forest. (708) 362-0759. 



SUMMER HELP FOR FAMI- 
LY. Light housekeeping, 
shopping, help with meals. 
Hall-day Friday. Al day Sat- 
urday and Sunday. Must 
have references, own trans- 
portation. WRITE:. Horse, 
P.O.Box 265, Antloch, IL 
60002. 



HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed.. 

$35,000 potential. 

Details 

C*i (1) 105-9*2-1000 
Extt-4451 



HOUSEKEEPING 

Part tlme/ExpcricKC prrftrrtd 

Apply in person 

WAUKEGAN 

THRIFT LODGE 

222 Grand 

Waukegui, IL 



WORK FROM HOME 

Calling for Amvets 
6-8 hours per week 

Call between 
9:00 am & 12:00 noon 

(708)985-7467 



Earn Up To 
$15 An Hour 

CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 

Complete 

training, paid 

holidays, flexible 

Part-time hours. 

If you are 

interested, 

Call 
LynnEopfer 

(708)223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Grayslake, IL 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Plesie check your ad on the FIRST insertion date. In the 
event of an error or omission, we will be responsible for 
ONLY the FIRST Incorrect insertion. The newspaper will be 
responsible for only the portion ol the ad that is in error. 
Please notify the Classified Department In the event of an 
error within 1 week of run date. CANCELLATIONS must be 
made prior to 5 p.m. on the Tuesday before publication. 

Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to property clas- 
sify all advertising, edit or delete any objectionable wording, 
or reject any advertisement for credit or policy reasons. 

All Help Wanted advertising Is published under unified 
headings. Lakeland Newspapers does not knowingly accept 
help wanted advertising that in any way violates the Human 
RJghtaAct. 

Payment in Advance is Required for These Ads: 

•Advertisers out ol Lakeland circulation area 

•Business Opportunities •Mobile Homes •Situations Wanted 

•Debt Disclaimers •Garage and Moving Soles 

•Found and Giveaway Ads are FREE. 

' No pets wif be cons/dbred tor grVeaway. 



WE ACCEPT: 



• '/.*'.■ 



CQBpS 




Lakaland Newspapers 

Classified 

(708)223-8161 



Itu* 



■ tl II KMWMta«pn 



RECEPTIONIST/SECRETARY 

Liadenbonl Parte Diiirfct, Uodenbuni. MllooU. tnocuocw lix opening of ■ 
put-time, ycir-round poitlon ~ ReorptlociM/SccRtify, 

Umfcr the iupervlrfoo of tbe Ewcuaw Dfcee ujt. (fan employe* U <w ponribU f« 
i wide ru|e of office ftmciiau tod primvijy provide* inforcuiioo ind utUtuice 
oa proframi ud Krvicci offered to ine public, u well u clerical and rypiD|/coia- 
puier work. Generally the wortt plice U moderate tad «lfH»uifolled 

Trt* penco mint alio nave oral ability to communicate over (to selepbooe and 
Id penon with the ftoenl pa bile concemtni ibeir complatou and nuexloo* to tbc 
PirkDUtriet. 

Qjltfa: PwidootequlrettralQiDiindeiperUtiMlijaiJtMart 

aenice by irwtiof pmoot and tot wcriof telephone*, 
IiUdi refjitiatloa Information, pcovldini clerical/ 
atcretarial tupport, and coordlnatlaf fadllty/panr - 
rentals and ssiffc Alao, mining and weperiecw In 
uki of offloe equipment, compalat and ward 
proas Hint. etc. Utt indepeuta Judgment in svkwuig, 
editing and typing ronni, WB t sjCB St not, report*. ' 
memo* and other Una II needed making a a* of word 
procetiing eqdpmn* whenever poaribte. 

Oiuiificiimi; Outgoing, pletuot ptnonaUty. akllled in compoim/ 
word proomlng , k* well u offloe procedare*. 
Rt quire* knowledge, iiHl and mnttl d* vclopmtm * 
equivalent to the completion of four ytan of Ugh 
•chad witb two year* of varied derkal and public 
reliUoti* exptdenot. Regalre* ability to work 
. Indrpeodrndy and erHdeouy wim atamtlon to dtBUi. 

fUliry 8 Hflin: Avmge J«.CWftoor ■ Iflbowipet w«k(aoben*fflti) 

GttlMt Tcjj Upperi, EMcutlw Director 

LindenbtmtFitkDUalct ■ 
2200 E.Gru*Uk* Road 
Undenhnr*l,IL6004« 
(70l)1S«0li; 

QfldaBiM; Wbrnpotldonl* lilted. 

••■ Eajiil Opportanliy Empioyw 



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May 6, If 94 UklANd Newspapcrs CLASSIFIED [^, 




lldp Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Put-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



IBBBEBBBBBBBBBCI 

Lifeguard 

Port 1 1 mo lifeguard needed I 

for Graystako condo, Must j 
bo Rod Cross cert iflod. 

(708) 367-4808 1 

BBBBBBBBBBBBBBi 



Customer Service 

We ore in need of port 
time help In our customer 
service dept. Must have 
pleasant phone voice. 

€708)949-1110 



ASSEMBLERS: 

Excellent income 
to assemble products 

at home. Info 
r 1-504-646-1700 
.DEPT.IL-646. 



(COUNTER HELP 

I Part iimc positioNs avaIUWe; 

foft AhllVMMNS/EVEMiNqS. 

Apply In Person 
Please: 

J.D. DOCS 

19101 WASHINGTON 1 

GURNEE 
(708) 267-0900 



'BANQUET SERVERS 
Part time, varied hoursi 
avail. Exp. preferred.; 
Good hourly rale. 

•DISHWASHERS 
*BUSB0YS. 
The Country Squire 

Banquet Facility 

RtM. 1 20 ft 45, Orayetaika, IL 

706-223-9022 



Social S«rvic«* 

CIVIL SERVICE 

EXAMINATION 

The CMI Service Examination 
for the part-time position ol 
Mental Health Technician 
Trainee I (direct care staff) will 
be held on Friday, May 6, 
1994, at the Ann M. Klley 
Center, 1401 W. Ougdale 
Road, Waukegan, Illinois, 
promptly at 9:00 A.M. Picture 
Identification Is required. 
Please report to the 
Administration Building. For 
mom Information, please call 
the Personnel Department 
(70S) 249-0600. EOE/AA 



Part lime 

Housekeeper 

Days, Evenings 

& Weekends 

Contact 

Gail Becker 

Mount 
St Joseph 

(706) 43&-5050 



>< BOOKKEEPER 

U«i«*KrtNrkC**ric(.U«le*;r».nu»o», mkkk* I* op. »»f of t jwnimi ]rt* ra»d 
potUov . f*— .***' "wf- 

' Uaar rat apcrvaoa of tm Eatatha Vktaac. Oik easAqai m ttacaefc for pcrfinsai I 
nktf cf KxaaulH ftiadlca* jtoomIh bBU ad p«yrar m ad rml*u»iia. relax) Un ud 
fcporkv 

TUta pmoa *m aUo tmrat coatrul of ma* ud )«•--< at acaaMUs aShtks ad Inn 
iUkb, bxstk^ ad caatlaJy of DMaM Wcrntftea prnnod by tit Bnam Sevan 
Da»m*^&aiityo*warfcptaM&nrata«»«i*l*»«>«rofl»d. . -. 

7»M« as Im orri aQity la c oamufcat'owr at fetmfta* wkfc 0» at ami p*lk etaccra- 
lajtet oarUM Md aattfiMi la a* Prt Dbftfct. 

QatS J*^oii«|i»TituUaf adafcnc»e*i»o«iofcfto«ijifc*ml 

canm ud *Md framiac Md acceutlai uftwn aplkMlua. 
frrfona l»cuKpia.fiiKti<iu. fiuaciil itportt, bak Barns* nc*acUl*loa, 
bndatt accoaan, cub no**, tocaoni p«yablt (la:Boa lackafaj ptqwaj 
Btanry»«TaOt«Jclwti,ad»t!<T«)o«cowiai. 

conkto ofibur yunefMsb «Jml wffteonti U typist, battafk* 
ad aa(ttf rikc pmadoit*. CeapaiT nperluei t* eeatmy, m k 
nwkdtt of SOWnaanUl axouaUas pndJeti ad pttntnm. Abiay to 

lalTHTfl — -I'' "■" ~— — tytWW ' * *■'■—— *-"* '■"""* 

BtonU t» ak to caansak** with ad atia puMic tod Bill "tua mammy. 

«■!««*"«" AprTrtgttiaytWW-llhtMlpO •ctk(nobfatflti) 

Two Uwcrt, Eueutprt Din cici 
UadtitiwaPatDlasriet . 
TM0E.OtaiIJaRo«J 
UaduhaM.IL«»t« 
flODSSMSH 

WtniMWcaliaitd. 

Bgoil Qppataafty Empteyw - 



a 



00 YOU LOVE 
ANIMALS? 

Do you have 2 houra per week to spare? Asslal 
Animal Foundation, the area's only no-kill shelters Is 
seeking volunteers for work that Is highly rewarding 
and fun! We need men and women who: 

•Can work with cats and dogs 

•Do light repair work 

'Answer phones and other office duties 

We are located in Crystal Lake 

For more information call 

ADELE BOWEN 




J 



The 



NOW HIRING 

C##fc * to cook on Indoor charcoal grill 

KfUfK* H#lp - Cook 

DUhumthm 

■iisrorsoiu 

Part time evenings 

Must apply in person 

1*1* N. Grandwood Dr. 

Gum** 

3 $6-5200 



FRONT 
DESK CLERK 

Part Time 

Knowledge; of 
computer helpful. 

Apply in person 

Adventure Inns 

3732 Grand Ave. 
'Gurnee, IL 60031 



Sales Person 
Wanted 

Local printer seeks aggreuh/e 
soles person for commission 
sales of products, and ser- 
vices. Candidate should 
have printing knowledge and 
be self-motivated. 

Calj«ffk7M-Sf7-0$H 
after 630 p.m. 



OFFICE 
ASSISTANT 

Days/Hours Flexible 
Drivers license helpful 
but not required. 
Salary commensurate 
with experience. 

Call (708) 249-3144 

for appointment 



a DIRECTOR OF tt 

YOUTH & SENIOR 

MINISTRIES 

Mainline church seeks 
energetic and empathet- 
ic person to be responsi- 
ble for Junior High and 
Senior High youth 
groups and oversee our 
Senior Ministries. 

If interested, please all 
(708)395-1259 

for an application — 



I 



GIRLS 
WANTED 

From II, IN. and Wl 
between 7-19 to compete in 
this year's 3rd Annual 1994 
Skokie Pageants. Over 
$20,000 in prizes and 
scholarships. Call today. 

!-800-PA<jEANT 

Ext. 6642 
(l~800-724-326e> 



no 1 



i Host-Hostess ! 

JTo work part times 
joveninga Friday,; 
[Saturday, Sundays 

:No experience nec-i 
£essary. 

Servers 

5 Weekend servers: 

= needed Friday,: 

jj Saturday, Sunday.} 
§Experienced ONLY: 
■■need reply 



j Apply in Person g 

I The Silo | 

= 625 Rockland Road | 
m Lake BluIL IL 



219 



Help Wanted 

Fart-Time 



ICECREAM . 
TRUCK DRIVERS 
WANTEO ' 

! Must be 18 or older [ 

with clean driving 

record. Flexible 

schedule, Cash 

paid daily. Call 

before 2pm please. 

(70S) 973-1923 



INSURANCE 



37 year old firm rm 

inaction work m F« Lab. 

and surrounding ana. 

Car and camtn mtdtd. 

• nttpond to: 

Box 617727 

Chicago, IL 60661-7727 



Permanent 

Qualified person 

for five hours 

dairy Mon.-Fri 

Must love 
animals, animal 

experience 
helpful. Cleaning, 

some phone 
work and routine 
medication with 
dogs and cats in 
a cheerful, no hill 
facility. Call 

sh motto 

9 am - 5pm 



J 



DRIVER 

We are In need of a floral deliv- 
ery driver. Must hzve dean dri- 
ving record. 15-20 hours per 
week, ideal fob for retiree. 
Flexible hours. Wages open. 

RETTAIX 
SALES CLERK 

Experienced in retail sales pre- 
ferred but not necessary. 
Flexible hours. Able to work' 
any day of the week Monday 
thn) Saturday 

Contact 

Iibertyrille 
Florist 

(708)816-6900 



I 



220 



lidp Wanted 
Full-Ttme 



WICKER. PLUS HOME PAH- 
TIES Looking for Sales Rep- 
resentatives. Part-time. Full- 
time. Small Investment. 
Company Paid Hostess 
Plan. Average SGO^er party. 
Call Lynn (708)497-3903. 



Marriott's 

Lincolnshire 

Resort 

Full time positions available 
for Housekeepers. 

Mon., Tucs,, Thurs. 
9AM to 3PM 

and by appointment 

(708) 634-0100 Ext 6142 

equal opportunity employer 



Ccnsruclion 

FINAL PREP 
LABORER 

Lexington Homes welts in expe- 
rienced individual at Stiver Oaki 
development in Round Lake 
Beach; Thii poaition will be 
responsible for final prep prior 
to homeowner orientation. Hand 
tools are a plus. Must have valid 
driven license and good driving 
record. Please call the construc- 
tion trailer, Monday thru Friday. 
8 Ltn. to 3 p.m. at 708/265-0880 

LEXINGTON HOMES 

Equal Opportunity Eaajloycr m/f 



220 



Help Wanted 
Foil-Time 



220 



HdpWsMted 
NU-Ts-w 



220 



Help W-eted 
FaU-Tfoe 



COVENANT TRANSPORT 
FLEET IS EXPANDING $500 
stlgn-on Bonus (afler 90- 
days) Last year our top 
team earned over $05,000 * 
Starling at .27* to 2$t por 
mile wtth plus bonuses paid 
to .38* per mile 'Monthly 
mileage Bonus *6/month 
Mileage Bonus *Yoarty 
monthly Mileage Bonus 
•Paid Insurance •Motel/ Lay- 
over Pay 'Loading/ Unload- 
ing pay • Vacation, dead- 
head pay. Truck driving 
school gradualtes welcome. 
Requirement*: *age 23 
*1yr. verifiable over- the- road 
•Class A CDL wlh Hazard- 
ous Materials. 1/M0-441- 
4394. 

DRIVERS OTR: It you're look- 
ing then MIKE BROOKS 
Inc. Is one cal you can! af- 
ford not to make. We're *A 
Place to. Cal Home' in 'Knox- 
vile, 1A. Call recruiter today 
for details: We're number 
one-S00-€22-«€01. New 
Pay Package for Company 
Drivers and Owner Opera- 
tors. (The Clear Choice). Call. 
Today. 

DRIVERS- GET HOME week- 
ly with Rising Start OTR 
Short haul opportunities, no 
•slip seating, home weekly. 
(shorthaul), . excellent 

pay/beneltts. BURLINGTON 
MOTOR CARRIERS. 1-800- 
JOIN-BMC. EOE. 

DRIVERS- COME FOR THE 
MONEY, STAY FOR THE 
STABILITY. J.B.HUNTone of 
America's Largest and most 
successful transportation 
companies, pays its drivers 
some of the best salaries In 
the business. Inexperienced 
drivers call 1/800-845-2197, 
Experienced drivers 1/800- 
368-8538. J.B.HUNT The 
Best Run (or the Money, 
EOE .Subject to Drug Screen. 



DRIVERS- OTR $1,000 
SIGN ON BONUS. Guar- 
anteed get home 6-10 days. 
Weekly pay, tyr. experience. 
Class A CDL, with Hazmat 
endorsement. Optional to 
driver; 1. Loaning or unload- 
ing 2. Running loads East of 
IB1 a.Patd on actual mites. 
PASCHALL TRUCK LINES, 
INC. PTL 1)00-848-0405, 5A. 

DRIVERS: TOP OPPORTU- 
NITIES FOR owner operators 

In 3- 1 toe Is; Relocation Servic- 
es. Blanketwrap and- High 
Value Products. Outstanding 
' tractor purchase program 
available. Tuition-free train- 
ing for inexperienced drivers. 
NoflhAmerfcan Van Unas 
800O46-2147. Dept. EL6). 

FRIENDLY HOME PARTIES, 
now has opensngs for dem- 
onstrators. No cash Invest- 
ment. Part-time hours with 
full lime pay. Two catalogs. 
- over 700 lama, cat 1-80O- 
466-4675. 



OWNER OPERATORS! We 
Offer Top Pay, Weekly Set- 
tlements. 4 to 6 day runs, 
Dedcated Service, , Back- 
hauls and Insurance Packag- 
es. Interested? Contact 
Carol BennMI at 

800/373-3142. 



Restaurant 

RESTAURANT 

Honwmakars, 8tudanti, Sami 
Rallraaa m, Othan. No 
Expectance Naoaasaryl Earn that 
•xtra Ineome, flax achedud 
super "Work anvltonmant. I 
Habta KafaAol. Apply to: Burger 
King, 233 Northwest 6 Hay ». 
708-381-1610. E.O.E.MTF 



DATA ENTRY 
OPERATORS 

NEEDED 
IMMEDIATELY 

Tansportation 
necessary, long term 
temporary positions with 
possibility of permanent 

employment 

REMEDY 

STAFFING 

(708)470-0970 



.V 



ADJUSTMENTS 
ANALYST 

M*an* (hd^JMsfiM,, inc., ft MMarijj rmv 

\hmm wd CHiiiH o* mmicd md- 

H [**•, lAn *n irTtrT>*<l»s* otpportXaffb 

§*n A^jt»T-n»i kvtfti to aniji* p»y 

■ accoflfcny OuaM carcMMM Ml _ 

I h»« an ae Jantphana iaww and | 

j arid Ml «*a«al«n a* Mi m tw I 

j ab^bprkirs »anjBaa i da4am | 

Prior A/P or AVti topwwic* if pi &V' •C!. h 

" or 9. 



1 



s 
i 



rOa* rnrMrXate 00fWCWlaKsrt,€U 

ai J il . 

cor-WinD* it. 



SUMMER WOM $1t^S 

lnt'1 Corp. level 1 openings 

Interview now start 
befonVafter finals. 

C708) 244-3003 



i 



MEDUNE 
INDUSTRIES, INC. | 



Envjnwnant DapL AA 
One a t sdsia Plaaa 

MkrxMktx IL60OSM4M 

rmjMt-aost 

EOE rnfl^cW 



Northwest 
Suburb 

Workshop for 
Developmental 
Disabled people 
needs workers. 

Phone 
MT. ST. 
JOSEPH 
438-5050 

askfor 

Georgia or 

Nadine 



L 



RECEPTIONIST 

Med. Bkgmd. a Plus! 3 positions available. 



ersonneL 




Manulacturtng 

BOBST CUTTING 
PRESSPEOPLE 

FlohJ Contalnar Corrparry, a lead 
Ing Inoepeodartt manutacturaf of 
lolblng cartons hat an excellent 
opportunity available for a BOBST 
Cutting Operator. Most have previ- 
ous tneat-fed BOBST experience; 
folding carton background pre- 
ferred. Additional potential oppor- 
tunity lor press operators with high 
mechanical sMIls for our make- 
ready area. 

Wo orfer a competitive salary. 
uniquo 3 1/2 day work week and 
full company benefits Including 
medical, denial 401K and pen- 
sion. II you are looking for a 
regarding and chalenglng fob with 
a successful company, pbase call 
70O-05C-3223 Of come » the per 
svnnel olfico between 830am and 
1230cjti Ti'csday, Wednesday or 
Thursday. 

Held Container Company 

1500 Nicholas Blvd. 

Elk Grove Village, IL 60007 

Equal rjppofnjnlty Errptoyef rrvl 



FINANCE/MANAGEMENT 
CAREERS 

FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

NO EXPERIENCE OR 

COLLEGE DEGREE REQUIRED 

Are you looking for a career which will satisfy your 
needs and goals? We are Interested in career-minded, 
ambitious people to train for management positions In 
our branch offices. MFC's branch manager training pro- 
gram offers security, involvement with people, chal- 
lenge, and opportunity for advancemenL Outstanding 
employee benefits. Bilingual a plus. 

MERCURY FINANCE COMPANY 

426 S. Greenbay Road 
Waukegan. IL 60085 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

Apply in person only! 



How To 



Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Q: I am an upcoming '94 college graduate and I was offered 
a job with a corporation to begin on June 1st The corpora- 
tion is known to be quite profile and image conscious. As 
usual I like to wear my hair short cropped for the summer 
because I am active in outdoor sports and activities. Yes, in 
the past my haircuts for summer have been a bit trendy, even 
two toned, but a friend has told me to refrain from anything 
too drastic or out of the ordinary. What's the big deal? Is this 
an issue I should be concerned with? And personally, what 
difference does il make in the way I look just as long as I can 
get the job done? K.P. - Libertyville. 

A: Dear K.P. H-e-l-l-o?!7! Your friend may be trying to tell 
you that if the company is known for profile and image there 
is a chance that they are very conservative. In which case if 
the corporation hired what they believed to be a conservative 
well groomed and this individual shows up to first day train- 
ing sporting a two-toned mohawk, well ~ it leaves room for 
question in their minds from the beginning as to the type of 
person they met vs. what is now standing before them. This 
is not to say you shouldn't get a haircut ». just refrain, as 
your friend said, from doing anything drastic that will cause 
unnecessary attention to yourself. It goes back to the old say- 
ing that "you never get a second chance to make a tint 
impression". As for your comment about the way you look 
not having anything to do with whether or not you can do the 
job ... that is correct, however, no company would admit to 
getting rid of an employee because they don't like the way 
they look, but keep in mind an employer can find any one of 
a dozen reasons for termination. In the meantime, consider 
yourself very fortunate to be walking away from college with 
a degree in hand and the key to your future in the other. My 
suggestion is to trim your hair before you start „ get a feel 
for the inside and starting a new career instead of focusing on 
your outdoor extracurricular activities. As you leave the 
doors of your alma mater remember this is the real world you 
are about to venture into. Conformist ... non-conformist ~ a 
smart individual knows the meaning of both! 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional 
and President of Superior Personnel in Gurnee. 
Letters can be sent to Nancy at 5101 Washington St., 
Gurnee, IL 60031. 



It 



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CLASSIFIED UkeUNcI Newspapers. Max 6, 1994 




220 



Help Wanted 

Full-time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-Timc 



220 



220 



Help Wanted 

. Full-Time 



JQBHBBBBBBBOBE3S9 

I DRIVERS g 



K Local delivery, Small car 
(j & Insuranco necessary, r 
Apply at H 

5 402 N. Seymour ] 
(j Mundefein 

BBBBBflagysyyaaBa 



BOOKKEEPER 

Dulles to Include A/P, A/R 
& misc. on IBM AS400 
Full or Part lime position 
Excellent pay with com- 
plete benefits. 

Apply In ptraon 

WAUKEGAN TIRE 

3444 Washington St. 

Waukogin, IL 
Aak for Mr. Narhalm 



ATTENTION 
HOMEMAKERS 

Turn your love of cook- 
ing Into a prolltablo busi- 
ness! Show quality, afford- 
able kitchen tools through 
an exciting new party plant 
Bring the Pampered Chef, 
The KHchon Store That 
Comes To Your Door" to 
your area. No deliveries. 

Call 
(312)761-9148 



BURGER 

KING 




HELP WANTED 

Full and Part time 
Days & Evenings 
Flexible Hours 
• -Call Now- 

(708) 395-8806 



DIRECT 
CARE 

Staff needed to work tn 
specialized program for 
adolescents w/autfsm. 2 
yrs. working wAhe devel- 
opmental^ disabled and 
prior behavior mgmt. 
exper. required. College 
degree preferred. Pay 
negotiable depending 
upon educat'n and 
exper. Send resume to: 
BLARE HOUSE, Inc., 

14010 Lake Park, Park 
City, IL 60085. EOE No 
phone calls. 



GRAYSLAKE FIRE 
PROTECTION 

DISTRICT 

FIREFIGHTER/ 

PARAMEDIC 

Th4 QraysJeke fir* Protection District 
will b» osndieting an •xtrrirttHon to 
estebiiah an efigfblity Hit for he por- 
tion ol rlrttghUrrPtraffltdc 
At time of application ill earxSdales 
mutt: 

Be a U.S. Citizen 
■ Be of good moral character 

Be in good physical condt'on 

Pwi virion requirement* 

Have Noh school tSptomt or 
equivalent 

Possess Valid Hinois EMT A or 
EMTPCertlcetien 

Possess nitnol* RreJghis r II 
Corffcation 
All eppJiearta »rl be required to ne> 
niito: 

A mandatory orientas'on Mnlon 

A written examination 

a. physical e(>iiry test 

Anofallnssntew 

An exiensJva beefcgrouTd ohaott 

A medteal exemineflon 
BUOoaeaM candidates iM serve * 
probationary period. Owing tut Km* 
candd*)** mutt become a osrirted 
p* Miwk and eetabSeh riaidencys* 
directed by me Qrayetske Fir* 



Department RUee A RegiJaf one 
Appioafone an available to 
picked IB In pa won beginning at April 
21, IWt at (he Qrayelake Fin 



St, 

COffr 



DapartmanU 110 Hasfe 
Qrayriato, IL MOM. Prooari 
plated eppeoalona muat bt received 
by tat Qrayalak* Rr* DaparkTMot no 

US* r sHan May 1 J, 1 9M at 4:00 p.m. 
Equal Opportjrtty Employer 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tlnte 



CHEPS HELPER 

Briftol Oaks Country Club U 
in need of a Chef'i Helper. 
Weekends a must. 

Apply tn Person 
16801 . 75th St. 

Bristol, WI 
(414) 857-2302 



**************** 

IBLUE JEAN: 
| JOBS | 

i 815-455-1 650 * 

**************** 



McDonalds 

Now hiring ALL 
8HIFT8 for McDonalds 
on Lewis Ave. * in 
Waukegan. Apply In 
person. Ask for Ray. 

1939 N. Lewis Ave. 
Waukegan, IL 

E.O.E. 



Harlem Furniture 
is growing! 

Wo need lull lima help In 
our Vornon Hills store 
offices. Wo olfor woekday 
hours, excellent salary & 
benefits Inc. dental. II you 
have cashier or gen. oil Ice 
exp. and want to be part 
of our success. 

Call (708) 617-4700 
•xt. 268 



CUSTOMER 

SERVICE 
SUPERVISOR 

Medina Industries, Inc., * lasting 
manufacturer and distributor ol mtto- 
leal supplies, offers this Immedete 
opportunity lor a Customer Service 
Suparvitor. This effeeBvaVlsam- 
buildsi/leader will have ptevious 
supervisor experience: Familiarity 
wih Windows & Usjs 1-2-3 desired. 
A 8.S. in Business is preferred. For 
immediate consideration, send 
resume In confidence to: 
MEDLINE 

INDUSTRIES, INC. 

Fjiptoyment DecrL CS 
One MedHne Place • 
Mundefein, It 60060-4486 
EOE mrtd/V 



HOUSEKEEPING 

Full & part time. Must be 
able to work weekends & 
holidays. Apply in person: 

ADVENTURE 



L 



3732 Grand Ave. 
Guinea 



Partylite™ 

Candles are the hottest deco- 
rating accessories of the 90's. 
lUmmy scents - no calories 
Restraining Noinunlory 
Nodeltvery Nocathlnvalment 
No risk Hi jh rtlumi 

Part or Full Time 

(708) 587-7914 Annette 
(815)675-6340 Jan 




TRABJUO 
DE FABRICA 

Nesecltamos 75 horn- 
bres y mujerea para tra- 
bajar en el area de 
Mundelein, Ubertyvllle y 
Wheeling tenemoa 

primero segundo y terser 
turno dfsponlble para 
ensamblar, empacar y 
Q.C. Inspectors. Uame 
a America's TempCorps 
ai 549-1595 antra 8:30 
am - 4:30 pm. 



MECHANICAL 
ASSEMBLER 

30 oponlnas IrrWhoolIng, 
Largo Into mat lonal 
company. Ovortlme 
required. Must have 
own transportation. 

America's 
Temp Corp. 

(708)549-1595 



NECHANIC 

LIGHT . 
MECHANICAL 

Experience preferred 

Vafid drivers 

(cense a must 

Hcji school cradu^te 

Please call between 
8:30 am - 5:30 pm 

(jot)st7-om 



STANLEY 

SMITH 
SECURITY 

Is hiring full & port rime 

SECURITY OFFICERS 

for a large manufacturing 

faclflty In Spring Grove, 

All shifts available. 

CALL 

1-800-942-9394 



i 



THE MAIDS 

America's Maid Service 

NOW HIRING 

Earn $5 to $6/hour 

No •xp«rfev)c« necenary 
'Incentives & Bonuses 
*30 to 40 hrs. per week 
*No nights 

•Paid vacatloa holidays 
'Advancement 

opportunities 
'Uniforms 
'Paid Training 
'Auto provided 

Coll (708) 249-3144 



Positive Focus 

WE EMPHASIZE PROGRESS 
Rolling Hills Hospital, a 40- 
bed private Psychiatric Aar- 
pital located in Ada, 
Oklahoma with satellite 
clinics in Ada, Ardmore + 
Durant has an immediate 
opening for a: 

Psychiatrist 

BOARD ELIGIBLE OR 
BOARD CERTIFIED 

Interested applicants should 
call Shcrri Owen-Calaway, 
Executive Director at (405) 
436*3600 or 1-800-522-9505 
Equtl Opportunity Employer 

ROLLING M HELLS 



A Prtintt Piychixric Hoftiai 



Laborer 

The Village of Round Lake 
Beach's Public Works 
Department is now seeking a 
qualified individual for the 
position of Laborer. The hourly 
rate for this full-time position is 
SS.OO/hour. Individuals inter- 
ested in this position must pos- 
sess a current CDL License and 
should apply in person at the 
Round Lake Beach Village Hall, 
224 W. Clarendon Avenue. 




I Hastings Lake Camps | 
NOW HHMG 

sAsnbhnt Pood Service Manager $8*$10/rodr 
JCooks $7-$8/hour 

»Cooks Assistant $5/hour 

« "NO LATE EVENINGS 

§8 *PA1D VACATION 

•PAID RETIREMENT 

•MEALS PROVIDED 

•UNIFORMS PROVIDED 

•PLEASANT WORKING CONDITIONS 
M/F E.O.E. 

708-356-4001 



TYPESETTER/PASTEUP ARTIST 

Local Printing Firm looking for a FULLTIME person 
with Pagemaker capabilities to work days. 
Duties would Include heavy computer entry and 
fradltional pasteup. Benefit package available. 
Fill out application at BCT: 1550 W. Grand Ave. 
Suite C. Waukegan from 8:30-5:30. 



Sandy McKie & Sons 

Is looking for a 
time Porter. 



^si^89^^ § Stop in & fill out 

an application at 



FINDERS™, a contractor - service referral system has a ground floor 

opportunity for good salesperson. 

If you enjoy selling by super serving your clients... 

If you have lots of contracts in Lake & McHenry counties... 

If you don't mid working long & hard for a big reward... 

If you are organized, well dressed, have a good car, and can make 

both in person presentations and do phone work, call us right now. 

"We're like 1-800-DOCTORS" For contractors and services, 

FINDERS 

Based in Grayslake 

(708) 548-FIND (3463) or Fax Resum6 548-3492 

Call 8 AM to 6 PM (Mon.-Fri.) 

Ask for Mr. Lcafblad 

GWHEE MILLS 

The world's largest outlet mall is now hiring 
friendly people for the following positions: 

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE - 

People needed to work in our information 
booths. Individuals will be assisting our cus- 
tomers with any questions, selling mall gift cer- 
tificates and shopping bags. Must have a posi- 
tive attitude. Evening and weekend hours avail- 
able. 

TOUR GREETERS • Individuals needed to 
greet our motor coach tour groups and conduct 
follow up correspondence with customers. We 
are looking for people who are friendly and 
outgoing. Flexible day hours and some week- 
ends available. 

For consideration please apply in person at the 
Information booths locatea at entrance A & E. 



Fox Lake, 



587-6471 



COSMETIQUE BEAUTY CLUB 
WANTS YOU 

To Turn Your Evenings and 
Saturdays Into Extra Income! 

DO YOU ENJOY talking with people? Are you look- 
ing for a work schedule flexible enough to meet your 
lifestyle needs? 

THEN COME to our beautiful, smoke-free VERNON 
HILLS headquarters, where you'll receive top, paid 
training from our friendly staff of professionais. You'll 
learn to feel confident and effective making simple ser-. 
vice calls offering attractive renewal options to our for- 
mer members. 

BEGIN BY working at least 1 6 hours each week and 
you'll earn S7 to $9 hourly PLUS generous commis- 
sions. 

TO FIND OUT more about your opportunities with 
us, talk with Yvonne In our Human Resources Dept at 
708-913-9099 Monday thru Thursday 8am to 4pm. 
fe.o.e.) 

CO&VIETiSUE' 



FLOOR CARE 

Health care facility In 
Mcllcnry County has a 
full-time position avail- 
able. Must be responsible 
and dependable. 

Will train 

Call 

(815) 344-2600 




P0NDER0SA 



NOW HIRING 

Cow/ 

BOTITTWOMtEMg 

Pay comrnonjurafo with 

experience. Nuraarou s 

othor employee, benottU. 

PUom Apply In Ptnon 

2915 Belvidere Rd 



ifc 



Waukegan, IL 



A 



plsitlcs , 

INSPECTOR/ 
PACKERS 

Inspection and packing of 
plajllc, pans. Basic math 
skills and attention to detail. 
2nd/3fd shifts. 

QUAUTY CONTROL 
INSPECTOR 

Excellent math, documenta- 
tion and communication 
skills needed In addition to 
experience with blueprints 
and gauglnetnipectlon 
instruments. 2nd shift 
Experience preferred, 

For consideration 

please apply In person, 

9am • 4pm at 

Automated MouM 
biAittritSt Inc. 

Human Resources 

5801 AMI Dr. 

Richmond, IL 60071 

(815) 678-4581 

EOE WT/HrV 



i.i.iiiiiiii.miiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Developmental 

Trainer 

Full time, entry level, 
willing to train indi- 
viduals with 
Developmental dis- 
abilities, in skills, 
oral hygiene,- domes- 
tic, pre-work and 
community. 

Contact 
Gail Becker 

(708) 438-5050 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii 



I 



AUTO SALES 
WITH TOP FORD TEAM 

Join the Unbeatable new car sales team that's made 
doing business with friends a 54 year tradition. 
Experience or bilingual Spanish is a plus, but we'll train 
a dedicated personality. Extensive benefits package 
includes Demo, Commission, Bonus Perks, Salary, 
Pension Plan & Health Insurance Program. Apply in 
person. 

Atk For Dennis Piccone or Wally Davis 

REED RANDLE FORD 

3100 Grand Avenue , Waukegan, IL 60085 



ADTBRTlSDsTG SALES 

Lakeland Newspapers, Lake County's largest weekly 
newspaper group, is seeking an Advertising Account 
Executive. The canoidato will be responsible for field 
sales calls, developing a key area in Lake County 
and must possess excellent skills in Interpersonal 
communication, creativity and personal responsibility. 
The candidate must also be self motivated and able 
to work with minimal amount of supervision, enjoy 
variety and be able to hancfe multiple tasks. An auto- 
mobile is necessary (gas compensation will be 
made.) If you are professional, energetic and pos- 
sess al of the above characteristics we are interest- 
ed bt talking to you. A canoadate should have previ- 
ous sales experience. Please send resume or call: 

Jill DePasquale 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708)223-8161 



OFFICE TEAM 



A Division of Robert Halt Internationa! Inc. 

OFFICETEAM... 

has formed strategic alliances with WordPerfect and Professional 
Secretaries Iniernailonal (psi). 

This Is why our phones are ringing off the hook for qualified 
candidates with the following skills: 

•Admin. Asst. 
•Receptionist 
•Customer Service 
•Data Entry 

•General Office 

Join the team and be heads above (he resii WordPerfect and PSI 
know we are, come In and see for yourselfl Refer a friend and we'll 
pay you (251 

OFFICETaEAM... 

Division of Robert Half Int'l 

One Northbrook PI. #370 

Northbrook, IL 60062 

(708) 480-2073 Fax: 480-1871 

EEOC/No Feet 

For other opportunities call: 

Hoffmann Estates: (708) 885-6228 

Oakbrook: (708) 261-3086 




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220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



WANTED: 

CARPENTERS 

No experience neceeaary, 
: but preferred 

(708) 289-0711 

Att for Shawn 



|220 


Help Wanted 
FuQ-Tfane 


° BARBER mim" 1 

. Barber Styilet wanted to 
work In Mundeleln shop. 

(708)566^057 
evenings n 



^ UNOENHURST EARLY " 

CHIDHOODCEHTER 
Is interviewing ton 

CHILD 

DEVELOPMENT 

TEACHER 

Education & experience 
necessary. 

For mora info Call 

k 708-356-2288 



in I 

4 





220 


Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




•sum oniroi 

•UNTM 
(711) S1MIM 





~- ■"> ' 



ELECTRONICS 

I BENCH TECHS 

Test, trouble-shoot E/M 
bio-rned equip, chip 
component level. 

Extensive documenta- 
tion skills required, 

■ PRODUCTION 
TECHS 

Mln ASEET or 2 yrs elec- 
tronics work exp. 

CALL/SEND RESUME 
708-255-8444 

KAY AND ASSOC 

3820 N. Ventura Dr. 

Aitintlon Ms, IL 60004-7951 

EOE 



I 



Immediate 
Opening for 
Dietary Abb 

For Full Time. 

If Interested 
. contact 
Val Johnson 

(708) 438-5050 

MOUNT 
ST. JOSEPH'S 

Lain Zurich 



•FOOD 
PRODUCTION 

COME WORK In THE 
LAMBS COUNTRY STORE 
In the production area where 
we make our own fame and 
faRlea. 

MUST BE familiar with 
food production, have good 
organizational sMIs and fo(- 
taw-lhrough. Wll be working 
wtth and supervising develop- 
menially disabled aduts, 

HOURS: Monday thru 
Friday 9am to 5pm; some 
waekands may be required. 

APPLY In person: THE 
LAMBS FARM, Founders 
Buiktng. Jet. 1-94 & Rt. 170, 
Ubertyvlls, IL 60048 (e.oe.) 



PUNCH PRESS 

Sot-up and Operate 

MHS Automation is seeking 
an experienced Individual to 
set up progressive, com- 
pound, des on a variety of 
types and sizes of presses. 

5+ years of experience with 
auto & hydraulic presses up 
to 65 tons la required. We 
otter competitive wages and 
benefits. For Immediate con- 
sideration, apply In person 
from aam-5pm at; 

MHS AUTOMATION 

165S N. Woods Street 
Round Lake Beach 

an equal opportunity employer 




Madieal . 

BOARD ELIGIBLE/ 

BOARD CERTIFIED 

PSYCHIATRISTS 

Imrned cceranga for Board EtgbW 
Boird CsrWiad PeycNabiati at 
Northeast Florida State HaepttaL 
Florida He. raq'd Comprehenaive 
bam pkg incf do malpractice iraur., 
rt tii a n wrt. hailn & Ma Irmur. Koaptai 
loe'd X mm. from Jaetaorvfla & SO 
mK from QaJnaavDa. Salary naoo. 
Contact Sandra T. McDonald, 
Medical SUA Coordinator. 

(904)259-6211 exl 1118 



•PHYSICIAN* 

The Drake WUm t tt um Oi teaki 8E.CC 
Ptiytfdwi for P/T'eeMen. Fam. 
Pree fca fhana l UtJJH& g* eafciaaU 

Sajdjant pop. of aVjOw. Wont w^nHtMnrm 
tMffl Of mgtfm N P. *> 4 Svypo rijFW . 
Cofnp' MLAtntL BfVn fMUTM HrttWVTIOfM 

to: Um HaronW. UNNEfBrTY PEfl 
SONMEL SERVICES, Aukun Univ.. AL 
MM*. *a*m U*f. bM«ajMa|ra Mm 

— - . rt . — ■ ii i . » - .. 



Medical 

PHYSICAL/ 

OCCUPATIONAL 

THERAPY 

Are you tied of covering 3 or 4 taort- 
(ties every week? Do you prefer the 
*tabi«y of working from 1 fadflty 
enabling yog to daraiop trioaa 
import* rt reatfionehfcia while prevM- 
Ing oonelatenl quaaty of oare? It eo, I 
would ike to tak to you. The future 
of rehebUatne therapy le In long 
term care eJdled nursing faciWes. 
Rmacle Rehatfttatbn ie trw InduB- 
t/ys leader fai provtfng both the 
highest queiry of cere to pelienla I a 
superior work environment dedteal. 
ad to the career advancement of U 
therapMa. Enjoy a highly competi- 
tive aaLAene pkg sawel aa the 
oppty la workwrth a etrong muttJ-dw- 
apan*ry Warn of therapists providing 
the beat potable care. Various 
career opportunUee fee'd. through- 
out the Midwest For more Into, cal 
JlmCavnar i-*oo-6Sfr-772fl. 



CNA'S 

Skiliedflntermedate 
care facility located 
in Long Grove has 

need of CNA's 
Good Benefits/Salary 

Call Suzy M-F 

8:30 a.m. • 5:00 p.m. 

(708)438-8275 



MeScel 

MEDICAL RECORDS 
DIRECTOR 

War Memorial HotplaJ, lotfd In 
Eatterry Upper Panlntula of 
Michigan, hai an axoalL oppty for 
an innovative. Individual aa 
Medical Records Director. We are 
■ JCAHO eccradlled facility that la 
committed to Total Quality 
Management Thia person will be 
responsible . for aupervttlng all 
medical recorda ectivitlei. The 
candidate muat be farriiar with 
JCAHO standards, ax per In coding 
& utilization review 1 posaets the 
ablty to work wall Wmedical atafl 
a other hospital depti. The select- 
ed person wll be RRAcarURed w/3 
yrs managerial exper. We otter e 
comp, aaiyoomplete bens, pkg 
incrdg tuition reimbursement For 
more Information call Betty 
Daniels, Human Resources 
Admfnblration at (800) 421-5115 
or sand rasume So: Human 
Resources Dapt. WAR ME MORI 
AL HOSPITAL, 500 Oi bom Blvd., 
Seutl Sie. Marie, M 497B3. 



■BBBBEEBCBBei 

gOCCLPATIOMLg 

I Therapist | 

aajFull or part time tog 
Bwork with develop-B 
E mentally disabled E 
H women at Mount St. H 
g Joseph. ICF/DD. g 

g Contact g 

g Sister Arlene g 

g Mount g 
g$T. Joseph g 

B (708) 438-5050 B 
eg Lake Zurich a»j 



"DAY NURSING- 
SUPERVISORS 

7:00 am * 3:00 pm 
3:00 pm- 11:00 pm 

Our intermediate skilled 
facility located in Long 
Grove is seeking energetic 
R.N."j with sincere inter- 
ests in Geriatric Nursing. 
Supervisory skills pre- 
f erred Good benefits A 
competitive salary. 

-For info call . 

Suzy at 

(708) 438-8275 

between 8:30-5:00 pm 
■ Monday - Friday | 



iff 



NURSING 



Growing family practice & 
multi- specialty clinic leelu: 

R.N. 

Full-Time 

Previous ER, turoical or 
office experience desired. 

MEDICAL ASST. 

Pwl-llme 

18 hour* per week. Previoai office 
or hofpitrl e^erimce required. 

Flexible i«ouri and pleasant 

work environment. Call Peg 

Gorman, RH. (70S) 578-3438 

or Mad resume to: 

. Personnel Dept 

FUHS/Chicago 

Medical School 

3333 Green Bay Road 

North Chicago, IL 60064-3095 

equal oppt employer m/tWv 






0$ 
I 1 



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YOU ALWAYS HIT 
THE MASK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



CARE CENTRE OF WAUCONDA 

Join a team nf caring professionals! 

Pride in what you do is a key to being part of 

our staff. The difference shows in work 

that's done with pride. 

Nursing: Positions open: 

RNorLPNfuUtime3-ll 
CNA full and part time 

7-3 & 3-11 
Activity Director: 

Full time, immediate 

For more information please call 

(708) 526-5551 



MOUNT SAINT JOSEPH 




DIRECT 
CARE 

NIGHT 
SHIFT 



THE RESIDENT IS 

AT THE HEART OF 

ALL WE DO! 



Immediate 
openings 

for 

CNA 

Full or 

Part Time 

Willing 

to train 

for positions. 

FUms4 tmtUet Gmtt Itcfctr 

(708)438-5050 



RN/LPN 

Immediate 

openings. Nights 

9pm • 5:30am. 

Contact 
Candy Sabay 




Medical 

HIALTHCARG 
OPPORTUNITIES! 

Abound in Sunny South Carollnal 

The Regional Medical Center ol 
Orangeburg A Calhoun Counties, a 
280 bed acute care regional referral 
center. MOating a aade range ol ser- 
vices to more than 176,000 people In 
5 oowlriet. Our (aeiaty, located in 
Orangeburg, SC la 70 ml NW ot 
Charleston, SC and 40 ml SE of the 
capital cSy of Columbia, SC We seek 
qualified canrjdates for the totoerfng: 
'Vlco President, 

Nursing SoxvIcm 
*E.R. Nurao Practitioner 
•Critical Cars Nursaa 
'Phyaleal Tharaplata 

ftAaalatanta 
TRMC offers compete salaries 
benefit opporluntoas. Sand resume 
orcsll1-M3-&U-2270. 
Ta/mBehtes, 

De^ctorot Employee Rotations 
Tha Regional HrWdica! 

Ctntor of Orangeburg A 
Calhoun Countian 

3000 St. Matthews Rd. 
Orangeburg, SC 29115 

E.O.E. Mr 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



MSmiURS/ 



15 Immedurto openings. 

Lsrgo Lake Zurich Company, 

Opportunity lor Tamp-Hlra 

730 AM -330 PM 

Monday thru Friday 

8hrft$7J57nour to start. 

Jlllfltrtt'sflJfr'&UV 

(708)549-1595 




Now Hiring 
Motrvatad People For 

ALL SHIFTS 

Stop In lo HI out application 

20 S. Rt. 12 

Fox Lake, IL 

708-587-1414 



MECHANIC 

Fleet Shop looking for 
skilled individual to per- 
form major and minor 
repairs on tractors and 
(jailers. Must have work- 
ing knowledge of Class 8 
Trucks and Refrigeration 
Units. Wages to match 
your ability. 

Apply at: 

Birchwood 
Transport, Inc. 

3111 152nd Avenue 

Kenosha, WI 

between 8 am and 4:30 pm 

or call Ron 

@ 800-541-1684 

' equal opportunity employer 




EXPERIENCE 
NECESSARY. 

The Air Force 
oilers training in 
more than 150 - 
technical special- 
ties with: — 

• excellent pay 

• 30 days vaca- 
tion with pay 
per year 

■ complete medi- 
cal & dental care 

• opportunities to . 
advance 

Get the experience. 
Call 

ASFOlCEOmmHS 

TOLL FREE 
1-800423-USAF 





************ 



**GURNEEt* 

* NOW * 

* HIRING * 

* * 

* • 50 Positions * 

* * Days/Nights * 

**Full/Part"nme * 

* * 

2 * Weekends only * 

* available lit 

J school* out * 

J Applyln J 

* person * 

* 5300 Grand Ave. * 
2 Gumee * 

J EOE WF £ 

************ 



220 



Help 1 

Fall-Time 



220 



Help Wailed 
tWItae 



Shipping/ 
RacaMng Cletk 

Duo to advancement, 
Liberty Coach, a builder 
of custom coachea, has a 
full time opening for an 
individual experienced 
in handling and receiv 
ing of UPS and other 
shipments. Must be reli- 
able, organized and 
detail minded. 1400 
Morrow Ave., North 
Chicago. 

raeevaVMoo 



ACTIVITY 
ASSISTANT 

Our activity depart- 
ment has a Full Time 
position available for 
an Activity Assistant In 
our long-term Health 
Care facility located In 
Long Grove. Ability to 
work with the elderly 
preferred. 

Call Marilyn 
438-8275 

Mon.-Fri. 
10:00 am - 5:00 pm 



! 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

Learn and Eaml WI ti.-Jn toJ5Q$7£Mu+ tonaflta. Upbeat enviroa 



perior JTcrsonnel 



Hair Stylists 

Experienced with or without folowing. Pay, benefits I 
among me best. Salary and commissions. Major mod-] 
leal and dentat life Insurance; paid holidays; continuing j 
\ education; profit sharing; stare discounts top products. 

JCPenney Styling Salon 

Lakehursr Mall 
ContactSally 473-0340 



Secretary/Substitute Coordinator 

iLake County public school Director of Instruction is 
[seeking a 12-month, full-time secretary /substitute coor- 
Idinator. Applicant must have exceptional secretarial and 
lorganizational skills; also, knowledge of the Macintosh 
(computer and WordPerfect 3.0. Excellent written and 
loral communication skills required. Pleasant working 
[conditions, competitive salary, and excellent employee 
'fits. Please send letter of application and resume to 1 
ISchool District 103, Office of the Superintendent, 1370 
iRiverwoods Road, Lake Forest, IL 60045. 

BBBBHBBBBHBBBBHHBBBBBBHBHBHHBHHB! 



FACTORY 

anil Shift 

Transformer mfgr. needs men & women for assembly, 
inspection, end packing assignments. We need ener-| 
getjc, self-starters & team players! 

•4 Day - 40 Hour Work Week, Mon.-Thure. 

•Life, Health & Dental Benefits 

•401 K Retirement Plan 

•Paid Vacation & Holidays 

Apply in Person To: 

aciown Eif cmocoi. 

2414 Hlghview St. Spring Grove, IL 60081 
(815) 675-6641 

9SHB0BSBBHHHBaHBHSaBBBSHBQSBBHBBl 



AttEMBLYTECHNICIAN 

Fluid power equipment manufacturing company seek- 
ing full-time assembly technldan: Experience with pro- 
duction of hydraulic components preferred. Job duties 
include assembly, testing &c repairs. Applicants subject to 
mechanical aptitude skill testing. Heavy lifting required. 
Salary commensurate with skill level. Health benefits. 
Non-smoking environment. Applications taken between 
9-1 1 a.m. Monday & Friday or call for appointment. 

(708) 566-5700 

WAN DFLUH OF AMERICA 

913 High St. 
Mundeleln 




t»>Wff! T fWf1fTt 



E N E 




FLEXIBLE HOURS 

INCENTIVE PROGRAMS 

PAID TRAINING 

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY 
CALL SUE FOR AN APPOINTMENT 

AT 708-816-2800 



r, 
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CLASSIFIED UktlANd Newspaper m*?by 1 994 






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|i. J i 
lh* 




220 



Help Wanted 

Fall-Time 



#*#%#* 

^£,0 


Hdn Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



J PRCiimnn 

SNeed only apply.J 

SLetterpreea and Offset! 

JPrinting. Full Time.| 
JSmal! Shop. 




MAINTENANCE 

Camp Duncan Is seeking 
a reliable, dependable full 
time maintenance assistant. 
Duties include maintenance, 
grounds keeping and clean 
Ing. Benefits included. Apply 
in person. 

Second position: part time 
seasonal grass cutter. 

YMCA Camp Duncan 

32305 N.Hwy .12 
Inglestde, IL 60041 



Shop Foreman 

Custom sheet mewl fabrica- 
tion shop. Must have a mini- 
mum Of 5 YRS. SHOP EXPERI- 
ENCE. Knowledge of Round 

LAYOUT A PLUS. WE OFFER VERY 
COMPETITIVE WAGES & BENE- 
FITS. APPIY IN PERSON Mon. 
FRt. 7:J0 AM - 9.J0 AM, 

40126 N. RTE. 8 J 

(AT GRASS LAKE RD.) 

ANTIOCH 

or call Peter Lbmann 
AT 708-19^7997 



ACCOUNTING 
CLERK 

We have an Immediate 
opening for an account 
ing clerk with experi 
ence in telemarketing 
and collections. 
Musi be mature, reliable 
and motivated. 
Call 

STATE OIL 

COMPANY 

(708) 546-2161 



SCHOOL 
CUSTODIANS 

Immediate opening for 

Full-Time and Part Time 

School Custodians. 

Evening hours. 
Benefits for full-time. 

Apply in person 

7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

Round Lake Area 

Schools Dist 116 

Director of 

Support Services 

District Service Center 

811 N. Sunset Drive 

Round Lake, IL 60073 



220 


1 Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Drtvara 

SPOTTER 

(Gumee Area Loc.) 

On site I ank-wash/df Ivor posi- 
tion. Must have CDL with 
Hazmat & Tank endorse- 
ments. Full-time permanent 
posRIorvTIex tire, Good hourly 
rate & full Co. benefits pkg. 
Coll tor appt. 

708/594-2200 ext. 314 



Janitorial I 

Nostalgia McDonald's 

of Gumee Mills 

needs to fill 

Janitorial position. 

Gall 
(708) 8SS-0229 

ASKFORALEX 

E.O.E. 



LIGHT 
ASSEMBLY 

Short hours 
for day* 

Sweet MFG Corp. 

(70S) 546-5575 



PSYCHO 

SOCIAL AIDE 

Long term care facility seek- 
ing Individual with good 
verbal and written commu- 
nication skills. Must have 
high school diploma. Call or 
apply in person to: 

North Shore Terrace 

2222 W. 14th St 
Waukegan, IL 

(708) 249-2400 

equal opportunity employer 



3rd SHIFT 

Midnight to 8:00 a.m. 

PLASTIC INJECTION 
MOLDING FOREMAN 

Full time with overtime, 
benefits. 

Apply In Person 

JAMES 
INJECTION MOLDING 

300 Pfingsten Road 
' Northbrpok, IL 



L 



GENERAL 
OFFICE 

Mxjnt MuttiM, i Ui*>g mtntiio- 
Utk I ditiWof el hMpitil «*?pfM 
*nd mt6af product!, oftwi tw mri*- 
&*\* ooporfcriiy lor • Qwwril Ofk« 
da*. 0u*H*d wdditoi mud hmt 
uedltnl hping tklt (mn. BS wpm), 
Hpwtonw «* WordPatad S.I tnd 
tw iy iv to hind* miiipt* priorifoi 
ind bum ptrnm prwtou* SwtfcrW 
«p. dtira. To i<k* Into on hmOmI 
b*o»hi p**ij» In i tuH»e*d •mri- 
( Mntrt, (Mm al or Mod www to: 

MEDLINE . 

INDUSTRIES, INC. 

Employment DtpL OC 

On* M«jlint Pltca 

MundMn.IL 600604486 

fTM)MM0»» 
EOEfn/W* 



TEfVfPORARY 
PERMANENT OPPORTUNITY 

16K 

Our client located in Wheeling is seeking a motivated & outgoing penon to 
input data and perform general office duties. Call Sheril 

Office Team 

Dlv. of Robert Half Intl 

One Northbrook Dr. #370 

Northbrook, IL 60062 

(708) 480-2073 Fax: 480-1872 

EEOC/NoFeei 



PHonc imcs 

Are you looking for a Summer Job? • 
Earn S7'S 10 per hour 

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY 

Part and Full time available. ■ 
Ideal for students, homemakers and retirees. 

CAU 
(708) 561 5641 

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
AFTER 2:00 P.M. 



ASSEMBLERS 
ELECTRONIC 

We are in need of assemblers to assemble electro- 
mechanical products. Individuals should have sol- 
dering and electro-mechanical assembly experience 

\ Apply at: 

Danaher Controls 
1675 Delany Road 
Gurnee, IL 60031 



We are an international company continuing to build 
up our production facility in Cary. 

MACHINE OPERATORS INSPECTORS 

ALL SHIFTS ALL SHIFTS 

Should ha ve familiarity around production Visually Inspect very sma II 

equipment Some equipment requires parts under a microscope. 

nacnii 



experience with automated machines. 

SHIPPING/RECEIVING 
STOCKROOM 

Minimum 2 yean' experience in this field. 

Experience with tnfl and domestic carriers a 

must. Also handle up to 70 lbs 



Experience not necessary. 

MACHINE TECHNICIANS 
2ND AND 3RD SHIFTS 

Experience with automated 

equipment, 2yr tech degree with 

good mechanical aptitude. 



. — . , — .„. — „ _, 

Please apply In penon between 8 AM and 5 PM. Benefits Include medical & dental Insurance, 

tuition reimbursement plan, profit-sharing and 401 K. 

We are located at the comer of Sliver Lake Rd. and three Oaks Rd. 



eoiietojt 



1102 SILVER LAKE ROAD • CARY 



220 



Help Wanted 
ftiU-Timc 



HVAC/SHECT 
METAL INSTALLER 

lake Villa contractor 
letting experienced imtalltr. 

Call (lot) lfS-l40t 



TEACHERS/ . 
ASST. TEACHERS - 
PLEASE READl 

Exceptional top pay career 
and personal growth oppor- 
tunities now available at NW 
Suburbs' leading child care 
learning centers. We will 
train. Full time/part time 
$6-$10 per hour. 
Call Dma at our Personnel Office 

1-800-720-0250 



marriott's 

Lincolnshire 

Resort 

Full Time & Part Time 
positions available for 

Cooks, 
Servers 

Mon., Tues., Thurs. 

9AM to 3PM 
and by appointment 

(708) 634-0100 Ext. 6142 

equal opportunity employer 
M/F/D/V 



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HBBBHBBHHBHBBBOBBHHHBBHBHB 
g AUTO GLASS INSTALLER g 

|] Immediate full time position available for an experienced fj 
|] installer to perform mobii Installations In Lake County. We fj 
I] offer full benefits and a competitive salary that comrnensu-rj 
U rates with experience. Send resume or apply in penon at; [] 

KLEIN-DlCKERT GLASS Q 

gj 5515 60th Street |j 

g Kenosha, WI 5314+ 4 

p M-F 8:00 am - 5:00 pm rj 

BQuyyaoyHBOBBHaByHBaayBHya 



IMMEDIATE OPENING 

Expanding auto service organization is seek- 
ing "undercar" technicians. Must be ener- 
getic, professional, and able to relate to peo- 
ple. Special consideration given to those with 
muffler shop experience. Aggressive pay 
program and benefits. Excellent long term 
potential. Contact Mr. Paul Socha 

(708) 223-0012 



YARD MAN 



WOLOHAN 
LUMBER 



Full and Part Time 
Apply in Person 

Rt. 83 Grayslake, IL 



EXTRUSION OPERATORS^ 

Due to our company expansion, we are seeking ^ 
bright, dependable extrusion operators. Must haveK 
good work ethics, technical aptitude, basic math 



Suwt I 

■ bright, dependable extrusion operators. Must havel^ 

^good work ethics, technical aptitude, basic mathj 

■skills & willingness to work. Plastics experience &h 

kTtbrk life knowledge helpful. Excellent career^ 



§ 



advancement opportunity and a 



benefit package! 
icat, dental, life &^ 



S available which includes group medical, aentai, me &^ 
disability. 401 (k) plan eligible after 9'mos. employ-^ 
hment. Please inquire with Personnel Manager at: 



Jy/ 



EX-TECH PLASTICS, INC. , 

03 U.S. 1 2 South Richmond, IL 60071 ^ 



Equal Opportunity Employ w 



INDEPENDENT 
SALES PEOPLE 

Call 800-523-2367 if you have had EXPERIENCE sell- 
ing fasteners, terminals, chemicals, body clips, abra- 
sives, welding alloys, or similar maintenance products 
to the industrial/automotive aftermarket. You may 
qualify to sell our over 24,000 item inventory. 
Competitive prices. Need less paperwork and more 
time to sell? Check out MPI1 



t*«*«*«.*««.re r 



Assembly & Packaging 

'$•.00 to ta.76 per hour 

'Ubertyvllle Location 

"Clean Manufacturing Facility 

'Long Term 

Mat* 2nd Shrfta 

•3&4S Houre/Week With Flexibility 

'Great Opportunity 

S S S 

Call today for immediate consideration, 

MANPOWER 

708-918-1200 



220 



Help Wanted 
FulIrTlme. . 



JOBS! JOBS! JOBS! 

HUNDREDS OF 
PERMANENT CAREER 
OPENINGS • 

. ACCURATE 

241 4 GRAND AVE. 

WAUKEGAN, IL 
(708)244-2511 



TELEMARKETING 

$$CASHPAIDDAILY$$ 

Start Today! 

No Experience 

f neccesary 

Earn $200-$400 

per week. 

MUNDELEIN 

(708)949-9240 



S 



We have openings In our 
Waukegan/Gurnee area 
residential home for ado- 
lescents w/autlsm, Must 
have valid drlv, lie. & be 
21+. Start $6,28/hr. 
w/excel. benefits. Call 
Supervisor at 263-0097. 
EOE. 



POOL 

ATTENDANTS 

NEEDED 

For local 

apartment 

complex. 

Make money 

while you get 

a great tan. 

Call 

f70ll 293-0102 




225 



Business 
Opportunities 



"WHOLESALE DEALERS- 
LOG HOMES" Kiln-dried 
logs. Excellent profits! Pro- 
tected territory. Full/Part- 
time. Business Opportunity. 
Call MrJones. 1/800-321- 
5647. Otd Timer Log 
Hotnee, Mt Juliet, TN. 

WICKER PLUS HOME PAR- 
TIES Looking (or Sales Rep- 
resentatives. Part-time. Full- 
time. Small Investment. 
Company Paid Hostess 
Plan. Average 9604»r party. 
Call Lyrtn (708)497-3903. 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 
FOR THE 00'at Heath Plus 
Wealth. Part-time OK. Under 
$100. start-up cost. Call 
1/800-8B7-4NFL; ext.S641 
24hr. recorded message. 

GRAYSLAKE- RESALE OP- 
PORUNITY- Turn-Key opera- 
tion. Excellent focallon with 
parking. Established busi- 
ness. Fully computerized. 
Under $30,000. 

(708)223-^433. 

MLM FIRST 5-level FILLED 
BY HEALTH QUEST INTER- 
NATIONAL, Sprlnglleld IL. 
2/ways to Joint EZQ 
S39.00/month, Insured cus- 
tomer, $69.00/month. For 
application call alter 4pm. 
(708) 587-3447. 

SUNQUEST WOLFF TAN- 
NING BEDS. New commer- 
cial- home units. From 
S 199.00. Lamps- Lotions- 
Accessories. Monthly pay- 
ments tow as $18.00. Call 
today Free new color cata- 
log. 1/B0O-462-9197. 



METAL BUILDING 
MANUFACTURER 

selecting small to large 
bulider/dealer In tome 
open areas. High profit 
potential, accepting only 
best qualified. 

(303)759-3200, ext. 2401 



THE WINNING TEAM 




,rou 

7 AND THE 
.CUSSIflEDS 

ifr row 
. whe ne rou 

WANT TO GO 



240 



Child Care 



U w 1 * *~ 



'LITTLE CASTLE" DAY- 
CARE- Grayslako. Conveni- 
ent school bus route In from 
for school Dfstrist #46. Meals 
Included, Full-time am/pm, 
(708)548-1138. 

CERTIFIED RED CROSS BA- < 
BYSfTTER, Hyf.okJ will care 
lor your child Friday or Satur- 
day nights, In your Round 
Lake/ Grayslake J>pme,„pall 
Travis alter '5pm* (708) 
546-9038. 

ENGLISH NANNY/MOTHER 
OF 2&4yr.old will care lor 
your 18/month old+up, In my 
home. FulLparWIme, fenced 
yard, playroom, meats and 
lots of .love provided, 
5/rnlnutes west ot Rt.59 on 
Grass Lake Rd. ; (70S) 
587-0451 .anytime. ./,'-■ 

FOX LAKE 15yr.old wilting 
lo care for your children, 
week-ends and occasional 
weeknlghts In your home. 
Dayhours after June 7th. Ex- 
cellent with babies, very re- 
sponsblO. Mom. Is registered 
nurse. References. Reason- 
able rates. (708) 587-5626. 

FUN, ACTIVITIES AND 
LOTS OF TLCI CoBege edu- 
cated Mom will care for your 
child. Just off Grand Ave., 
Gumee. (708) 662-4997. f 

GRAYSLAKE CHILD CARE 
NEEDED for 2/chldren, Mon- 
day -Thursday 7:15am- 
4:45pm Non-smoker, refer- 
ences required. (706) 
54Q-87S7. 

SPECIAL ED/ TEACHERS 
AIDE, has openings In her 
Grayslake home MON.-FRI. 
6am. tl 5:30pm. Infants wel- 
come. Have references. 
(708) 548-4424. 

GURNEE (GRANDWOOD 
PARK) Mom, has futl-tlme 
opening- ages 2/up. Non- 
smoking, fenced-in yard, 
playmates. Snacks/meals 
provided. Call Leslie: (708) 
356-9946. *<| 

GURNEE MOM HAS open- 
ings tor chlldcare, days or 
nights, any ages. Near Lake- 
huret Mall. (706) 249-6447. 

JOB^WANTED;^ 
BABYSITTER- Responsible 
Teenage boy win S&rolhers 
and 1 /sister, would Ike to ba- 
bysit for your children. I will 
make sure your children 
have tun and are wel taken 
care of. Cal (708)546-6746 
or Leave message on ma- 
chlne. .*'-■' 

LOVING MOTHER WITH ex- 
perience and references win 
care tor your child In my 
Lake Vila home. Large yard, 
' meats and snacks provided. 
(708) 356-9067. 

■mmaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiP^iiBiiB^AMBH^^i^B^B^B^ 

A MATURE ADULT NEED- 
ED TO care lor our 2/chlid- 
ren In our Gumee home. 
Weekdays. References and 
own transporatlon required. 
(708) 244-4895. 

MCHENRY/ LAKEMOOR 
AREA mom, wants to give 
your child affordable TLC. 
Full or part-time. References. 
(815) 344-9181. 

MOM HAS (1)OPENING In 

her licensed Grayslake home 
Monday thru Wednesday. 
Lola of Fun, TLC, activities, 
and toys. Relable- Great ret- 
erences. Call Kathy (708) 
548-1236. 

MOTHER OF (1)WILL care 
for your child In my Gages 
Lake home, full-time open- 
ing. Call Sandy, (708) 
223-7269. 

NEEDED: NURTURING PER- 
SON for 5/day a week care, 
2/daughters eges 446, in 
our Grayslake home: Must 
have own transportation. 
Please cal (708) 680-751 1 ■ 

VERNON HILLS- WILL baby- 
si lull-time In my home. New- 
boms to 5yra. AM of TLC. 
(7 08) 81 6-8582^ 

■ g jeea — a iS 




v 



»!i*#**4Mft* 











* r <M*y 6; W4 Ukkrid N&spADto 'CLASSIFIED' 




\j 






E^ffi 



Good Things To Eat 




304 


1 Appliances 



AGE-OLD YORKVULE AN- 
TIQUES MARKET. JUNE 18- 
19. JULY 16-17, AUGUST 
13-14. Hundred of dealers 
undor dozens of canopies 
and outside. Quality an- 
'"tlquoa'"only at the boautlful 
Kendall Co. Forest Preserve 
In YoritvDIe, 45/mllos west of 
Chicago. Hwy 71 at 47. 
Food, Free Parting. $3. Dial: 
1/BOO-OLD-N-QOOD. 

ANTIQUE OAK QUEEN 

Anne dining 'room set; 
3/Ioaves, 6/chalra, buflet, ex- 
cellent condition. $1,900 
(708) 244-4608, after 6pm. 

ANTIQUE SLOT MACHINE 
Collection: Direct from Ve- 
gas, completely restored Har- 
rah'a 5* Brass Pace slot, 
original 25* Qolden Nugget 
slot, Balty's 56 slot, Gay 90's 
video' Poker 25*. solid oak, 
$1,400 to 50,200. Also Full 
size plnball machlno, $750, 
(708} 980-5235. 



FRIDGEDARE ALL-IN-ONE 
APARTMENT size wash-; 
er/dryer, Almond, $300. 
Apartment sized stove, .al- 
mond, 2yrs. old, $150. 
Phone after 5pm. (414)857- 
7615, or leave message. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC 

WASHER and Dryer, 4yrs. 
old. Call after 5:30pm. (708) 
740-1862. 

MUST SELL NEW KEN- 
MORE Washer/dryer. Full 
size. Electric. Paid $950. Sell 
$650. Call Ed or Mary (708) 
872-0411. •/ 

USED APPLIANCE SALE- 

Washers, dryers, refrigera- 
tors and ranges. Recondi- 
tioned and guaranteed, 
$85/up. Largest selection In 
Lake County. BOB'S USED 
APPLIANCES 711 Diamond 
Lake Rd., Mundeleln, IL 
(708)94f*-1110. 



w 



% 



I 



Grayslake 

Antiques 
Collectibles 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, Illinois 
Illinois .120 &U.S. 45. 

8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

SUNDAY 
, MAY 8 

Admission '3.00 



Refrigerators, . 
Washers, Dryers 

all reconditioned, all 
guaranteed. Also new 
and used parte for most 
major appliances. 

C70S) 949-1110 



310 



Baxun/Crafe 



*DONT FORGET Your Sp+ 
eM MOM tfife Mothmf Day/ 

************ 

* Coming Soon * 

TO 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



* 
• 
* 
* 
* 
* 



LptRlYVILLt 

Before k After 

* Ceramics Shoppe } 

Pte-opening 
class Specials 




* 

* Pre-opening * 

* class Specials J 
*Call(7ii)*I4-*212* 
J lor fsrtker JeUfle } 
************ 




t 1 

1 


S33 


Handyman 


1 
1 

I 


D a Q. CONSTRUCTION and 
HANDYMAN Senrlca. We 
do ALL home Improve- 
ments: drywall, painting, re- 
pairing AND even appliance 
Hookups! 1-caB does It ALLl 
2Syrs. Experience. (708) 
740-0306. 


B 


S39 


Housekeeping 


n 
e 
t- 


BABE-A-MAIDS. THE 
NAME says 1 all. Call us to- 
day. Ask about our Mother's 
Day Special. (414) 657-3303. 


9. 


urn ice r 


1 PAHIWR DONE- 




BOXES AND PAPER for 

Moving, enough for 

6.000/to. shipment. $75. Call 
(703)546-9038. 

MOVING?? CALL BOB The 
Mover. Furniture; pianos; 
safes; restaurant equipment; 
Light machinery. Lift gate 
van and small crane trucks. 
PACK RAT Enterprises. 
(708)662-1 956. 



S93 


Trees/Plants 



RITE. Efficient- Affordable 
and Thorough. Many, Many 
references. Call (70S) 
546-4750 or (708) 

546-1264. 

MEAN MAIDS- WE Hate and 
Terminate Dim Will clean 
Navy quarters, guaranteed 
to pass Inspection, also 
house cleaning. References. 
Call Tilly, (708) 726-2041, 
OR (708)746-2245. 



TREE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Clearing 
Seasoned Hardwood 

Nordstrom Itee 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 
708-526-0858 



S42 



Landscaping 



1 



S99 



Miscellaneous 
Services 



•ROTOTILLINQ SERVICE* 
Gardens- Lawrn- Troy Till- 
er. Quality Service. Rea- 
sonable Tatee. Jim: (701) 
MB-43S2. 



MULCH 

Shredded Cedtr S30/cuyd 
Shredded Oak 530/cm yd 

dean Cedar Chipa $30/cu yd 
Qean Oak Chipa $30/cu yd 
FREE DELIVERY 
$8 per yd to spread 
VuafMatUrcard Acetpttd 
CALL 

SURECREEN 

PM) 4J3-HM or 14M403-5150 



BOTTLED WATER COOL- 
ERS LEASING Agent has 
coolers for .sale as low as 
$95. Ful Guarantee. Ask for 
Greg. (815) 675-6430, for in- 
formation. 



THEME* A 
LOTTO 

digest » 



LedMleKd ■•wapspen 

so 8, Whitest. 
G royal ok*, IL WOO 

(7W) aas-siti 




CONTRACTORS EQUIP- 
MENT: CONCRETE forms/ 
compressor, ' power wheel 
barrels, pavement saw, 
flatbed ' truck. (708) 
526-0923. _^ 

LENNOX PULSE FURNACE- 
93% efficient: 60.000BTU, 
Up-flow, used 3/wlnters, 
$800. (414) 680-4520. 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



2S a SYLVANIA TV and 

stand. $75. negotiable.. 
(708)526-8902 

SO-CHANNEL PROGRAM- 
MABLE HAND HELD SCAN- 
NER, NEW! $115. (70S) 
785-8546, eves. ■ 

ALPINE CASSETTE- PULL- 
OUT DECK, $250 (708) 
648-7213. 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 



AFTER YOU'VE HAD YOUR 

BIG SALE, and there is still 
things that just did not go.... 
Call us at LAKELAND News- 
papers and run R under the 
'FREE or Giveaways' classi- 
fied column. FREE ADS are 
NO CHARQEI (708) 
223-8161, ext. 140. 

ESTATE SALE- ENTIRE 
HOUSE'e furnishings- 
tvs, Microwave, Lawn mow- 
er, chata, tables, lamps, and 
MUCH MORE! Thurs.-Satur- 
day, May 12-15 8am-5pm 
294 Normandy. Grayslake. 

FRIDAY MAY.GIh, SATUR- 
DAY, MAY.7th, Sem-Spm 
(No. EanyBlrds) 612 Burton, 
Highland Park, (between 
Roger Williams & Clavey- 
Rds.) YOUR BEST OFFER 
FOR HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, 
Toys, Computer, Deak, A 
FURCOAT1 

QARAGE and OTHER 
STUFF SALE- Saturday 
ONLY 11am-4pm. Llberly- 
viiit. 61$ Jumper Pkwy. Mi- 
crowave, TV, Computer soft- 
ware and books, sound 
card, -CD's, Large scale train 
cars, bedroom healer, 2-line 
cordless telephone,, stamps 
for collectors, kitchen stuff, 
QUESTIONS? Call (708) 
367-8720. 



OARAGE SALE- Couch, Pia- 
no, Computer, household 
Items and Misc. SATURDAY 
May 7, 9am-3pm, 262 S«y- 
mour, Qraystake. 

QARAGE SALE- SAT.SUN 
MAY 748 and MAY 14+15, 
10am til 4pm. Stereo speak- 
ers, weight equipment, adult 
clothes, books, misc. house- 
hold. 3460 Country Club 
Ave, Gurnee. 

(708)688-3404, exU55. 

LAMPS, NINTENDO, GAR- 
DEN TOOLS, Clothes and 
Misc. Items. FRIDAY MB and 
SATURDAY 5/7,8am-7 1042 
Quincy. Westgate, Qumee. 

MAY 12,13 8,14th. Thurs, 
Friday, Sat. 9-4pm (all 
days). 614-Bonner Rd., 
Wauconda. Uttie Tykes toys; 
Crafts; Antiques; Clothes; 
Furniture, Many Household 
needsl "* 

SPORTS COLLECTOR GA- 
RAGE SALE-SUNDAY 5/8 
9am-3pm Card sets; Auto- 
graphs; Etc. Fox River Shore 
Subdn. Off Rfe.176, 3484 
Plymouth Ln., Island Lake. 

WlNNETKA CONGREQA- > 
TIOMAL CHURCH- 
61st ANNUAL 
RUMMAGE SALE. 

Comer Pine/Lincoln. 
WInnetka. THURS. MAY 12, 
7am -4pm. 32-depts. of Mer- 
chandise. FREE bus ride 
w/tranafar to/from Linden 
"ErtUtlon. 

i" — — : — m 

WEDNESDAY 10 A.M. 
is the deadline for 
. classified ads! 
I (708)223-8161 



BEEF- STOCK YOUR 
FREEZER with hormone im- 
plant free home grown bee!. 
Quarters, halves, sold by 
dressed weight, 51.62*. In- 
cludes processing cost. Cal 
for further details: (414) 
539-2918. 




17 th Annual 
Rummage Sale 

New/old items. 
Largest Inventory ever! 

Bargatm twitter's 
pmrwdtsB, 25< 6 upl 

Numberi 1/2 fir. before ule 

1 o% discount coupon to first 

10 customer! each day 

Deerfidl Daycare Center 

445P»ne(lUdtbetTT*PiB«) 
Kay 5-8 

Thtn. 7pr*-9pm • PH. 8am-8pm 
Sat Sam-fpm • Sun 12n-4pnt 

(708)945-4290 



^COMMUNITY 
GARAGE SALE 

Heather Ridge 

Community 

"Garage Sate" 

May 14, 1994 
from 9 am to 3 pm 

Headier Ridge Club 

House Parking Lot 

Rt,120&Rt.21 

in Gurnee 

Food will be soldi 

I L - =dJ 



GARAGE SALE 

Thurs. May 19 8-4 pm 
, Fri.May20 8-6 pm 

421 LakewDodTerr. 

Off Washington, just east of Cedar Lake Rd. 
Round Lake Beach 

Proceeds benefit Tough love, 
parent support group for troubled teens. 

Donations accepted. Call (708) 740-9553 . 
or drop off on Mo n. eve* . only at 
Round Lake Park Ditt. between 7-9 pm, Room 1 14 



GARAGE 
SALE 



TO 



(No-Kill Animal Shelter In Crystal Lake) 



AT 



WE ARE LOOKING FOR GOOD, 

WORKABLE ITEMS FOR THIS FUNDRAISER. 

YOUR DONATIONS ARE ALL TAX-DEDUCTIBLE. 

"WE ARE ESPECIALLY INTERESTED IN COSTUME JEWELRY 

CALL LISA AT (708) S87-B870 OR 

YVONNE AT (70S) 815-8348 

IF YOU HAVE ANY ITEMS TO DONATE. 

NO LARGE APPLIANCES OR CLOTHING, PLEASE. 



338 



Horses & Tacks 



988 KEJFER BUILT Bumber 
poll, 3-horse slant, walk In 
tack, horse trailer, Iks' new, 
$4,495A)e*1. Western roping 
saddle, 16lnch seat, $300 
Rich, (708) 991-7243. 



340 



Household Goods 
Puratlure 




340 



Houdrold 
(kMds/fereJmre 



EASY CHAIR, SOFA and 

Loveseat. Blue, mauve, and 
cream tones. Excellent con- 
ditlon, MUST SELL! $550. 
(708)548-1 048. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bed- 
room, complete $1,100. Din- 
ing room set, $1,700 Cherry. 
ALSO Sleigh bedroom set, 
$1;745. All In PERFECT con- 
dition. MUST SELL! 
(708)548-1045. . 

MODEL HOME CONTENTS, 

SofaAoveseal set, Hunter 
Green and Cranberry, new 
$595, other sets plaids etc. 
Dining room set 10 piece, , 
$1,595. From Builders 
Model Home. (708)329- 
4119. 

ANTIQUE OAK PEDASTAL 

table and oak side board, 
$1,500/both. (414) 

694-9348. 

BEAUTIFUL PAtDAft Barber 
chair, hunter green, good 
condition, $1,195; (6)oak 
chairs, $300/b«st; Antique 
.working tailor's sewing ma- 
chine in wood cabinet, $175. 
(709) 382-8088. 

BOXES AND PAPER for 
Moving, enough (or 
6,000*. shipment. $75. Call 
(708)546-9038. 

BRASS BED, QUEEN with 
orthopedic mattress set, un- 
used, sill boxed, cost $1,000 
sol: $325. Delivery available 
(706) 449-7108. 

BRASS HORSES- (2)LARGE 
wall brass horses. Hang over 
fireplace, etc. Just reduced 
to $5004>afr. Must see (708) 
587-4302. _ 

CHINA CABINET AND BUF- 
FET, $125. PORTABLE Ra- 
dios, Metal crutches, Space 
heater, Trailer hitch, Outdoor 
TV antenna. (708)395-8050. 

COMPLETE BEDROOM 

SET, SOLID OAK 4-poster, 

Perfect condition, sacrifice, 
$1,695. (708) 374-0203. 

DAYBED- WHITE IRON 
and Brass, with 2/orthopedlc 
mattresses, AND pop-up trun- 
dle, unused, stll boxed, cost 
$800- sell $325. Delivery avail- 
able. (708) 449r7108. 

DINING ROOM SET, China 
Hutch, table, 6/chIare, very 
good condition, $700. Elec- 
tric stove, $50. (708) 
548-7903. 

. DINING ROOM SET. QUEEN 
ANN Cherrywood, 9-ptece. al- 
most new. $1,695. ALSO 
QUEEN ANN Oak Dining set, 
9-plece, 104 Inch table, 
60lnch China. Perfectl Must 
seel (706) 374-0203. 

DINING ROOM TABLE, cus- 
tom pad, 6/chalrs, very good 
condition, double pedestal 
type, traditional style, 
$500/best otter. ONYKO 
Stereo System, 2/cassette 
decks, 4/speakers, equalizer, 
turntables, Dolby sunound 
sound, $l,000/best. Ufestze 
Ceramic Statue, female, 
$4,000/best offer. (708) 
740-2789, or leave mes- 



EXCELLENT CON0IT1ION- 

4/PIECE sectional, Including 
Ike new end and coffee ta- 
bles. $625/best (414) 
862-6458, leave message. 

GRANDFATHER AND 
GRANDMOTHER Clock. 
Beautiful Cherry Kneehole 
Desk. 28' Steel Ladder. Elec- 
trolux Sweepers. Best Oil- 
ersfjoa) 395-2993. 




340 


Household 

GOMWBatflllBtC 



HELP SAVE MY DINING 
TABLE, too large for house. 
Must sell or Husband may 
use as Wood Project. Large, 
pedestal type, 6/chalrs, 
(2/arm) custom pad. 
$4O0/offer. (708)740-2789, 
or leave message. . 

KING SIZE WATERBEO 
WITH Mirrored headboard, 
and canopy. $650 (708) 
740-4846. 

KING SIZE WATER8ED- 
deluxe mirror/lighted head- 
board, one motion fbertw mat- 
tress, $200. (708)336-5413.. 

LEATHER- 
SOFA AND loveseat. TOP- 
GRAIN, GLOVE SOFT, 
NEVER USED. $950. 
(708)548-1046. 

MATTRESS SETS, ANY 
size, never used, ratal, $500- 
$1,100. Sacrifice: $135- 
$295. (708) 913-8965. 

MUST SACRIFICE 3-PIECE 

Irving room set, pald- 
$1,700; asking $1,000; 
4/plece end table set, pald- 
$900, asking $600; Enter- 
tainment center, paid- $185, 
asking $100; Bookcase, 
Paid- $160, asking $80; La- 
dies 120 Bass Accordfan, 
$100; Wheelchair $250. All 
In Excellent oondiion, wl ne- 
gotiate. (708) 838-1716, 
leave message 

PIONEER lOOAvatt STEREO 

fm/am dual cassette deck, 
amp wtth equalizer, all In 
cabinet, large 3-way speak- 
ers. $400/ wtth remote. (708) 
746-7940. 

QUEEN SIZE HIDE-A-BED, 
2yrs. okf, excellent condition, 
$250; 4/blece bedroom set, 
excellent condition, $200. 
(708)223-5062. 

QUEEN SIZE MATRESS 
BOX SPRING AND FRAME, 
$200. (708) 546-1128, mes- 
' sage/after 6pm or weekends. 

SLEEPER SOFA, 78/INCH- 
long, Brown twoed.wth blue 
accents, very good condl- 
tlon. S115. (708) 746-7676. 

SOFA, 94/lnclt, CUSTOM 
FLEX Steel rotted arm. high 
back, Greenish blue wth tiny 
peach (towers. lyr.okJ. Excel- 
lent condrtion. Paid $900 wfll 
sacrifice, $350. (708) 
223-6499, mornings or after 
5pm. : ' . 

SOLID OAK ENTERTAIN- 
MENT UNIT- Mvlng room fur- 
niture, couch, 2 wing back 
chairs, 3 tables, car lop bice 
rack (708)265-9250. 

TRADITIONAL STYLE 
LOVESEATS, blue and 
green, crewel fabric. Excelent 
condtlton. Paid $1,600 for pak, 
will sell for $350 for set. 
(708)249-5493, leave mes- 
sage. 



WASHER -DRYER SET. GE, 

Heavy duty large eapady, 
good condition. $250/set or 
best offer. 5/plecxe Living 
room set, Brown , pattern, 
good condition, $100 (708) 
785-1332, leave message. 

^ DtceiATM's rmrrwi * 



DiMf mm, Quni km, 

diirjawi &fcM dan (UN 

(kiu oak* fTtS 

kanea, Cpsittr, dtrTpmd JU$0 
Qurn aiM, tali 

imti taVa «/dain .' f l,(M 

(ckiM mlaUi) 

OaVkawiMt ii,ho 

iftrnt Ik Hairw t«, IfW flit 

i (7e»)8»y-i— - 



344 


Jwdiy 



DIAMOND PENDENT- Inlial 
V. Diamonds on 14ct. wh«e 
gold. $250. (708) 336-5912 ■ 

ENGAGEMENT/ WEDDING 

SET. Appraised $1,300, ask- 
ing- $900/best. I4ct. white 
gold, l/4cl.round, 19/sma(l 
damonds. (70 8)336-5912. 



348 



Ixira/Gahlea 



24hp GARDEN /FARM Trac- 
tor, used only lOAlmes, 
brand new, front and rear 
PTO, snowblower and gar- 
den tires. $4,oooA>est (708) 
587-5362. 

DYNAMARK RIDING LAWN- 
MOWER, 8hp, 32lnch cut- 
ling width, rear discharge, 
3/Iorward speeds, $400^>est 
offer (708) 223-4801, after 
7:30pm. 

HERBS- WETLANDS HERB 
FARM, 19239 GRAND, 
LAKE VILLA. Reopening 
5/14 9am-5pm. 2/rnites west 
c4 Gumen MHs,.southstde of 
Grand. 3/dtferent Lav- 
enders, 4/drfferent mints, 
Bay Laurel. Large Variety ot 
Everything else. (708) 
356-6304. 

ROTOTILLER- 10-inch, 

1.6t-^, compact gear drive, 
teas than lyr.old, price nego- 
tlabte. (708) 362-1342. 

SELF-PROPELLED MOWER 
WITH Bagger. Reasonable 
(708) S4 6-1505. 




350 



Miscellaneous 



(47)NINTENDO GAMES $10- 
$15 each. Nintendo power 
magazines, S2/each. Call 
Ertk (708) 587-5609. 

240ft. WOODEN BOAT Pier. 
Complete, Good condrtion, 
Make offer. ""ALSO HOT 
and COLD water cooler, 
$185.(708)487-6161. 

BABY STUFF: PORT-A- 

CRIB; playpen; high chain 
Ike new stroller, bassmett; re- 
cloving blankets, blankets; 
clothes; small rocking horse. 
Call after 5:30pm only! (708) 
740-2713. 




I HELPED SAVE A SMALL LIFE TODAY! 

The Assisi 

Animal 
Foundation 

ONE CAN 

MAKE A 

DIFFERENCE... 

TOGETHER WE'LL 

MAKE A MIRICLE. 

GIFTS ARE 

TAX DEDUCTIBLE. 

NOT FOR 

PROFIT... 

VOLUNTEER 



We don'l destroy homeless 
animals! They live their full lives 
uncaged if not adopted. We spay 
and neuter, conduct a dynamic pet 
visitation/therapy program for the 
elderly,- provide education 
programs for young people and 
offer a special "pet retirement" 
program, THANK YOU FOR 
YOUR HELPI 



JTJame^ 
I Address 
I City, St_ 
I Zip Code. 



I 



■Individual Membership $15 

iFamily Membership $20 Donation $_ 



Please mail to: Assist Animal Foundation 
P.O.B. 143 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 (815) 455-9411 



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CLASSIFIED UkdANd Newspapers May 6, 1994 




jTjl Fids & Supplies 



360 



Pets* 
Supplies 



350 


Miscellaneous 



350 


Miscellaneous 



DOLLS FOR SALE1 (10) Yo- 
landa Bello Collector Edi- 
tion Dolls.' All but 2 are 

signed by the artist. Have pa- 
pers and boxes. $t,500A»9l 
offer. Call alter 6pm. (708) 
456-4142. 

FORD THUNDERBIRD, 
1078, fair to- good condition, 
full power. $500. King slxe 
waterbed, frame, solid 
wood, mirrored hoadboard, 
full balded mattress. $350. 
(708) 855-1838. 

HOT TUB- BAJA CASITA, 

Black Marble, seats 4, 
$2,000 (414) 604-8332. 

PELLA 811. SLIDING door 
wilh screen, great condition, 
$500 (708) 249-2320. 

SERQER, BABYLOCK, 
736D, 4/thread, differencial 
feed, rolled hem, brand now, 
$585. (708) 223-9020. 

WHITE WEDDING GOWN, 
and veil, size 0, long sleeve, 
sweetheart neckline, Must 
seel $250/negotiable. (414) 
942-0811. 



BBBOBBBBBOBBBB 

NEW SPAS 

5-7 PERSON 
WHOLESALE PRICES 
WE ARE THE FACTORY \ 

(706)304-5337 
1-800-772-0020 

■BBBBBBBBBBBBBB 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR, 
RASCAL model Hardly 
used, $2,800 Sell lor 
$1.450/bost otter (815) 
385-6573. 

ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR, 

like new, 2/new batteries In- 
cluded. $1,600. GAS 
DRYER Whirlpool, Avacado, 
$95. Call alter 5pm 
(414)877-2718. . 



358 



Musical Instrument 



ItSWIMMING POOLS!! 
HUGE FAMILY SIZE POOLS 

Complete with LINER, FILTER. 

PUMP. COVER. LADDER, .and 
VACUUM. Holds 8,500 GALLONS. 
ONLY $895.00, Other moddt alia 

IniUll/Dcl extra. FINANCING. 
CALL TODAY 

1-800-323-7946 



ROLAND HP 000 Digital Pia- 
no, Black woodgraln llnlsh 
2yrs.old. $l,100/best (708) 
670-0344. 

YESI YOU DO have room 
lor tNs piano! 64 keys Ills any- 
where at 43x23x36 high. 
Sweet, lull sound, neutral 
wood finish, bench, $700. 
Days/eves. (708)662-0931. 



Boarding- RESPONSIBLE 
ADULTS WILL care for your 
dog or puppy. Exeallant ref- 
erences. Call for details: 
(708)966-8310, Florence. 

30-GALLON OAK AQUARI- 
UM has everything, with Ifeh. 
$i75*o st offer. (708) 
740-7542, alter 11am. 

AIREDALE PUPS, AKC, 
large breed, 12/weoks old, 
$400. Parents on premises. 
(708) 587-5028. 

AKC COCKER SPANIELS 
PUPS, <2)maJos, $175 each. 
(414)857-9247. 

AKC OFA CHAMPION ROT- 
TWEILER 2/male puppies, 
show, quality. More Into 
(708) 586-2824. after 6pm. 

AKC ROTTWEILLER PUP- 
PIES- 8/males, 10/lemales, 
beaulllul disposition, excel- 
lent bllodllne, parents on 
premises. Now taking depos- 
its. All puppies guaranteed. 
$500-$600 (708) 662-1655. 

AKC SAMOYED, ALL white 
female, 9/months old, 
$350*esl. Free metal cage, 
(708) 587-8034, leave mes- 
sage. 

AMERICAN ESKIMO UKC 

registered, 10/monlh old, 
neutered male, $200. (708) 

438-7001. 

DOG TRAINING AND COUN- 
SELING. At your Wits End? 
Fast- Easy- Convenient. (In 
your home) Guaranteed. 
References. (414) 657-4431. 



BETTER THAN A Kennel! 
MATURE dependable 

ADULTS WHI care for your 
DOGor Puppy while you go 
away on vacation, or wee- 
kend trips. Tendor loving 
care and at ion! Ion In our 
home. Largo Fenced yard. 
Must be able to get along 
with other sweelheart(dog) 
resident. Have Many Excel- 
lent References. Reason- 
able. Call anytime (708) 986* 
6310, Florence. 



COCKATIELS- 
(414)042-1271. 



$3S/each 



DALMATIONS- Purebred 
puppies, ready to go May 
1st. (414) 604-1706, alter 
3pm. 

ENGLISH SPRINGER, 

MALE, FOR Stud. Good 
family tree, 2yr.old. Medium 
size, whllo/llver. Reasonable 
rales. (708) 689-1776. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUP- 
PIES, Breed from Germany, 
AKC registered, OFA ap- 
proved, $350, your pick. 
Only Females tell, (708) 
746-5694. 



GERMAN SHEPHERD 

PUPS, German import cham- 
pion bloodlines. 'Best from 
Germany.* $750/up (312) 
630-9000, (708) 428-6928. 

GREAT DANE PUPS- Fawn, 
champion sired, pet and 
show, 550O/up. 

Cropped/shots, O.FA., (708) 
893-7112. 



Lakeland Newspapers 

and the 

Round Lake Area Park District 

Present 

JOB FAIR '94 





Whether you're 
looking for a job, 

or changing careers- 
you won't 
want to miss this! 



WHEN! Friday, May 20, 1994. 12 noon - 4 pm 

WHERE * . Round Lake Area Park District 

814 Hart Rd. (Corner of .Hart Rd. & Rt. 134) 
Round Lake, IL (Entrance off of Hart Rd.) 

Watch for the 1994 Lake County Employment Outlook in 
the May 13 edition of your local Lakeland Newspaper. 

For more information call 

(708)223-8161 




360 



Pets 4 
Supplies 



GREAT DANE SHOW Bitch 
puppy. 13/monlhs old, Show 
quality O.F.A., Cropped, 
shots, ready to got (708) 
803-7112. 

JACK RUSSELL TERRIER 
PUPPIES. 11 /weeks old. 
Males, excellent pedigree, 
$800 Call Julie, (706) 
438-0986. 

KEESHOND PUPS, AKC, 

available now, adorable, par- 
ents on promises, all shots. 
Call (708) 872-3337. 

LOVING ADULT HOUSE- 
HOLD seeking female 
KEESHOUND pet, under 
3yrs.old. Can provide love, 
attention and fenced yard, 
as well as other dog compan- 
ion. Call (708)966-6310, 
OR W you can provide Infor- 
mation on obtaining this type 
of dog. 




PETS IN NEED 
Needs Your Help! 

Here is a sample of a few 
of the animals we have 
available for adoption: 
Kittens and Cats, Lang A , 

short haired. 
5 week old klttens.Cho- 
colate Lab, Maltese, Dob 
mix, Chow mot puppy, Coon 
Hound, English Setter, Che- 
sapeake Bay Retriever, and 
many other small, medium 
end large dogs and puppies, 
Adopt from a shelter 
& receive your 
spay/neuter card. 
Be a responsible pet 
owner! 

(815)PAT-1462 
Pets In Need 



AKC ROTTWEILER PUPS, 
Bom 1/19/04. Tails and dew- 
claws, 1st and 2nd shots, 
have both parents. Call alter 
2pm, (708) 546-5662. 

SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPS, 

show quality, AKC, 
gray/White, silver/shite, $450 
(708) 487-1808. 

WEST HIGHLAND WHITE 
Terrier puppies, AKC, .$200. 
Call after 4pm and wee- 
kend.. (708) 740-1230. 

YOUNG BLUE-FRONT AMA- 
ZON, Excellent vocabulary, 
playful personality, 

$S00A>es1. S.S.MALE Afri- 
can Gray, excellent vocab- 
ulary, playful, SSOOTbest. 
(2)Proven breeder pairs Co- 
catlels, SSO/pair beat. 
Handfed Baby Cockatlels, 
$60. (708) 740-1351. 



368 



Tools ft 

Machinery 



CONCRETE TOOLS- 1€FT. 
shoot, 3ft. bowl float head, 
window well hopper, 40gal- 
ton form oH, $350. win sepa- 
rate. (708) 516-1960. 

PRESSURE WASHER, 

COLD water, gasoline, 
5-l/2hp. Honda engine, 
1500PSI, pump 320ORPM, 
2511. Hose and gun, 1093 
Model, Best oiler (708) 
546-3276, Don or Meianle. 

TOOL BOX, MATCO rolling 
cabinet/workbench. Asking 
$2,400 or best offer or trade 
for car, truck or Hariey. 
(414)697-1359. 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



ABLE TO PAY CASH for De- 
pression Glass, Old Lamps, 
Cookie Jars, Crocks, Tin 
Toys, Oak Furniture. Curved 
Glass China Cabinets, book- 
cases. Specializing In 1940's 
dining room, bedroom sets. 
(708)263-8562. 

PIANOS: CASH FOR ANY- 
THING UNDER 49-INCHES 
TALL. IN NEED OF RE- 
PAIRS OR NOT. WE ALSO 
SELL! (414)248-6491. 

Slot Machine* WANTED- 
ANV CONDITION- or Part*. 
Alto JUKE BOXES, MUSIC 
BOXES, Nickelodeon and 
Coke Machines. Paying 
CASH! Call (708)8tS-2742. 

•VAN WANTED-; 
1M2 TO 19*7- full size. 
(414)245-0305. 

WANTED: PAIR OF clown 
shoes and/or 'downing; ac- 
cessories. (708)265-0571 ( 
anytime* 



ANTIOCH 2-story Ranch on 

3/tols. Nice view of Lake Anti- 
och. 3-bedroom, fireplace, 
family room, 2-car .garage.' 
Owner may. holp llnance 
qualified party. $148,000 
(708)395-8961. 

ANTIOCH- BY OWNER. 2-3 

bedroom, 1.5car garage. 
Low taxes. Lake and beach 
rights, $95,000 or possible 
lease. $750/month. No 
Agents. (708) 395-1650. . 

GURNEE- 2-BEDROOM 

TOWNHOME, 1,5ba1hs. Den 
wilh gas fireplace. 2-car ga- 
rage. Private entrance, all 
appliances and window treat- 
ments. End unit. $99,000. 
(708) 85 5-0228. 

BY OWNER, WAUKEGAN- 2- 

story 5-bedroom home. Liv- 
ing room, formal dining 
room, 2-car garage, large 
fenced-in backyard on North- 
side. $80,999, lor appoint- 
menl. (708) 623-0446. 

BY OWNER- "ROCHESTER 

Twrohp. Country Aires Sub- 
division. All brick ranch, 3- 
bedroom, 2-baths, large 
kitchen/ dining area, living 
room with stone flreplace- 
llooMo-celllng, central air, 
concrete drive and patio, at- 
tached 2.5car garage. 6yrs. 
old. By appointment only! 
$146,900 (414) 534-6832, 
artoMpm. 

DRAKE VILLA, ROCK LAKE. 
Now 3-bedroom 2-story 
house, wilh lovely scenic 
view, 2.5ba)hs, carpeting, lull 
basement, 2-car attached 
garage, pal to. allowance lor 
appliances. Blacktop drive- 
way. Immedlale possession. 
Lawn In. $149,000 (708) 
546-9511 or 

(708)487-1723; 



BY OWNER- WINTHROP 
HARBOR. 4yr.old, 4-bed- 
room, 2.5balh, 2-ato»y. For-,, 
ma! living and dining room, 
family room, fireplace, large 
kflchen, 2-decks, attached 2-i 
car garage, lull basement. 
2700-1 oth SI. For appoint- 
ment can (708) 872-7168. 

CAROL BEACH, BY OWN- 
ER. 3-bedroom, 2-balh, 
raised. ranch with large family 
room and study. Can. see 
Lake Michigan, $124,000 
(414) 694-0845. 

DISCOVER YOUR AMERI- 
CAN DREAMI Is the rising 
. cost of housing keeping you 
from I ho American Dream of 
owning a home? Then you 
may want to consider choos- 
ing a modem manufactured 
homo. For more information 
call the Illinois Manufactured 
Housing Assoc, at 1/800- 
252-9495, YOU CANT AF- 
FORD NOT MAKE THIS 
CALLl \ 

DOOR COUNTY. HOME- 
Enjoy the 4 seasons In your 
own 3-bedroom home. New 
carpeting, freshly remodeled 
bathroom; knotty pine Interi- 
or; attached garage with 
broezway to house; situated 
on 3/4 wooded acre, walking 
distance to Bailey's Harbor, 
beach, shopping and line 
restaurants. "A Must See'! 
$64,900. Days- (708) 
244-4484, or (708) 

838-0444 .QVes. 

GRAYSLAKE- H ARYAN 

FARMS. 4-bedroom, 

2.5balh. 2-car garage; cen- 
tral air, lull basement, cus- 
tom window treatments, pro- 
fessionally landscaped. 
Priced-to-Setl! Move- In 
Ready) $209,900. (708) 
223-4640, by owner. 



Case No. 93 C 6282 
Judge Nordberg 



JW 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

EASTERN DIVISION, 

BankAmerica National Trust Company (New 
York), f/k/a Security Pacific National Trust ■ 
Company (New York), as Trustee, 

Plaintiff, 
VS. 

Stanblaw Murman and Jadwiga Murman, 
Transamerica Financial Services, Expert 
Construction Co., Inc. and Oakdlfle 
Homeowners Association, 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

QUB FILE NQ, 25737 

<TT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on February 10, 1994 

I, Alan Mills, Special Commissioner for this court will on June 
8, 1994 at the hour of 1 :30 pm at the front door of Lake County 
Courthouse, 18 N. County St., Wauk&gan, Illinois, sell to the 
highest bidder for cash, the following described premises: 
24522 N. Kelsey Road, Barrington, IL 60010 

The Improvements on the property consist of single family, 
wood frame, two story dwelling with a separate garage., 

Sale Terms; 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property win NOT be open lor Inspection. 

The judgment amount was $227,735.05. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Receipt of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law, 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. 1o 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer is DQl required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

EASTERN DIVISION 

MIDLAND MORTGAGE CORP, a(n) Florida 

PLAINTIFF, NO. 92 C 8045 

VS- Judge Nordberg 

LINNELL WEBSTER, CARRIE NORRIS, 
ROBERT WATKINS. LJ. CAWTHON, 
DEFENDANTS. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SAL E 

(IT B ADVBED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OJU ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on March 4, 1994, 

I, Alan Mils, Special Commissioner tor this Court, will on June 
8. 1994 at the hour of 1:30 p.m. at the Iron! door of the Lake 
County Courthouse. 18 North County St., Waukegan, Illinois tell 
(o the highest bidder for cash, the following described real estate 
and personal property: 
Commonly Known as 568 Sunderlin Street, Waukegan, IL 60085 

P.I.N. 08-26-1 19-038 .,. . .., 

The. Improvements of the property are as follows: TWO 
STORY, ASBESTOS SHINGLE, THREE UNITS WITH ; NO 
GARAGE. 

The property Is not open tor inspection. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, subject to Interest, certified funds made payable to Special 
Commissioner Alan Mils. The subject property Is to be offered for 
sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of tile or 
recourse to plafntltl. . 

Upon sale being made and (he purchaser tendering said bid In 
cash or certified funds, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of 
Sale which will be Issued as required, which will entitle the pur- 
chaser to a Special Commissioner's Deed and Bill of Sale upon 
court confirmation of the sale. 

Pursuant to S15-1507(c)(7> of the Iblnols Code of CM) 

ft ^™' "S Wormalton other than the Information contained In 
this Notice will be provided. 



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May 6, 19?4 LaIceIancJ Newspapers CLASSIFIED 





FOX GROVE TOWN- 
HOMES. WHY RENT? • 
Cheaper to own! Low as 
$3,0007down. 4035-28th 

Avo,,i8. Kenosha, 3food- 
rooms i.5baihs, remodeled, 
central air, $61,900. Model 
Open Saturday and Sunday 
1pm 5pm. (414)658-2525. 

GRAYSLAKE 3-flEDROOM 
2-balh, Tri-leve! on 1/2 acre. 
Large ■ kitchen,' extra ■ large 
deck, $140,900 (708) 
223-2637. 

GRAYSLAKE- BY OWNER- 
Engilsh Meadows. Charming 
Victorian home In Idea) neigh- 
borhood. 3-bedroom, 2.5 
baths, fireplace, premium 
lot. Plenty of extras. Bu 111 In 
1992. Must Sell, Moving to 
NEW Home. $157,900/best 
otter. Call for more Informa- 
tion I (708)546-1648, 

GURNEE- BY OWNER- 2- 
BEDROOMS, 2-full baths, 2- 
car garage. Excellent condi- 
tion, great location. Must 
see to appreciate. $128,000. 
, (708) 263-5149. 

JOHNSBURG- RIVER 

RIGHTS. 2-bedroom, year 
old raised ranch. Lower level 
possibilities. i.Scar garage. 
Central air. Many upgrades. 
Contract possible. $ 10 9 l 00 
$127,900. (708) 526-6306. 

JUST REDUCED WAU- 
CONDA, by owner, 2 bed- 
rooms, 2 baths, 1 car attached 
.' garage In Crestview Estates 
Development. Downstairs end 
jr.lt." Adjacent to forest pre-, 
servo. Close to schools. 
churcn, shopping and Banks 
Lake. Home has walk-In clos- 
ets, many upgrades, all appli- 
cances slay. Must sell! 
$92,500(706)487-1647 

LAKE GENEVA AREA- 3- 
bedroom, 2-bath brick home 
on 1-1/3acres. Features 
walk-out basement, 2-car at- . 
tached garage and satellite 
dish. (414) 248-7214. 



KENOSHA SOUTH SIDE, 

Whlttler Heights Sub. 6545- 
54th Ave. Brick ranch, main- 
tenance free, 3-bedroom. 
2.5balh, vaulted celling front- 
room with fireplace, central 
air, dining room, large- eat-In 
kitchen, finished basement 
with large wet-bar, 3-car ga- 
rage, shed. Situated on a 
large lot with mature trees on 
a quiet dead-end street. By 
owner. (414)694-1197. 

KENOSHA Wl- 11220- 
3RD Ave. 1 year old beautKui 
home, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 
living room, dining room, eat- 
In kitchen, famly room with 
. gas fireplace, 2,000 sq. ft. plus 
full basement, 2 car attached 
garage, vinyl siding, beautiful 
decks, lake view. $139,000. 
(414)694-9621. Open House 
Sat and Sun., 1-5, east off 
Sheridan Rd. on 116th St., 
north on 1st Ave., west on 
11 01 h St., south on 3rd. 

KENOSHA- 27TH AVE., 
6817- 3 level brick flat, 2 apart- 
ments occupied, upper level 2 
bedroom, Irving room, dining. 
room and kitchen. Lower has 
2 bedroom, living room, dining 
room, kitchen' and deck. 2 car 
garage. Sunporch on all 3 lev- 
els. Completely remodeled. 
#135,000. Serious buyers 
only. (414)652-2401.- 

KENOSHA- YESTERVEAR 
REVISITED IN THIS Lovely 
Brick Bungalow. One-of-a- 
kind Custom buirt l.623sq.tt. 
1 -story, 7 /room house wtth 
large expandable attic, en- 
closed front , porch, , and fire- 
place. Close "to 'downtown 
and lake. Only $85,900. 
Owner broker. (414) 
657-1087. 

LINDENHURST- 6-ROOM. 
BRICK cottage. Appraised 
price $200,000. (708) 
265-1510. 



Mchenry- raised ranch. 

2-bedroom with lower level 

possibilities! 2-car garage, 

drop lace, deck, energy eflfe- 

clent. Many upgrades! River 

rights. DEAL DIRECT With 

BUILDER, 

$127.900. (706) 526-8306. 

MUNDELEIN- BY OWNER. 

Cedar Sided Contemporary- 
Tullamore subdivision 3-4 
large bedrooms (loft), celling 
fans/lights In all, 2-full baths, 
and 2-1/2 baths, family room. 
dining room, formal Irving 
room with vaulted celling, 
targe kitchen wtth eating area, 
oak trim and crown moulding 
and 6 panel doors throughout, 
oak tongue and groove en- 
I ranee way, 2-unlque fire- 
places, finished basement. 
Park and pool In vicinity. 
$237,500 Reduced to 
$227,000 Good Through 
May 8th. Hippy Mothefe 
Dayl (708) 9*9-5437. 



Read then 
Recycle 



w 



TREVOR/. CAMP LAKE- 
2671 4-1 04lh Place. For Sate 
By Owner- charming, 2 bed- 
room newty remodeled start- 
er. Nice yard, In quiet subdivi- 
sion. Three blocks to park and 
beach. $69,500. 

(815)675-6073. 



WADSWORTH, 3-bedroom 
2.5bath, 1/acre. Wtth 2.5car 
garage, huge basement, 
central air, 2/decks and 
much moret Also new car- 
pet, custom curtains, and se- 
curity system. Located on 
quiet cul-de-sac 5-mlnute's 
from Gumee Mills and toll- 
way. Must See To Appreci- 
ate. $189,000. Days 
(708)480-5238, or eves, 
(708) 623-1265. 

WADSWORTH- BY OWNER- 

Counrly Irving with easy ac- 
cess to toliways and shop- 
ping. 2/story cotemporary, 4- 
bedroom, 2Jbath; large spa- 
clous house on 1/acre. Many 
additional features. 

$241,200 (708) 855-^227. 



WANTED: 3-bedroom 
$60,000 or less In Chain 
area. Condition unimportant. 
City sewer/water required. 
Seller most be wflflng to hold 
10% of purchase price as 
2nd mortgage. Balance at 
closing. Call (708)861-9916. 
Principals onry I 

WAUKEGAN, 2-BEDROOM 
CAPE Cod style, hardwood 
floors, fireplace, dining room, 
study/office, screened-In 
porch, full basement. 
$66,000. 611 Lewis Ave. 
(708)395-8961. 

WAUKEGAN, NORTHSIDE- 
4-BEDROOM, 2-baths, 

i.Scar attached garage, 
wooded ravine lot. Many 
new features. Large family 
room/dining room. $99,900. 
(708)317-2244, Chris. 



YOU CAN OWN YOUR OWN 
HOME! No downpayment on 
Miles materials, attractive 
construction financing. Call 
Milo3 Homes today- 1/800- 
343-2864, OXt.1. 

ZION- 3-bedroom 1-bath, 
brick ranch wtth attached ga- 
rage, walk-up attic, (4lh-bed- 
room) fireplace, on large ma- 
ture lot. Close to golf course, 
$89,900. (708) 872-1255. 



504 



Homes For Rest 



(2)1 -BEDROOM UNITS AND 
(1) 2-bedroom. Appliances. 
Adults. No pets, references 
required. McHenry, on the 

Chain. (815) 344-3944, 



Check this 

Section Each 

Week!! 



/ 




SPRING GROVE 

New all brick, 2 story, large corner landscaped lot. 4 
bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, 3 car garage, living room, dining 
room, deck, full basement, fireplace, whirlpool, first 
floor utility room, concrete driveway, paving brick side- 
walk. 2,500+ sq. ft. Ready for occupancy. 

$209,000 
(414) 321-8892 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
U.S. Bancorp Mortgage Company, 

Plaintiff, . Case No. 93 C 5559 

VS. Judge Duff 

Edward Kwasniewskl and Nancy 
KwasnlewsW , United States of America, John 
W. Carlson and Linda I. Carlson 
Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OURFILEN0.2S6B1 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on January 20, 1994. 

I, Robert Seneschal te , Jr., Special Commissioner lor this court 
will on June 14, 1994 at the hour of 8:30 am at the front door of 
the Lake County Courthouse, 18 U. County, Waukegan, Illinois, 
sell to the highest bidder tor cash, the following described 
premises: 

516 Linden Dr., Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 
The Improvements on the property consist of "single family, 
wood frame, one and a haK stories with a separate garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 

hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 

general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was $88,276.53. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser win receive a 

Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 

specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 

Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 

4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 

Officer Is Q2l required to provide additional Information other than 

that set forth in this Notice. 






Am c»'k«» Dream 



J IIJJJLLX 
iJStjDonnjDriiq 



Whitney 



*7©,900 

(on your lot) 

(shown with optional «**■■#«> 

We take special tttontion to detail, and if 
you'd like to add your special touch to any 
bade plan, it's no problaml Every home Is 
built by expert craftsman and only with name 
bran d product s. 

Compare then etandard feature* : 

• 12* ol R38 celling Insulation 

• 2x6 exterior waits R-20 stand ard 

• Ceilings and interior wall i are gypsum board 

• Maintenance (rat vinyl tiding, standard 

• Cedar or other tidings, optional 

Welcome 
Home 

TO OVER 90.000 
FAMILIES 



—is 




•Gas forced lir hut 

• PaschtPM Irautated metal dad antrance door 

•Tr*rmal»«rfwWo«**frMinler*rK«tree 
exterior obd wrappings 



lOMtlv, 



Pries does rot Incbde permte, survey and engi- 
neering bt clearing sewer and water or septic 
and well, culverts, driveways, wafcs, awdtcap- 
incj or riranrinfl. (These and other sia lirorove- 
menta avaiabls. Lower lavsk on BUaveit and 
TrMawfenXfinattsd}, 



li]lM>fIJ; 



COUNTY LINE B 

216 Janet Drive Island lake 
708-526-8306 



TRIPLE "A" BUILDERS 

34390 N. Rte. 45 Lake Villa 
708-223-7900 



OVERAU. WMEMSWHS iT-V X W-ff 
LIVING. 16» tqu*n IMI 
GAHA6E 6» lquvt <*tl 



REVENA 



The Revena shows what a little modesty can do. This 1600 square-loot home offers three good 
sized bedrooms, two and a half baths, a living room wtth a wood stove, a dining room, eating bar, 
and spacious country kitchen. 

How does It all lit? Moderation In all things. The master suite In the Revena has Us own bath, van- 
ity and walk-In closet, but no raised spa or private study. The kitchen's eating bar faces the dining 
room, and a desk for keeping bills all In one place Is snugty set between them. The utilities share a 
hall with a hatf-balh by the Wtchen. A pocket door separates the two and an extra deep utility sink Is 
conveniently close, ' 

The room arrangement b uncomplicated, wtth the entrance at the middle of the single main hall. 
Bedrooms are to the left, living areas to the right. This arrangement affords minimal noise forthe light 
sleepers and yet sllll offers room to ptay tor the children. 

The garage forms an V wtth the main house, wflh the main roof pitched slightly higher. This 
allows extra clearance for roof extensions over the covered entry and the bedroom bay windows. 

By not giving any part ol the house unnecessary luxuries, the Revena provides a home that Is 
comfortable throughout, despite Its modest size. Brick work along the outside, bottom edge of this 
house adds a pleasant touch, enhancing the exterior. 

The garage easily accommodates two cars with space for lawn equbment. A handy workbench 
b within easy reach lor those with hobbles or the backyard mechanic. Any oiled clothing heads for 
the washer Just Inside In the utility room, where the deep utility sink takes care ol personal cleanup. 

For a study kit of the REVENA (401-23), send $9,00. to Landmark Designs, P.O. Box 2307-LP60, 
Eugene, OR 97402 (Be sure to specify plan name & number)- ?° T a collection of plan books featur- 
ing Uandmari^smostpopulart^ 



FOX LAKE, 2 bedroom 
house, $625 per month, pay 
own utilities, security deposit 
required. Located near Fox 
Lake. (70S) 587-2622 After 
4pm.. - 

FOX LAKE- NEW Large 4- 
bedroom home, 2.5baths, 
large kitchen Including ap- 
pliances, basement, walking 
distance to lake. 
5995/month -tutittftles. +se- 
curtty deposit. (708) 
587-6768. 

GRAYSLAKE, ENERGY EF- 
FICIENT Duptox wtth single 
attached garage, 3-bed- 
rooms, 2-baths, central air, 
5900/monlh -futilities +de- 
postt. NO PETS! (708) 
587-6S03. 

GUREE. GRAND AVE. 2- 

bedroom duplex, carpeted, 
basement, nice back yard. 
5595/month +depsott +utlll- 
tles. (708) 623-4479. 




OPEN HOUSE- SAT. ft SUN. 
1-4PM. 5744 DELAWARE, 
GURNEE. 3-Bedroom town- 
home, 1.5bath. 1-car at- 
tached garage, freshly paint- 
ed, neutral decor, move-In 
condition. Si 17,500. (708) 
249-5267. 



TWIN LAKES AREA ON 1/2- 
ACRE. "OPEN HOUSE'- 
Sun. 5/8, 1-4pm. 5600- 
352nd Ave. (Hwy.KD) 3-bed- 
room 2-bath huge kitchen, 
1st floor laundry, finished 
basement. $147,500 Great 
commuting location. Hwy.SO 
west to Hwy.KD, north 
1/4-mile. (414)537-4725. 

OPEN HOUSE, SAT.* SUN. 
12-4pm. BEACH PARK. Re- 
duced! Bright and spacious 
home, courtry selling. 3-bed- 
rooms, 2baths, Gre&. rccn' 
with fireplace, finished base- 
ment, tot: 270x120. (708) 
336-2886. 




What's New 
On the Market 



Mortgage Money 

Bad Credit ft Late Pays OK 

• Must be employed 
No income verification loans. 
Small Business loans available. 
Call Now - Let* Talk! 

Delta Mortgage 

(708) 541-5300 or 

1-800-573-2233 

III. roider.tiiJ mortgage licensee 



RESORT SALE 

Cabin Resort Bait shop, 3 
bdrm house, 11 cabins. 9.75 
acs. 900' channel frontage. 
A+ location on Hwy 173. 
Super development, oppty. 
Owner financing avail. 

$425,000 

Lakcfront Resort. 16 apts, 
40 boat slips, 24 RV spaces, 
50-seat bar, gas pumps, 
more. Year round cash flow. 
3.75 acs. 400' lake frontage. 
Owner financing avail. 

$725,000 

United National 

Real Estate 

(815) 568-1407 



""t*4*M' 



• 



V'l 




1 CLASSIFIED Ukel ancI Newspapers May 6, 1994 



»4 

'• 

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p 



•mm n * 



■ * 
1 



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504 



Homes For Rent 



LAKE VILLA, 3-bedroom 

with appliances, central air, 
heatod 2car garage. Lako 
rights- . private lake, 
SBOO/month ^security. Avail* 
able May 1st. (708) 
356-8691. 

RENT WITH OPTION- Wau- 
conda, In-law arrangement, 
(2) separate 1, 7O0sq.lt living 
areas, $1 ,700/month +securi- 
ly •deposit. f708) 526-3923. 

RENT- 2-BEDROOM BRICK 
ranch Duplex near down- 
town Antioch. Available June 
1st. No pets. 5650/month 
+securlly. (708} 395-8099, 
leave message. 

WAUCONDA, 2 BED- 
ROOM house for rent. 919 
Sheridan Drrvo, Lakevlew Villa 
$600 Month (815) 459-5480 

WAUKEGAN, NORTHSIDE, 
GOOD location, 3-bedroom 
trl-level, 1.5bath, new kitch- 
en appliances. Large rec 
room, utility room, 2.5car ga- 
rage. $950/month. IMME- 
DIATE. (708)360-0538, 
leave message and phone #, 
for appointment. 

ZfON- 4-bedroom Ranch, 
2fuii bath, basement, 

Fenced yard. No pets. 
S800/monlh +1 month de- 
posit. Move-In NOW! Sec- 
tion 8 not available. Call 
after. 4pm ONLYI (708) 
872-1603. 



RENTALS! RENTALS!) 

NOW OVER 700 LISTINGS 
NEW LISTINGS DAILY 

ACCURATE 

2414 GRAND AVE. 

WAUKEGAN, IL 
(708) 244-2511 



508 


Homes Wanted 



RESPONSIBLE MOM 
SEEKS 2-3 bedroom house 
or apartment In Gray slake 
area. Job transfer returns us 
back to Grayslake. 
(312)685-6544, eves. 

WANTED - HOME with SmaT 
Acreage. Responsible Ve- 
terinarian with 2/Dogs and 2 
Horses wishes to Rent With 
Option to Buy. Please Call 
(708) 885-6075. 

STOP FORECLOSURE- ARE 
YOU FACING BANKRUPT- 
CY- DIVORCE- PROBATE- 
UNEMPLOYMENT. We Buy 
House*. We Loan Money. 
All Cash or Terms. Feat 
Settlement, Scott: (708) 
945-8235. 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



BY OWNER TOWNHOME. 3- 

bedroom 1.5bath, end unit, 
new kitchen, finished base- 
ment, Gumee schools. 
$81 ,900 (708) 244-31 1 5. 

BY OWNER- Round Lake 
Beach- 3-bedroom town- 
home, 1.5bam, attached ga- 
rage, central air, stove refrig- 
erator, dishwasher. Low as- 
soc. fee. Pool/tennis, Walk 
to shopping, close to Metre. 
Excellent bond* ton, Own for 
less than rentl No Agents. 
$68,000, leave message. 
(708) 546-7020. 

DELUXE 2 BEDROOM 

Condo on Lake Michigan 
Shoreline $950 Month (414) 
658-3278 Ask for Bob. 

FOX LAKE 2-bedroom town- 
home, 1.5bath, all applianc- 
es Included. Washer/dryer. 
Pay own utilities. 

$695Anonth ^security. Avail- 
able Nowl Management Spe- 
clalHs, (708) 587-5250. 

GRAYSLAKE- 2-bedroom 

townhome, all appliances, 
central air with Pool. Avail- 
able Maylst. $650/morth 
-►security, (708) 356-8891 . 



514 



Condo/Town 
Homes 



GURNEE- 3-bedroom, loll, 
2.5bath, don, olllce, 2. Scar 
garago, finished basement, 
dock, window treatments, 
neutral decor, central air- 
lore od heat, fireplace, wash- 
er/dryer, stove, dishwasher, 
rolrtgeralor. Many nice ex- 
tras) GREAT LOCATION. 
S154.900. (708) 360-9700, 
Jim Page. 

VERNON HILLS- 2-BED- 
ROOM condo, 1.5bath with 
washer/dryer. Located In 
New Century Town. 
$740/month. Includes heat, 
water. Available now. (70S) 
680-7379. 



518 


Mobile Homes 



$500 REBATE! 2bodroom. 
14x60. Alt appliances Includ- 
ing microwave, Central air, 
10x10 dock. Aprox. 
$165/month. Located: 
N.A.S.GLENVIEW Book 
Price: $13,000, asking 
$12,000 then $S00-Reb«tel 
Must be moved. (708) 
729-5206. 

3-BEDROOM, 2-bath, 1990, 
14x80, central air. Approved 
lor Navy lot. Small Down pay- 
ment and Take Over Pay- 
ments, aprox. $275/month. 
(708)689-2302, alter 5pm, 
days- (7Q8)688-^290(wk). 

MOBILE HOME- 1974 Royal 
Coach, 12x65. 2-bedroom, 
new windows and storms 
throughout, central air, stack- 
able washer and dryer, ap- 
pliances, awning porch, . 
shod, steps and storage 
area, very good condition, 
$7,500/negollable. (815) 
344-1493, after 6pm. 

MOBILE HOMES- SINGLE 
and Doubles. 2-3 bedrooms. 
Lake County and Kenosha 
County. Bank loans and ap- 
pralsals. (70B) 662-1965. 

MODULARS* 'DOUBLE- 
WIDES *SINGLEWIDES 

•2/STORY Model On Dis- 
play I 'Foundations 'Base- 
ments* Garages 'Wells 
■Septics... We do It AIM Free 
Statewide Delivery/set- up. 
RILEY MANUFACTURED 
HOMES. 1/800/796-1 S41. 

ROUND LAKE- 14x70. Front 
Kitchen, 2-bedroom, all ap- 
pliances stay. Very clean, 
set on large lot. Vacant. 
$17,900 10% down, Bank Fl- 
nandng. (708) 662-1965. 

************ 

* JOBTRANSFERI * 

* 14x70, 2bdrm, front* 

* kitchen, fireplace, stove, * 

* ref, waiher/dryer, window * 

*air.Sl4.500/best. * 

* ^|^"o -jreiio^Hi * 

£3bdrm, 14x70, 1 .5ba, ^ 
^■tove, ref, washer/dryer, £ 
jlC/A, large shed, set on a 
I large lot. Priced to Sellll 
£$13,S00/best. Goodr 



'Clean condition I 



* ADULT ONUf- * 

£ NOPCTPARX £ 
J Lovely 2bdrm, 14x70* 
J front Wtohen, C/A, carport, * 
*shed. Beautiful Park. * 

* Curt om built. Estate Sate - * 

* $16,500. J 

*U$imtii's Homes* 

£ M-FWpm/SaLMpm * 
J (701)662-1965 J 
************ 



518 


Mobile Homes 



SHULTZ- 1987 14x72. 3- 

bedroom, 2- large baths, 
shingled roof, vinyl siding, 
central air, gas heat, window 
treatments and major ap- 
pliances Included. Fenced 
lot, 8x10 shed, $22,500. 
(708) 473-1825 MUST SEE 
TO APPRECIATE! 

USED I 

S MOBILE HOMES 9 



i 




520 



Apartments For Rest 



2-BEDROOM Iroshly paint- 
ed, new carpel, laundry facili- 
ty. $580/month. No pets. 
(706) 872-6698. 

CLEAN LOWER LEVEL Du- 
plex basement, 2/enclosed 
porches, stove, refrigerator, 
parking. Own utlttles. No 
pets. (708) 662-6703. 

FOX LAKE, 2-BEDROOM 
townhome In Vacation Vil- 
lage. Pool, tennis, etc. Imme- 
dlale. 1/800-334-7348. 

GRAYSLAKE- 2-bedroom 
apartment with balcony, 
freshly decorated, adutls pre- 
ferred, lyr. lease, security 
deposit, no pels. 

S595/monih. (708) 

729-3767. 

GURNEE- 2-BEDROOM 1st 

floor In Cape Cod home. 
Near Warren High School, 
stovo, refrigerator, fenced 
yard, Gargage parking, No 
pels. References and securi- 
ty deposit, lyr. lease. (708) 
295-17SB. 

ISLAND LAKE- 2-BED- 
ROOM, 2-bath apartments. 
Large eat- In kitchen. Starting 
at $625/month (708) 
304-6786. 

LAKE BLUFF- 1AND 2-bed- 
room apartments. Poot, rec 
room. $540-$660/monlh. In- 
cludes heat. (708) 615-9717. 

LAKE BLUFF AREA- 2-bed- 
room apartment In security 
building, off street parking, 
storage. $525/month. (708) 
689-0557.- 

LAKE BLUFF- AVAILABLE 

5/1. 1 -bedroom overlooking 
pool, $590/month; Includes 
heal. Very quiet property In 
woods, with pool. (708) 
577-3636. 

LAKE VILLA, LARGE 2 bed- 
room apartment, laundry 
facility, beach rights, heat In- 
cluded, $620/month. 
(708)356-9112. 

LAKE VIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Large 1+2- 
bedroom apartments. Lake 
Vila. $535 and $6707month. 
Heal water, air Included. 
(708)356-5474. 

LIBERTYVILLE 2 AND 3 
bedroom apartments, with al 
appliances $700 and $775 
Call (708)249-2040 or 
(708)362-4776. 



Huny In Or You'll Miss Out! 

Our final Phase HI is filling FAST. 

Stop in and select your NEW HOME. 

Great selection - custom homes our specialty! ! 

Discover AFFORDABLE LUXURY UVING. 

Homes from $30s. ■ 

Pioneer Estates 

OF LAKE GENEVA, WI 

414-248-3831 

(2 ml. south onHwy R> 





520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



MUNDELEIN- 2-BEDROUM 
APARTMENT, newer ap- 
pliances and carpeting, laun- 
dry. $570/monlh +Securlty 
deposit. (70S) 834-2100. 

NORTH CHICAGO- 1-BED- 
ROOM apartment. 1313 Lin- 
coln. Furnished. $400/month 
+socurlty. (706) 785-1815. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH area- 

1. bedroom, secure building, 
stove, refrigerator, water and 
heat are furnished. Pay own 
electric. $495/month. (708) 
740-02BO. 

UNION GROVE, WI. 2-bed- 
room apartments. FREE heat. 
New carpet. Coiling Fan. Mini 
blinds. Close to schools. No 
pets. From $490/month. (414) 
678-^809. 

WATERFRONT- 1-BED- 

ROOM MODERN apartment, 
carpeted, laundry, oil-street 
parking. 31 S.PIstakee Lake 
Rd„ Fox Lake. $S50/monlh, 
Includes heat, cooking gas. 
(708) 382-7318. 

WAUCONDA- 2 BED- 
ROOM apartment, newly 
decorated. Stove, refrigerator, 
heat and hot water Included. 
$550/rnonlh. Lease and secur- 
ity deposit. No pels, yard. 
Available Immediately. 

(70B)433-0891. ' 

WAUKEGAN LARGE 1 Bed- 
room 1st Floor, private en- 
trance, carpeted, appliances, 
furnished, freshly decorated, 
garage parking, drive by 11 
Jefferson $426 plus security 
For appointment call (708) 
336-8619 Sam or Ruth. 

WAUKEGAN- 2 BEDROOM. 

cottages, Victorian - setting, 
off street parking. Available 
now. S650-$750/month. 

(708) 336-Ot44. 

WAUKEGAN- NORTHSIDE, 
1-BEDROOM, lower level, 
$450/month; Includes all utili- 
ties. STUDIO $390/month 
Heat included. No pels. 
(708) 336-2400. 

WAUKEGAN- MODERN 1- 
BEDROOM In quiet well- 
managed security building. 
$425/monlh. 
(708)662-4487. 

ZION- SPACIOUS 2-BED- 
ROOM apartment. Laundry, 
off-street parking, 

55 2 5 /mo nth Includes heat. 
(708)731-3805. 



LIBERTYVILLE- SPACIOUS, 
2-BEDROOM, hardwood 
floors, air conditioning, 
5660/monih -fsecurlty. (70S) 
549-7708. 

MUNDELEIN- RTS. 45*176. 
Bright, 2-bedroom apart- 
ment, quiet residential area, 
4- unit building. Ideal for quiet 
mature persons. Central air, 
appliances, carpeted, laun- 
dry, storage. Close to Motor- 
ola. $650. Available June 
1st, and August 1st. No 
pets. (708) 566-9527. 




MUNDELEIN 

Spacious, lovely 2 S/ C\ 
F bedroom apartments. y 
£> Secure building, i 

lanager on premises. JU 
Laundry facilities, w 
Available immediately..-^. 
Minutes to shopping; xv 

CALL 

(708)566-2700 



WUIWIND VIUACE 
APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave. Zlon 
RENTING FROM $495 

Appliiiico - Custom Blinds 

On-iite Muuger 

Note 

CsllRki orDUmt mt 

(708) 731-1«04 

0f NaT rffftTTY MMWft9t^ 

(414) 6?7g6l6 

t£i. 



************ 

* Ingieslde * 

t **499. 00 { 

* pays 1st mo. rent & deposit * 

* an * 

* One Bedrooms * 

5 •Spacious £. 

J •Prhrite BikoniH J 

* 'Short term Imms avail. ^ 

J Lakeview } 
J Apartments * 

* (708) 587-9277 * 

if 'quMtd tpfUcand, 1 yr ton* £ 
************ 



•Microwave Ovens 

•Dishwashers 

•Washers & Dryers 

•Vaulted Ceilings 

•Patios or Balconies 

•Convenient Location 

(708) 356-0800 

705 Water's Edge Dr. 

Lake Villa, IL 

On Route 132 (Grand 

Ave.). Just east of Route 

83 at the south side of 

Deep Lake 

Prof$$*Jontity 
^\^ mtnag$dby 
TjJJJ Uan»gem*nt 

fleifty Pirtntn 



IV 



H 



Antloch's 

linesi 2 bedroom 

apartments. 

V bath of 1 1/2 baths. 

'Balcony or patio. 

Extra storage. 

No Pats. 

Ask about senior 

citizen incentives 

Military clause. 

Rent «m.+ sec. 

;, (708) 838*0655; 

Anita 



Q Terrace p 

teji,i?JB 



All -real estate advertising in 
this newspaper is subject to 
the Fair' Housing Act of 1968 
which makes it illegal to 
advertise any preference, 
limitation or discrimination 
based on race, color, 
religion, sex, handicap, 
lamiiial status or national 
origin, or an intention to 
make any such preference, 
limitation or dsenmination. 



Gl 



Water's Edge Apartments 

•FREE Gas heating/cooking & water 
•Spaciously designed i&2 bdim apartments 
•Fully equipped picture window kitchen 
•Central air •Scenic country setting 

250S.Rt.59 

Fox Lake 

(708) 587-8888 




528 



Apt/Homes 
To Share 



/PEBBLESHIRE 
PHASE! 

Spacious, modem 1 & 2 bdrm 

apts from 9873 

FREE heat & cooking gas. 

•PLUSH CARPETING 
•MODERN APPLIANCES 
•LAUNDRY FACILITIES IN 
EVERY BUILDING 
•ON SITE MAINTENANCE 
MINUTES FROM 
HAWTHORN CENTER 

708-367-4504 

^695 Westmoreland P i: 




FEMALE PREFERRED TO 
SHARE spacious apartment, 
near downtown Antioch. 
Must be clean, honest and 
responsible, $365/month in- 
cludes utmiea. 1st/1ast. Stor- 
age space Included. Call 
Ron after 7pm. (708) 
395-8835. 

MATURE PERSON to share 
my home In exchange for part- 
time chHd care. Ages 8 and 
10. {708)336-9630 or 
' (708)623-9774. 

ROOMMATE WANTED TO 
SHARE large 3-bedroom, 2- 
bath house, NON-Smoker. 
$400-$450/month, Includes 
unities. M/F. (708) 
244-2247, ext.106. 

ROOMMATE TO SHARE- 2- 
bedroom house, Linden- 
hurst. Female preferred, 
S300/month (708) 265-0804. 

WILLING TO Snare Huge Li- 
brary Needed by June Norn 
Smoking, private person who 
colects llerature, music, clas- 
sical iMms, seeks 2 rooms and 
bath. Antioch to WlJmot area. 
WM give access to large li- 
brary and pay rent of $200- 
$250 per month. Call, Tom 
Wednesday, Thursday After 
8PM or Leave Message (708) 
395-8358 



530 



Rooms For Rent 



GRAYSLAKE- $100/wk In- 
cludes utilities. (708) 
249-5444. 

ROUND LAKE PARK- Room 
for rent. $225/month. No 
drinking/or drugs. Ideal for 
Mature male. (708) 
546-3295. 

Zlon- ROOMS AVAILABLE 
FULLY Furnished. . Effeclen- 
cys. 5/mlnutes to North 
Pt .Marina. Close lo transpor- 
tation. Dally, weekly, 
monthly rates . avallsble. 
-9797. 




Business Property 
For Rent 



FINISHED OFFICE BUILD- 
ING, Furnished If needed. 
Up lo 850sq.f1. Must see to 
appreciate. Grayslake. (708) 
223-4581. 

LIGHT INDUSTRIAL SPACE, 

2,ooosq.f!., Basement, 

zoned B2, Bristol, Wise. 
Easy access; waterproofed, 
3-phase power. Available, 
(414) B57-6692. 

OFFICE /STORE FRONT 
ROLLINS RD. I.OOOsq.ft. 
(708) 546-5221 or 

(708)546-4862. _^ 

WAUKEGAN- 4.000SQ.FT. 
WAREHOUSE or light manu- 
facturing plus 1,300sq.fl. of--, 
(ices. 4081 Joseph Dr. Right j 
off Detaney. Available bnme- 
rjatery. (708) 381-3866. . 

WOODSTOCK- INDUSTRIAL 

COMMERCIAL Buiidlng, 

5,200 sq.ft., 4O0amp., 
230vott9, 3pm power. Large 
overhead door, 20-ton 
closed loop tower system, 
Wired tor Manufacturing. I 
•Seven Phone, 6/llne AT&T 
system. Avalafce now. (815) 
338-8505. -.i " 



540 



Invesuaeni Property 



BY . OWNER- ZION. 
(3)RENTAL UNITS. Each 
has Own kitchen, baths; 
(1)poasfcle in-law attached 
cottage. $1 20,000. By ap- 
ilntment, (708) 746-2014. 



560 



Yacanl Lot/ Acreige 



1-1/2- ACRE LOT wlh Pond. 

Suitable walkout, wooded 
area. Oaks ol the Ho low, Off 
Rte.59 northeast of Rte.12, 
south of Fox Lake, $63,500. 
By owner (708) 587-5566. 

CRYSTAL LAKE. BEAUTI- 
FUL lots. Make an offer 2.35 
acre $78,000 1.25acre, 
$50,000 (708) 381-2821 . 

FOX LAKE- LARGE lot, end 
ol channel to Chain Olakes. 
Midst of single family 
homes, quiet cul-de-sac, ask- 
ing, $35,000 
(708)724-0058. 

ROUND LAKE AREA- 2- 

bulldable lots, Connecting, 
50x300 each. $33,000/both. 
Near Rollins and Fairfield. 
(708)546-3817. 

VACANT, WATERFRONT. 
4+ acres, Wll divide. North- 
em 2/acres; $45,000 or 
$10,000/down, 8% at 
$450/month. Southern 2/acr- 
es also available. (708) 
395-2042. 




JJOuKXAreaPropert) 



LAKE BARKLEY, COVE- 
FRONT Bargain. 2.76acre 
$24,900. This to your last 
chance to own gorgeous 
land hone of Lake Barkteya 
premier lakefront communi- 
ties. Easy access to I-24. 
County roads, water adn utlt- 
tles, Excellent financing. 
Don't miss oull Call Now 
1/600-858-1328. WOOD- 
LAND ACRES. 






" 





I Oat Of Ana 
Property 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles . 



710 



Boats/Motors/ 

etc 



TN, HUNTLAND 

Ideal home, business. Low Crime, 
Low Taxes. 4000 •.(.brick ranch 
w/lull basement, CM, gas heat, 
welt, grape vines, f rut Ireei, 3+ ao. 
2 worksnope/storege bkfgt, 2000 
i.J. ea. S160K. CcacMare for 2 
tefundod at closing. , 

Owner 704-825-6095 



OREGON'S UPPER 

WILLtAMETTE VALLEY 

2 ad} farms on quiet paved 
country loop, approx 17,5 ac 
ea. Current corp of xmas 
trees Is Ind'd In price 2200 si 
ranch. S300K or 2500 4 2 
story S250K or Both tor 
$500,000; 2 ml to 1-5, easy 
access to Intn'l airport, 6 ml to 
Salem, 35 ml to Portland. For 
Info call 503-390-8705 or 
eve/Wknd 503-930-0701 or 
Fax: 503/390-6706. 



VA. - Foot of Blue Ridge 
Mtns. Charming, unique 
estate. Georgian style 
main house, out-bldgs, 
38 acres wooded & clear. 
By Owner. 

804/589-3793 



IDAHO Home 

3 br, 2 1/2 bth on 11 act. 2200 i.l 
main fir, 1700 a.f. bsmt itucco 
exterior, tile roof, 2 dU garage* (1 

attached & 1 detached). Al appt'i 
Ind'd. Bit 1980. Airport, Smalt 
hosp, schis & churches. S26SK. 

Owner 208-253-4540 



NM QENTLEMANS 

RANCH RETREAT 

Southern NM, 300 ac, 5br 
home w/pool, secluded yet con- 
venient to town & schools, hors 
es allowed, great environment, 
S425.000. Thompson Land Co, 

1-800-687-2679 



CO, .. 440 ac. Beautiful 
prop. Good grazing 
potential. Old La Veta 
Pass on Hwy 160. X* 
Country ski cntr. 9000' 
etev. Nice log bldgs, 
water. $425K. Owner. 

915/893-2505 



NV, LAS VEGAS 

Low Crime , Low Taxes 4 or 
SBR, 2 2/3bth, 2265sf, tile, 
2fplcs, 2 kitchens, pool, 
R.V. parking, $155,500 
702/253-5069 Owner, or 
702/732-1112 Agtpp 



WA San Juan Island 

BeauL calm bit Home, pastoral viewt 
I park-Eke see, wrap-around deck, 
bfaAwoodwork thru-out, 2br $ matr 
iwte w/epa tub, 2 1/2bth. gourmet 
kit, aunkan LR, Irg wd stove, pond, 
fruit trees, tils rf, gar/shop + cabin 
S2S7K/hego. B4B Permit. 

206/378-4201 pp 



ARKANSAS 

Low Crime, No Flooding 
3BR house + 120 acs. 15 
miles So. El Dorado. Pine & 
Oak Wilderness. Timber & 
Oil Rights. Excellent 
Schools nearby. S140K rteg. 
210-741-2003 Owner. ' 



MT, • Historic Log Lodge w/2br 
apt/ofc, 22 rms, cocktail 

lounge, cabins, restaurant 
(adis. Gaming w/all beverage 
Hq. lie. avail. Between Missoula, 
Great Falls, Helena, Butte. 500 
ml. snowmobile trails, golf nrby, 
gov't grants avail. S385K OBO. 

406-362-4396 



OK, TULSA 

4800 sf home w/bsmt, 
pool, tennis court on 7 
3/4 ac. $350K. By Owner. 
Call 916/835-2007 for 
info & details. 



1979 AVION 34ft. Trt-axlo 
travel trailer, 5/awnlngs, rear 
bath, double bed, all extras. 
Must seel ALSO 1986' SUB- 
URBAN 3/4-ton, 454-englne, 
97,000/milos. BOTH: 

$13,500(708)740-7671. 

1984 23ft, Mini-Motor 
home, sleeps 4. Must sell, 
low- mllos. (708)546-1126, 
message/after 6pm or woo- 
kends. 

^"■■■■^■■■^SiBlBaBBBBBBBBBBBBie^Bae^Be^BeBBBa^PBBBBl^i^i^Be 

1984 MIDAS MOTOR. 
HOME 24\ Chevy 350, 
44,000 miles, cruise control, 
arn/Tm cassette, roof air, mi- 
crowave, TV, storage pod, ex- 
cellent' condition (708) 
356-94S4. 

MALLARD TRAVEL TRAIL- 
ER, 28fl. 1984, Mint condi- 
tion, lots of extras. Must sell 
AHer 6pm. (708) 367-7323. 

MOTOR HOMES FOR 

Rent- Make Reservations 
Early. Please call Days: 
(414)697-1311 or Eves: (414) 
694-4987. 

PALAMINO POP-UP TRUCK 

camper, Gas electric refrig- 
erator, gas furnace. Used 
8/llmes. $2,600. (JOB) 
244-1317. 



570 



Cemetery Lots 



HV CLOSEOUT! 

Jayco TV Trailer 

28 ft, 1 992 used once, 
steeps 6, fully loaded. $11,500 

"wXwUmS" 

1988 Travela Villa roofalc like 
new. 26 ft. hitch plate. S3, 500. 

LEHMAN'S 

(708)662-1965 



708 


Saownubiles/ATTs 


SNOWMOBILE- JET SKI 
AND PONTOON Trailers 
by Triton. , Beat prices, 
Dan's Surf and Turf 1- 
(800) 646-2744: 


710 


Boal/Motors/Etc 



BURIAL PLOT, (1) Diamond 
Lake Cemetery, Mundeteln. 
$250*est offer. Margie- 
(708) 290-2790 7am- 3pm. 

TWO DOUBLE CRYPTS at 
beautiful Wfndrfdge Park In 
Gary. Private owner leaving 
state. Save 30%. $11,200 
(815) 365-1641 

TWO SIDE-BY-SIDE COM- 
PANION Crypts, Mausoleum, 
lower terrace . at Highland 
Memorial Park. Value $8,600 
Wi sell both for $5,000(708) 
623-6773 



16ft. CRESTLINER Trl-Hull, 
excellent fishing boat 55hp 
Johnson Outboard with low 
hours. Spartan Trailer Includ- 
ed. $2,400 (708) 549-8602 
evenings of (706)356-0080 
days, Ask for Kurt. 

17 FOOT DEEP V Chrysler 
motor; 115 hp Chrysler Tmiu; 
Roller Balco. In excellent con- 
dition $4,200. negotiable 
(414) 539-2603 After 6 pm. 

17ft. V-HULL BOAT, thhlng 
decks, fish- Under, foot con- 
trol, trolling motor, 60hp 
Johnson, trailer, $1,300/best 
offer. (708) 546-2366. 

1957 STREBLOW. Mil. 
wooden boat, Cadillac V8 
engine, $2,500; SINGLE 
axle 18ft. traler, $300; 1860 
CENTURY 1611. Ski-boat, 
Grey-Marina V8, engine, 
$3,500. (706) 587-0691. 

1979 SCORPIAN INDICA- 
TOR Ski boat 115 hp Mercury 
motor, AM/FM stereo, new 
carpet, teakwood sides, excet- 
tem condition. $3,500 (708) 

658-1326. 

1983, RINKER, 21 ft Cuddy 
Cabin with trailer, fully load- 
ed, ready for Lake Michigan 
fishing. Many extras, 
$l0.500/negotlable. (615) 
365-1182. 

1988 14* ALUMINUM Fish- 
log Boat with Trailer, 25hp mo- 
tor, fish Under, live well, com- 
pass, spare tire, al hi excellent 
condition for $2,900 (708) 
336-9272 After 5pm 

40tt. RIVER Queen, Twin 
318 Chryslers, ffy bridge, 
dual controls, low hours. Will 
consider trade for late model 
pick-up truck or car. (708) 
887-0805,(708)655-0600. 

ANTIQUE CLASSIC WOOD 
Boat, 1950-55 Unknown 
age, 15H. veneer bottom, 
Mahogany plank deck, seats 
4, 30hp electric start In rear, 
over $5,000 Invested. Needs 
minor work, Asking 
$4,5004)081, motor and trail- 
er (708) 587-2418. 



BAYUNER 1979 14ft„ 1985 
75hp Chrysler, trailer, new. 
covor, battery. Trailer lights 
and with accessories. 
S2.5O0. (815)943-7658. , 

BOAT - 1974 Renell Day- 
cruiser; 1 88hp Mercrulser, 
fulfy enclosed convertlblo ca- 
bin, color sonar with speed 
and water temp, Marine 54 
channel radio with seek and 
scan, 2 Cannon downrlg- 
gers, 12 rod holders plus net 
. holder. EZ-Loader tandem 
trailer. Lake Michigan ready! 
Must sell. $3,500 (414) 
657-9328. 

BOAT LIFT $100.00 (708) 
587-0634. * . . , . 

BOAT LIFTS- ALL ALUMI- 
NUM BY TRITON- cano- 
pies, piers, 110 and 12 volt op- 
erators, check my prices. 
Dan's Surf and Turf. 
(600)646-2744. 

BOAT SLIPS AVAILABLE 
WITH ELECTRIC SHORE 
STATION on FOX LAKE. 
CALL (708) 356-2747. 

CARAVELLE ES 190, 1989, 
19.6ft. 175 MerCrulser, low 
hours, Shoreline trailer, Ex- 
cellent showroom condition. 
1/owner. $9,500 (815) 
358-0647. 

CENTURY CORTEZ 27ft., 
1980, 350 Chevy More, I/O. 
Loaded! Call for more de- 
tails. First $9,5O0/takes It. 
(815) 363-0807, ' or 
(815)477-3367. ■■_ 

CHRIS CRAFT 23ft. 1963 
Sea Skiff 195hp- 283 power 
trim tabs, Vee -berths, new 
cushions, covers, chrome. A 
Classic In great shape. With 
trailer, $ 10,500 (708) 
639-7222, weekdays. 

17ft. EBKO MONTE CARLO 
1986 (Fish and Ski) Open 
Bow, 115Mercuiy OB, excel- 
lent condition, $6,700 (706) 
680-3626. 

FOUNTAIN 1994 32ft. T-502. 
EFI'S 60hrs. Marry options; 
$98,000: wHI consider trade. 
(615) 672-2320. 

FOUR WINNS FREEDOM, 
1991, 19(1. Open bow, 
175hp I/O, Excellent condl- 
tlon. (706) 356-4260. 

JET SKI- KAWASAKI, 1989 
Model 550, high prefor- 
mance, very low hours, ex- 
cellent condttllon, 
$2,000/best otter 
(312)581-4997 ask for Tom, 
(708) 546-1361 , ask for Ed. 

LUND CABIN CRUISER, 
20fl. f/O, 165hp Mercury, 
1Shp Johnson holing motor, 
full equubmeflt +exlras! E-Z 
Loader trailer, $7,000/negoti- 
able. (708) 253-5903. 

LUND PRO V DELUX 1990, 
115hp Mercury, Tral Master 
trailer, many extras, Brand 
new condition. $11,000, 
Days: (708)829-4637, Eves: 
(706)719-9346. 

LUND- 1992 19ft. Prc-V De- 
luxe Merc 150, traler. Many 
extras. Must sect 
$17,500/best reasonable of- 
fer. (708) 934-6261. 

MARQUIS, 19ft, 1979 Cuddy 
Cabin. 170hp I/O. Very good 
condition. Boat Is In water for 
test drivel $4,500Vbesl (708) 
838-3231. 

PONTOON BOAT 1086 

Playcraft 20 loot removable fi- 
berglass top 50 hp Johnson 
outboard, Includes trailer 
$6,000 Shore station $1,000 
Days (708)662-8750 Even- 
ings (708)395-5034 or 
(708)587-2445. 

Pontoon boat, 1991. 

24 foot Sylvan, 75hp Suzuki, 
excelent condition, some ex- 
Iras. $6,800(815)344-3274.. 

PONTOON BOAT, 1983, Ja- 

macian Suncrulser 35 hp 
Evlnrude. Trailer and coast 
guard equipment Included. 
$9,000. (708) 473-4416. 

PONTOON BOAT- 24FT. 
400hp Johnson, Good cond- 
lion, $2.000 (708) 567-5630, 

SEA RAY 1917 270 Amber- 
lack. Twin 260 Mercury; full 
canvas, extras with 1968 
trailer, $35,000. (708) 
587-1707. * 



SAILBOAT- 14ft. Fiber- 
glass, Alcort, Force 5, $750. 
(708) 234-5570, 9am-5pm 
or (414)877-4511, week- 
ends. 

SEA RAY, 1974 22ft. Cuddy, 
225hp Mercury, I/O, trim 
tabs, E-Z Loader trailer, 4* 
down riggers, looks sharp, 
runs excellent, $5,500. (414) 
694-1720- . , . 

SEA RAY, 1992 20ft. Uke 
new, loss than 100/hours. 
$17,000. Leave message 
(708) 746-0409. 

SEA SPRITE 18FT. 1984. 

3.BLV6, 1B5hp, lull canvas, 
$5,300/llrm. (706) 487-0341. 

SHOREMASTER BOAT 

LIFT - Ant loch Instant Marine 
Docks, Floating Docks, ladory 
show room. (708) 838-3625. 

JET SKI, PONTOON, and 
snowmobile Trailer* by Tri- 
ton. Best prices, Dan's Surf 
and Turf H800) 646-2744. 

16ft. boat with trailer 1988, 
60hp VRO Johnson motor,. lit 
trim plus accessories. 
$2,300fcest. (708) 576-9206. 

TRI-HULL SEATING 

OPEN Bow 16ft. boat with 
traler 1988, eohp VRO John- 
son motor, til trim plus acces- 
sories. $2,300/best. (706) 
578-9206. 

TROJAN 1076 EXPRESS 

Cruiser 26ft. hardtop, galley, 
sleeps 5, Chrysler 225hp I/O, 
exellent condition. $14,900 
Serious inquiries only. (708) 
394-5368. 

WANTED- YOUR OLD BOAT 

(or 2/College students who 
want to spend their Free 
Time enjoying nature In- 
stead of drugs and alcohol. 
Must be Cheap or Free! Ask 
for Gary, (708)395-0415. 

WANTED: SMALL PEDDLE 
BOAT, Reasonabe price. 
Call after 5pm (708)546- 
9038. ' 

WAVERUNNERS- 1968 and 
1989 Yamaha 550cc with 
covers. $2,200 and $2,300. 
(708)587-1443. 

WELLCRAFT 1990, 215 
Eclipse, 22ft. open bow, 271 
Volvo, dual prop, like new.. 
Less than 20/houns. $18,000 
(708) 356-8974. 



•DOESN'T YOUR SpaeM 
MOM D—n» a VACATION 
FOR Moth»r'» D*y? 

SIERRA TRAVEL TRAILER, 
1991, 37ft. 2- bedroom, fully 
equipped, 12x24 enclosed 
deck, 8x8 storage shed,' 
yearly fee paid, at Blackhawk 
Campgrounds, Milton, Wise. 
$15,500. (414) 654-9266. 



804 



Cars for Sale 



BOAT SUPS 

FcilaVe 

It 12 i Nlppwttok 

In & Out Service 

BCATS7XHUGE 

Summerliallon Special 

•129* 

HAVING TROUBLE 
SELLING YOUR BOAT? 

Wi sfudzla* n boat consignment 
Sell your boat nowl 

Affiwnow 

Full Service Mirlru 
Guinnlesd Lowest Price 

Hurry - Going Fast 
(708) 587-DOAT 
(2628.) 




Check this 

Section Each 

Week!! 



/ 



720 



Spoils Equipment 



19" HALIEGH ATB, silver, 
quick release, excelent condi- 
tion, $150. (708)549-6859, 
leave message. 

GOLF CLUBS COMPLETE 

set, Gene Uttler' Rams plus 
cart and extra clubs. $225 
(414) 551-7259. ' 

MARCY EM/1 PRO Home 
Gym, hardly used, lice new. 
$350. (708) 433-6426. 

MEN'S 12-SPEED BIKE, 
$70, Excerslze bike, $40. 
(708) 639-8979. 

ROWING MACHINE- VIRTU- 
ALLY new, never used Nor- 
dic row TBXH rowing ma- 
chine wth electronic rJsplay/ 
monitor. Originaly $769, for 
$350. Includes video tape 
and all Instructions. (708) 
838-0246. 

SEA-OOO 1990 $3,200 In 

excellent condition (815) 
' 344-6432 After 7pm. 

SNOWBOARD ANY K-2 

Snowboard available. Brand 
new. Won in Contest. $350. 
Value up to $800. Wurllzer 
Console Piano $500. (708) 
872-3545 Ask for Steve. 

TAURUS ARMS 357 Mag 

4/lnch blue, like . new $200. 
N.Larson (708) 785-8546, 

eves. _^^ 

TED WILLIAMS 20GAUGE 
shot gun, Adjustable choke, 
$175. E.BorewsM (708) 
623-2526. 




ULTRALIGHT- 1983 MX 
Quicksilver, low hours, brand 
new . covering, parachute. 
S2.800/best (414) 857-7566. 




1992 FLAGSTAFF POP- 
UP camper, 21* open, awning, 
excellent condition, used 6 
times, $2,600 or best otter 
(708) 336-7366 Alter 4 pm. 

218. SHASTA CAMPER, 

$3,700. Fulfy equipped. 
Sleeps 6. Excellent condl- 
tlon. (708) 587-7153. 

FORD RANGER 1986 with 
camper, excellent condition 
$4,000 or Best Offer (708) 
263-6727. 

JAYCO 5th WHEEL 1992, 
camper, 24ft. rear kitchen, 
lots of cabinets, many ex- 
tras, like new condition, ex- 
tended warranty. Can be 
towed with 1/2-ton track. 
$11,000. (414) 537-2909. 

VIKING POP-UP camper, 
clean, sleeps 6, $1,400/or 
TRADE for small fishing 
boat, with trailer, equal in 
price. (708) 623-0177, any- 
time. 



■SPOHTS CAR" • FORD 

Mustang 1978, Mach 1, V8 
protect car, body In good 
shape. Best otter or trade. Call 
J.R. for mora Information (708) 
740-3415 _____ 

ATTENTION RACERS: BEST 

PRICE- Tires, Wheels, 
Shocks, Springs, Seats, 
Belts, Gauges. Driving suts, 
Helmets, Cages. We stock It 
all and more! FRC CHASSIS 
PROOUCTS. 

1/600-80O-0877, Dealer In- 
qulrte3 Welcome. 

BMW 3251 CONVERT- 
IBLE, 1988 red with new 
black lop, leather Interior, 
heated seats, al options, ex- 
cellent condition. $13,400 
FIRM DONT ASK (414) 
537-3472. 

BUICK REATTA, CONVERT- 
IBLE 1990, Black with tan 
top, 37,000/mlles. Loaded 
and beautiful. MUST SEEI 
$18,500/best. (708) 
516-4366. 

BUICK REGAL 1989, 2-door, 
Olympic Edition, 6-cyllnder, 
2.BL, power locks/windows, 
am/fm cassette, cruise,, ex- 
cellent condition. 
79,000/mlles. (708) 
223-1514, alter 5pm. 

BUICK RIVIERA- 1984, 

very good condition, 110,000 
miles, great transportation, 
$2,350. (708)726-7621, 
(815)675-6034. 

CADILLAC EL DORADO 
197S convertible, whle with 
red Interior, all the toys, good 
condition, make an offer 
(815) 385-7818. 




CADILLAC SEVILLE, 198S, 
light blue, blue leather. 4.1 
Iter DFI. 110,000/mlles. Eve- 
rything works. Most options. 
Recent tires. New brakes 
and Master cylinder. All serv- 
ice records. $3,800 Gary 
(414) 248-8900, ev es. 
(708)2704919, days. 

CAMARO, 1986, FULLY 
loaded, with T-tops, Good- 
Year tlres.Qrey, Excellent 
condition, negotiable. (708) 
726-1 103, leave message. 

CHEVETTE, 1985, 2-door 
standard. Runs great, new 
tiros, needs paint fob. $700. 
(708) 223-2405, after 4pm. 

CHEVROLET 350 CYLIN- 
DER Heads. Rebuilt Marty 
Stainless Steel Valves and 
Springs, MM Porting, Torker 
II Intake Manifold, Holtey 
650 Carburator, Earson Hi- 
Row Cam, Re-Worked HE1 
Distributor, Earson Vatve 
Covers and Air Cleaner. 
$400 Takes All. Buick 1911 
through 1986 Regal T-Type 
Hood $50. OfdemobHe 1981 
through 1966 Cutlass Trunk 
Lid $50. Chevrolet 1981 
Camaro Z-28 Parts, Front 
Nose, Hood, Left Hand Quar- 
ter Panel, Rear Bumper, 
Rear Window, Gas Tank and 
T-Tops. $500 Takes - All. 
Buick LeSabre 1983 Station 
Wagon 305 cl, All Power, 
91,000 Miles. Very Good 
Condition. $2500. Nissan 
1986 Extend-.a-Cab Pfck-Up 
Lowered, 5-Speed, Cap 
Needs a Utile Work, Runs. 
$1,000VBest Offer. (708) 760- 
6677 Leave Messaoo. 

CHEVROLET CAMARO 

1979 V6, $750 or Best Offer 
(708) 623-0602. 

CHEVROLET CAMARO 

1989 RS, Red, V6, 5 speed, 
Air, Power Steering, Power 
Brakes, 82K miles $4,800 
(708) 263-0417 

CHEVROLET CAMARO 

1994, black 6/cyllnder, 5- 
speed, air, tilt, cruise, fog 
Ights, rear window defroster, 
alarm, Z-28 wheels. Take 
over payments. (414) 

877-4369. 

CHEVROLET, MONTE 
CARLO 1977 58,000 miles, 
rebuilt $500 firm (414) 
657-8338 

CHEVY CAMARO RS, 1991, 
V8, loaded, excellent cond- 
Hon, 15k/mites, $10,900 
(706) 546-1487, after 4pm. 

CHEVY CAPRICE 1978, fully 
loaded, 305-englne, runs 
good. Has new brakes; ex- 
haust. $900. (706) 
546-1127, alter 6pm. 

CLASSIC QUARTER PANEL 
SALE. Mustang, Camaro, 
Nova, Chevele. Cutlass, Mo- 
pars, Pontlac, Chevrolet, 
more! Trunk pans, lloor 
pans, doors, fenders, bump- 
ers. New and California rust 
free. MARKS PLATING AND 
SUPPLY, 217-824-6184. 

DATSUN, 280ZX, T-TOPS, 

122k/rnltes. marroon, au- 
tomatic, $1,0O0/best (708) 
395-4716, alter Spm. 

DODGE DAYTONA 1985 

Turbo, 5-Speed, 64K mites, 
1 owner $2,700. Days 
(708)566-0177; Weekends 
A evenings (706) 223-1790. 

DODGE SPIRIT, 1979, 1981 
motor and transmission. 
Many new parts. $600 3714- 
19th Ave., (414) 656-0189. 




804 


Cars for Sale 



DODGE, 1984 600 ES 4-CV- 
llnder 4-door automatic, 
eveyihlng power. Fuly load- 
ed, Immaculate condition, 
asking $1,875. (414) 
652-0545. __ 

FORD CROWN VICTORIA, 

1985, 4-door, low miles, 
77,000. Uke new: tires, 
shocks, brakes. $2,850. 
(414) 862-2845. 

MUST SEEI 1986 Mustang 
GT, automatic, mint condi- 
tion. 40,000/mles, (2)sets ot 
wheels. 5,900/best offer. 
(708) 356-3707. 

FORD MUSTANG LX, 1987 

hatchback, air, sunroof, 
power windows and door 
locks. Am/fm cassette, low 
mites, excellent condition, 
Metallic grey. $3,200 after 
Spm (708) 566-6638. 

FORD PROBE 1990, Black, 
air, am/fm cassette, CD. 
Ground effects, Ferrari Kit, 
mag wheels, $6,500 (708) 
473-0322. 

FORD T-BIRD 1968 Turbo 
Coupe, 63K mites, 5-apeed, 
slver, gray leather, moonroof 
$5,500 or best offer (708) 
362-6684 „ ' 

FORD TEMPO 1988, au- 
tomatic, air, only 60K miles, 
perfect conditen, $3,650 Call 
Mr. Ed (615) 344-9818 

HONDA CIVIC 1987 4- 

Door, 5-Speed, Excelent Con- 
dition. Best Offer (708) 
526-5248 If no answer, 
please leave message 

HONDA CIVIC DX-1988. 4 
door, 5 speed, good condition. 
Price reduced to $3,950. 
(708)223-6568. 

HONDA CIVIC DX-1991, 5 
speed, air, am/fm cassette, 
great condition, $7,650 or 
best offer. (708)249-0319. 

HC.sDA PRELUDE- 1986, 
power sunroof, great com* 
tlon, $3,500 or best otter. 
(708)680-4312. 

HYUNDAI EXCEL 1990 
$3,900. GOOD CONDITION. 

(708) 587-8868. 

LINCOLN 1988 MARK VII, 
LSC Fully loaded, new tires, 
leather Interior, 60.000/mJtes. 
Asking, $7,400. (708) 
356-3358, after 6pm. 

LINCOLN TOWN CAR 
1986, good condition. $3,600 
or Best. Plymouth Duster 
1992, V6, AM/FM, air, forpay- 
ments (815) 344-0032 

LINCOLN TOWN CAR- 

1978, 85K mites, tul power. 
Cream colored, vinyl top, all 
leather Interior. Body and me- 
chanical In excelent condition. 
Have receipts. $3,995 or best 
offer. (708)336-9620. 

MAZDA GLC 1983, good 
shape, 4 door, manual trans- 
mission, $1,400; CAMARO 

1979, mechanically sound, 
body rusted S850 (708) 
949-1778. 

MAZDA RX7 1962 runs ex- 
cellent, $750. (708) 
740-1 01 B. 

NISSAN 200SX 1988, Steel 
blue, automatic, alarm, 
Loaded. $5,700/best (708) 
265-9377. 

NISSAN 200SX, 1985 excel- 
lent condition, $3,000/best. 
Call anytime (708) 263-8727. 

NISSAN ALTIMA GXE, 
1993, blue pewter, 

17,500/rnlles. Excellent con- 
dition, $14,300. (414) 
877-2123. 



WHY GAMBLE ON A USED CAR 

Brand New 1994 Hyundai Easel! 

America's LOWEST priced car. 

'131/nto. 

*e«S • NO WtfMINTS TIL JULY! 

*$500 rebate and Vatvecare rebate applied. Plus taxes, title, doc 
fees, license and options. For 60 mo. 826% for qualified buyers. 

Marquardt '^Hyundai 

On Rt. 41 at Wamhlrtfltofl ft • lest Ixit • Ournee 

• (70S) Mf-1300 • 






r^*-^** i*«**»* «^, 



< 




'•>.- 



CLASSIFIED LAkdANd Newspapers May 6, 1994 



■ 




NISSAN PATHFINDER SE, 
V6, 1989, 4x4. Mint condi- 
tion. White with dark blue In- 
terior, automatic with over- 
drive power stoorfng, 
brakes, windows, and back 
door locks. Air, am/tm cas- 
sette, alarm system, tilt 
wheel, cruise control, run 
roof, garage kept. Must Seel 
$12,000. (708) 973-0342, 
leave message. 

NISSAN PULSAR NX, 1986 
new brakes, shocks, and 
tires. Sunroof, runs great, 
52,200 (708) 662-0962. 

OLDS CUTLASS 1964 F85 
350-englne and . transmis- 
sion, power windows, steer- 
ing, brakes. New radiator, al- 
ternator, • battery, water 
pump, tiros, shocks, rebuilt 
front-end. Solid California 
car. Dally driven. 

$2,900/boa (703) 623-1887. 

OLDS CUTLASS CIERRA, 
International, leather seats, 
1989, electric everything. 
Runs and looks like newl 
$6,000. (708) 360-1424. 

OLOSMOBILE, 1988 CUT- 
LASS Sierra 4-door, V6, air, 
power steering, excellent 
condition, $4,000. (708) 
54B-1B11. 

OVERSEAS TRANSFER. 
Loaded 1994 Lumina 
Euro/1992 Caravan; Both 
Great shape. Must Sell! 
(708) 949-9383. 

PLYMOUTH GRAND 
VOYAGER SE, 1988, V6, 
108k, recent valve Job, new ra- 
dlator.computer, tires, shocks. 
Has afr. power steer- 
ing/brakes, tint windows, 
am/lm cassette, Ziebart. Ask- 
ing 55,200/best. (708) 
265-9003. 

MUST SELL! PLYMOUTH 
1991 Sundance RS, 2-tone, 
power everything, excellent 
condition $6.200/best otter 
(708) 395-1249, leavo mes- 



VOLKS WAGON JETTA- 

1966, 91K, groat condition, 
$3,000 or best offer. (414)854- 
3547. 



810 



Classic/Antique Cars 



AMC-1970 REBEL MA- 
CHINE cloan California car. 
$7,000 or best offer. 
(414)551-0521. 

CHEVROLET 1970 
MONTE Carlo, excellont 
shape $3,500 or best offer 
(708) 265-1949 

CHEVROLET VEGA 1977 
Arizona car, now clutch, muf- 
fler, shocks, tires and brakes. 
Runs great. Sold body $800 
(414) 697-Q91S 

CHEVY, IMPALA SS, 1965, 
REBUILT 396, 400-lurbo 
transmission, with shift kit, 
Asking $4,000/bost (708) 
746-8713. 

FORD, 1949 2-DOOR SOLD 
as 1st &500*est. Has been 
In garage fire. (708) 
356-0382. ' 

OAKLAND 1931, 4 Door, no 
block or Carburetor $2,500 
Porsche 914 1975 needs 
body work, best offer (708) 
587-0565 

PLYMOUTH BARRACUDA 

1969-340 auto, runs and 
looks great! Must sell. $4,200 
or best offer. (708)356-3157 
leave messago. 

PLYMOUTH SATELLITE 
■1965 Convertible, Red with 
black top, 'restored', 27K 
original miles $10,000 or 
best offer. Days: (708)949- 
3982, Evenings: (708)680- 
7319. 



PONTIAC 1988 SUNBIRD 
SE, 5-speed turbo, asking 
$3,500. Marty new parts. (414) 
697-0522 

PONTIAC CAMERO RS ' 
1991, V-8.Gray/Black Interior, 
40K miles, 10.000 miles lett on 
Warranty $9,000 (708) 
949-5316 

PONTIAC FIERO 1985 air 
conditioning, cruise, sunroof, 
80,000 miles, excellent condl- 
tlo 32.400 (414) 534-5279 

PONTIAC FIREBIRD, 1987 
V6, automatic, air am/!m 
cassette, new tires and 
paint. $4,400/ollor. (414) 
654-1981. ' 

PONTIAC GRAND AM 

Coupe 1988, 51,000 original 
mites, air, automatic transmis- 
sion, am/fm cassette player, 
excellent condition $4,995 
(708) 395-7916 

PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 
SE, 1993 4-Door, bright red, 
excellent condition, low miles, 
loaded, asking $14,500 (414) 
878-3639 

SUBURBAN, SILVERADO 
PACKAGE, 1984, air, cruise, 
4WD, $3,500 (708) 623-1650. 

TOYOTA 1087 CELICA, red 
coupe with sunrool, air, 5- 
speed manual, all maihtence 
preformed, no Rust. 
98,000/mlles. $4,900. (708) 
263-1046. 

TOYOTA CAMRY, 198* 5- 

speed, V6, air, power: wind- 
ows, doors, locks; am/fm. 
56.600/best (708) 
587-5651, after 5pm. 

TOYOTA CELICA, 1985, red 
convertible, full power, alarm, 
65k/m1les, like new, garage 
kept, not winter driven. 
$7,000. (708) 689-2446. 

TOYOTA SUPRA, 1984, 
every available option, 
41,000 original miles, black 
exterior, black/gray Interior. 
$6,500. (708) 746-0106. 

VOL KSW AGON JETTA 

1981, one ol the cleanest ar- 
ound, 4 door, 4 cylinder, fuel 
Injected, 5 speed, new ex- 
haust, struts, brakes, like new 
tires. Runs and drives excel- 
lent. $1 ,500 or Best Offer 
(708)398-6696 



STUDEBAKER, 1959, 
WHITE, SILVER HAWK, 
VERY Good condition. 
S6.395. (414) 653-0526. 


814 


Service & Parts 


USED AND REBUILT EN- 
GINES and TRANSMIS- 
SIONS. Also Ford and Mer- 
cury Car parts. Call Lenny. 
(815)675-6256. 


824 


Vans 



ATTENTION CONTRAC- 
TORS CHEVY Van 1983 
One Ton with shelves and 
rack, needs some work. 
$1,200 or best otfer (708) 
356-6925 

CONVERSION VAN, 1982, 
C-10; JENSEN HEALY, 
1973. Call tor details. (815) 
675-6276. 

DODGE MINI RAM Van 
1984 Customized, mini blinds, 
end-table $3,500 (708) 546- 
8720 

FORD 1991 CONVER- 
SION Van Dark Blue, 58K 
Miles 100K Warranty Avail- 
able, Excellent Condition. 
$16,500 or Best Otter (815) 
943-7807 

FORD, 1987 HIGH Cube 
Van, good condition, good 
work truck. Se.ooofoest. 
(708)623-6511. 




-i^TTl Four Wheel Drive 

■MEm 1 Jeeps 



834 



Trucks/Trailers 




CHEVY PICKUP, 1989, 1/2- 
ton Silverado 61k miles, 350 
4-speed, automatic, cruise, 
air, premium stereo, sliding 
roar window, cloth Interior, 
$7 t 8Q0 (708) 367-6775. 

DODGE 150 1990 Extend- 
ed Cab, now tune-up, now 
brakes and tires, 53K $9,800 
or best offer (708) 546-5740 

DODGE RAM CHARGER 
1978, with 7 1/2 foot Western 
Plow, 440 Automatic. Win sep- 
arate $1,000 or bost offer. 
Trade (or small car. (708) 
872-3609 

FORD EXPLORER XLT, 
1992, Loaded, 26,000/mltes 
$18,000/best offer (414) 
656-1826. 

FORD F-100 1966 Classic, 
very clean Kenlucky truck. 
Must sacrifice to buy a home. 
$3,800 or best orlor (708) 
6BO-5153 

FORD F-150 SUPER Cab 
1982 wtth cap and bedltner, 
$1,800 or best Todd (708) 
546-9259 Alter 5PM 

FORD F150 1984 with cap 
$1,700 (708) 587^1413 

FORD, 1983 TRUCK XLT 
250 extended cab with 1984 
35ft. Shasta trailer In A1 con- 
dition. Ready to go. Make 
ofler. Jerry, (708) 223-2925, 
eves. 

GMC 7000 SERIES, 1983, 
28,000 gross weight. 
117,000/mlles, V8, 2-speed 
axle. Good condition. Asking 
price , 55.000/negoilablo. 
(414)857-2621, Ask tor 
John, after 3pm. 

INSLEY 1975 H-560C. 
FORD 1973 F-350 utility 
body truck Dynawekt Tag-a- 
long Trailer. (708)546-1474 
Mon.-Fri. 6:30am-4:30pm. 

MAZDA PICKUP. 1987, long 
bed, cap, bedliner, am/fm, 
high miles. Excellent condi- 
tion Inside and out. $2,500 

(708) 587-1308. 



MUST SELLI CHEVY 1983 
BLAZER 4X4. Body rough, 
runs great, 2/sot of tires, 
$1,600. (815)385-8164. 

CJS JEEP- 1979, $1,500 
FIRM. (708)395-3192. 

FORD BRONCO II, 1988, 
4x4, good condition, 
57,000/best offer. Call Jim 
(708)816-3029. 

JEEP CJ7 1984 95K/mlles, 
3-tops, $4, 100 /be st. (708) 
973-0627, after 7pm or 
(815)344^044. before 5pm. 



CHEVROLET, 1984 1/2-ton 

4x4, V8, with body int. Alpine 
Stereo, candy apple red. 
Asking $6,000/best Possible 
Trade! (414) 657-3598. 

CHEVROLET, 1988 3/4-TON 
118k miles, 5-speed over- 
drive, tool box, VB, Ladder 
rack, $9,000 (414) 
942-1271. 



SUZUKI SAVAGE 650 
Cruiser 1987, maroon color, 
excellont condition, original 
owner $1,750 or best oiler. 
(708) 366-0669 

YAMAHA 1982 MAXIM 
XJ550, onfy 12,000 miles. 
Very clean, excellent condi- 
tion. $i,300A>est otfer (414) 
877-2968. 

YAMAHA 1982 VIRAGO 

920, 2,200/mllos, $1,800. 
Excellent condition. (708) 
658-1326. 

YAMAHA SECA 7S0-1981,. , 

groat shape, 15,000 miles, 
shaft drive, good tires, runs 
great. Will trade tor 60's, 70s 
mopar car parts. $1,250 or 
best offer. (70 8)587-8670. 

YAMAHA -ZUMA" SCOOT- 
ER-1989, 49cc, excellent 
condition, only used 2 years 
wtth 1,200 miles. Top speed 
40mph. $600 or best oiler. Call 
Bob, (708)223-8161 days or 
(708)587-4119 eves. 

HONDA 1985 GOLDWING 
Interstate GL 1200, 9000 
miles, cover, 2 helmets, excel- 
lent condition, $4,900 (414) 
658-1218 

HONDA 7S0CC 1977 14K. 
$750 (414) 657-6999 



838 


Heavy Equipment 



FORKLIFT -.. CATERPIL- 
LAR Older - $2,500 16 Inch 
Lalho $3,000 (815) 385-7137 

RUBBER TIRE BACK HOE. 
353 Detroit Deisel. 1-1/8 
yard bucket on front, 3/8yard 
bucket on back hoe. Aver-' 
age condition. $5,900 (414) 
551-8317. 



844 


Motorcycles 



tHar 

NOTICES 



Lakeland 



Newspapers 





•WATCH FOR ANNUAL- 
JERSEY PINE CRUISERS 
MID-NIGHT TOUR. 
WATCH FOR FLYERS IN- 
FORMATION Coming IN 
MAY. 

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1989 
Ultra Classl, mint condition, 
$12,000 55,000 miles (414) 
859-2336 

HARLEY DAVIDSON, 1979 
SPORTSTER XLH, 1000cc. 
good condition, many new 
parts. $3,500/best otfer 
(708)546-4116. 

HONDA MAGNA 11cc 1983 
Cruiser with V65 engine and 
shaft drive, Very fast and rail- ' 
able. $1,700 (708) 
546-8720. 

HONDA- 1977, 750 Four K, 
Vetter touring package, 6,500 
original miles. Must see to ap- 
preciate. $895 or best offer. 
(708)336-9620. 

KAWASAKI LTD 1978, 

1000CC, 12,000/mlles $900. 
(708) 973-1330, after 6pm. 

KZ700 1984, Very good con- 
dition, high miles, fairing, lug- 
gage rack $1,000*est (708) 
740-3916. 

MOTORCYCLE 

INSURANCE- SPORT, 
STREET, TOUR. FREE Info. 
EASY PAY PLANS! (708) 
869-0288. 

NIGHTHAWK 1982 750, 
Clean, and pre-season, 
ready to go for summer, 
$1,600(708)587-7107. 

NIGHTHAWK- 1984 HON- 
DA, 700cc, only 6K, runs ex- 
cellent. $2,400. 
(708)362-5605. 

NINJA ZX7 1989 Custom 
Green, radar detector, bra, jet- 
ted, yosh pipe 13K $3,000 
best offer (708) 265-0248 



* Are Yo* Looking n 

formSymkgoptef 

CONGREGATION 
AMECHOD 

1 500 Sunset Ave., Waukegan 
336-9110 

lA itk t i p i r a r IH*p, 740 p-» , 

ftfH*M,9Ml 

H—Mjlifciinlini 



43P«lpm 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT 
OF TRANSPORTATION 
NOTICE TO BIDDERS 
Municipality • Village of 
Gurnee; Rd. DI»L/ 
Twnshp Warren 

Township; County - Lake; 
Section - 94-0Q00041-GM 
Time and Place of 
Opening of Bids 
Sealed proposals for the 
improvement described 
below will be received at 
the office of the Village of 
Gurnee, 325 N. O'Plain 
Road, Gumee, Illinois until 
10:30 o'clock A.M., May 
26th, 1994. Proposals will 
be opened and read pub- 
licly at 10:30 o'clock A.M., 
May 26th, 1994 at the 
office of the Village of 
Gumee, 325 N. O'Plaine 
Road, Gumee, Illinois 
60031. 

Description of Work 
Name - Various Village 
Streets; Location - See 
Location Maps; Proposed 
Improvement - Application 
of approximately 33,520 
lineal feet and approxi- 
mately 921 square feet of 
pavement markings on 
asphalt roadways. 

Bidders Instructions 

1. Plans and proposal 
forms will be available in 
the office of the 
Engineering Department, 
Village of Gumee, 325 N. 
O'Plaine Road, Gumee, 
Illinois 60031 . 

2. All proposals must be 
accompanied by a propos- 
akguaranty as provided in 
Article 102.09 of the 
"Standard Specifications 
for Road and Bridge 
Construction", prepared 
by the Department of 
Transportation. 

3. The awarding authority 
reserves the right to waive 
technicalities and to reject 
any or all proposals as 
provided in Article 102.08 
of the "Standard 
Specifications for Road 
and Bridge Construction", 
prepared by the 
Department of 
Transportation. 

4. Bidders need not return 
the entire proposal when 
bids are submitted. 
Portions of the proposal 
that must be returned 
include the following: 

a. BLR 5701 - Contract 
Cover 

b. BLR 5704 - Notice to 
Bidders 

c. BLR 5705 - Contract 
Proposal 

d. BLR 5706 - Contract 
Schedule of Prices (if 
needed) 

e. BLR 5707 • Contract 
Schedule of Prices and 
Signatures 

f. BLR 5706 - Proposal Bid 
Bond (if required) 

All proposal documents, 
including - Proposal 
Guaranty Checks or 
Proposal Bid * Bonds, 
should be stapled together 
to prevent loss when bids 
are processed. 

By Order of 

Village of Gumee 

(Awarding Authority) 

Norman C. Balliet 

Village Clerk 

County Engineer/County 

Superintendent of 

Highways/Municipal Clerk 

0594A-683-Gen 

May 6, 1994 



! ■"■ ■ *» ■ i ^^^fftnzsp 



(Tffffrr\ 



SERVE EVERYONE 



For 

FAST 

service j 

FAX 

your classified ad. 

If you can't afford to be lied up on 
the phone, save time. Use the 
Lakeland Newspapers' Tax line. 

Fax your ad to- us in care of 
"Classified". Indicate ad 

classification and the weeks 
you would like it to run. 
We'll take It from therel 

If you have any other questions 

about faxing your ad, call us 

at (708)223-8161. 

FAX: 

(708) 223-8810 

Use the handy coupon beloio. . 



Classified Ad 
Order Blank 

Word Rate Ads 

15 words '6.25, 15c for each additional word {pre-paid)' 
15 words 7.25, 15c, for each additional word (to be billed) 
(Private Party Only)' 

Count words. Phone 
numbers and hyphenated 
words count as one word. 

Write Copy Below: 



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Town: 



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Lakleland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St 

P.O. Box 368 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

or FAX (708) 223^810 

We also accept Visa & MasterCard 
For more information, call 

(708)223-8161 









Mky 6, 1*94 UkelANd NwspApcis CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



Lakeland 



e&ahome 

►ROVEME] 

Kitchens • Baths • Decks 
Room Additions 

I NO JOB TOO SMALL 

\FREE ESTIMATES) 

(708) 526-3976 



• ALUMINUM fi 

* VINYL SIDING 

ir Si 'till & FiiSC!,.! 

• Window liikI Wnnfl Trim 

* Vinyl lv.| i i .■Mi>-iit ,VirMll...*i', 



t'k in.it.i;.!' 



•k | r , ,,,.. [ f ;, ,- | til'. i'J**#J 

* g^ , ,« r 'I ■-""'•■ - 

\ EAGLE SIDING CO. 

* (708) 526-7222 



c^coffitigs 



(ffie 6r.lnfl-'imq| 




(ination to reality 
C«K us \vhen pu 
neecf a sign..... 



NORTH AVE. - ANT10CH, IL 

(708)395-7217 




c&ica 



Mrs. Ashley was bom with a Spiritual 
psychic ability to help those who are In 

need of help to restore Love, Healln, 
Contentment and Peace of Mind, and 

Can Remove all Unnatural Influences 

that are holding you back from your 
full pofentlalln life, . 

Spiritual Psychics 

Specializing In Tarot Card Readings 

Aura & Crystal Rock Readings 

Rt. 60 on Rt. 45 

MUNPELEIN 566-2019 



RICH PULVERIZED 
TOPSOIL 

8 YDS • • • : • f 85 

16 YDS ... . ;.«fllg 

22 YDS *1 72 

Prompt D»H**ry 7 Uayh a WmJc 

BOBCAT SERVICE 

local D&vry 
Out of Ana Xtra Dmt Charge 

(708) 526-0154 





************ 

t DECK SAVERS + } 

Pressure Washing a 
J Restoration - Staining 
f. 'Decks 'Siding 

+ ' •Fences »Docks * 

A pressure Treated Wood is ^ 

Not Weatherproof! J» 

r INSURED A 

J. (708)395-8428 *" 



\ 



/ 

(» •) SM-97M 

Specializing In Big Scretn TV/VCR 
Computart&terao 

/n Home - Carry In Service 

211 So. Rand Rd. 

Lake Zurich, IL 

(With this al Frae estimate. Cany In only) 




AFFORDABLE 
VACATIONS!! 

JOIN OUR EXCITING 
TRAVEL CLUB 

You Receive 

50% OFF ON OUALITY HOTELSl 

Up to 50% off on condos, 

CRUISES, & MOREl 

CALL 708.249.6151 

ncPT. CB3?4 FOR DETAILS^ 




jQiveways 
•Resurfacing 
I i -Repairs 

'-•Parking Lots 
O 



•Seal Coating 
Residential Specialists 
Bonded and Insured 

ii FREE ESTIMATES ! 

(f OS) *4M»S" 
{815)344-841 

iiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimti 



MBttMbmB© 

lrtertora«4Btotor 
MtfagftWalkmrtaf 

*F«r a $&■■•«* Job 
atthcriftlrtaiicer 

16 YEARS EXPERIENCE 

v 587-6211 



If m tow to eofik' 

hate to eoek# 

w |nit need new (deaf ttiare a 

MHKK» £4f£P 

with your friends! 
CALL FOR DETAILS 

<itt>76WM$ 



TOTAL 
HOME SERVICES 

; -kWedooll home repairs, remodeling 
I roofing drywall and painting 
'• -k Yard cleaning and landscaping 
'. -k Tuckpolnt, tile and grouting 
[■k Moving and hauling 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(708) 362-6855 

Available 24 hours per day 



P&D Decorating 

I a Total Service Company 



Professional Estimates 



btn.i.ic 71 " 



.rnmmercl -Residential 

Sew Contraction .Excellent References 

•Personalized Services -Dry Wall 

•Reasonable Rates •P a P e _ r t *l a £V T 

•Fully Insured „ -Full Finishes ■ 

We Do Everything 
rwiM S26-74Q9 



I SUSIE'S ELECTROLYSIS 
CLINIC, INC. 

Permanent Removal of Unwanted Hair 

Introductory Offer 
New Clients Only 
1st 15 Min. Session 



HO 



*« 



\Vm mmn. net awn WJSSE^I 

•IMINBM ttANS ■ MSVMta AND MOM 

WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER . 

\(708) S4 8-1300 X 

» _^au i mm — — ^» 



Offer Good Thru 6/30/94 

462S Grand Av*., Gurne*. IL €0031 ■ 

(Located in Jandaa Family Hair Salon) 

662-6008 



***************** 

UHuuiyskisiDiSuMMnS 
i Storage Skoal* * 

* Any size boat trailer -or- J 
J 2 snowmobiles on trailer 

• ' 

'* 
• 




$ Private Affairs Banquet Hall * 

* Located on Long Lake * 

J Parties of 75-200 * 
****************** 




TO 

Y0URADHERE 

CALL 

708-223-8161 



, 



HOME 
REMODELING & 
IMPROVEMENT 

All Phases 
Reasonable Rates 

FREE ESTIMATES 
(708)587-9729 



Alligator 



Carpentr 

DECKS 

BASEMENT FINISHING 

YARD SHED ASSEMBLY 

OTHER SERVICES 

INSURED 

CHARLIE 

(708)223-4384 



SPRING 
SPECIAL 

10% OFF 

SicB-oplMfcrtMaySlit 






"! 1 



WE SEAL DRWEWAYS 



...and small parking fdtt 
•Seal Coating -Patchwork •Crack tiggr^ 
Protect and Pmsm • Reasonable rates. C* tor c [FREE estimate 
(708J 740-4051 or (708) 356-1911 ^^^ M 
AMERICAN SyAT^QATING BY GEORGE 



rPA Services 

Preparation of individual/ 
partnership, corporation & 
trust income tax returns, 
computerized returns - 24 
hour turn arounds. Small 
business accounting, tax & 
consulting. 

Reasonable rates 

(708) 680-2599 



BEEPERS!! 



»»89 



Sai««*S*fv)c« 

•*4fSB8§l 



> ti—toeiNV* 

• AI Co iwet C h T9— > , 

!• b«» Month JUrttrm :• liorrt ca* 

Action Beeper Corp. 
546-9690. _ 




COFFEE MUG SPECIAL! 

^ 11 oz. White Porcelain 
e with 1-color imprint 
g as low as $.99 each. 
Don't miss this special offer! 

Call ITEMS and IDEAS at (708) 438-748 8 

ISLAND HOME SERVICE 

Bathroom Specialists 

Handyman.Service 

Alf Types Flooring - Repairs 

Bath Overhauls - Basements 

"Call Us And Ask" 

ESTIMATES ALWAYS FREE 

(708) 487-4331 



ti 



JACK'S 

REMODELING 

Dormers. Skfir^.Sotfll.WWows 
Decks • Bilhrooms ■ Ba»menla 

FREE ESTIMATES 

plus references 
CALL JACK AT 

(708) 546-3759 



Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



^^IDlNGMBlWr <v 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS- DOORS 






Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 



T C 



T & C METAL CO. 

Wa rocyclQ aluminum cans! 

W« also buy •Insulated Wlr* 

•Copper *Brass *Load •Stainless 

•Aluminum Sldln© .Batteries •Zinc 
•Auto Radlatois •Catalytic Converters 



Buyers of non-terroui metals. 
Industrial accounts welcome. 



37ft Prairie St. 
Crystal Lake. IL 



ftlS-459-4445 



Hours: Mon.-Frl. 8-5; Sat. 8-1 



1 Block S. of Hwy. 176 
Behind J & L Gas Station 



-i 

i 






t . t . I <v «>« r 



•*«' < 



fl CLASSIFIED' lAkElANtl Newspapers M»y 6, 1994 




Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



r/i 



TO PLACb^ 
YOUR AD HERE 
CALL 

708-223-8161 



Si 






jsssss^ss 



-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Servicer 



ni 



Xtfy.K-f 

S:SSKK: : :--r.vW-: 
(>g&M 



£> 



palming & Staining 

m Call Now 
Fr*e Estimates 

Fully I^SWWWj: 
Quality Wortc with V/rHten 

"ItSofwitiir" ;: 



#s* 



: : ; :«-l 



f7Q8) 5Xb-XXQ7 

!?AND, STONE, GRAVE? 

Pvheriud Black Mit, 

| Pile Driving & Excavating 

I Sewer & Water Construction 

SCHNEIDER'S 
TRUCKING, INC. 

> (708)395-2810 



Greenhouses 

Ftowar and vegetable ptanfta ol (5JH* 
all kinds $5.95 and up ^y 

Perennial plants, 3* peat pots $1.00 each 
Vegetables, herbs and perennial plants, 
geranium plants ol all kinds 
$1.00 each and up 
« Hanging baskets and potted plants 
3 Mile* north of Long Grove 
1/a mile north of Route 22 
onOLdMcHcnryRoad 




I 



S 




IMMKSI 

S MAU EMOfffit *H*» 
fPMNO SPECIAL - 

^35i0bTUNEHJP^ c 

ON ALL HAND LAWrNMOWERS. 

•COMPLETE MAINTENANCE CHB3C WW ,FUW 

REPl/CWENTKHl CHANCE 'AIR FILTER CLEANING 

SffiBflOR IHETWINC >E!*MAND DECK 

CLEANING WdE SHARPENING AND BALANCING 

•FKEdCKUPANOpHMW 

M'ngLtm MmrSmm-CiS (or Ertwule 

1-800-779-3917 



DUNCAN 



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or 

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Fine Decorative Painting >Wj|kobred spray 
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7rM«timtl»»'lr»u't*Qr«*« to «• 
U.S.Sehcol ot ProfHtteiwl Papwtwntf off 



MAINTENANCE PMNTING 



w 



HEADACHES 



WANTED 

Honest, caring doctor who has 
helped 100's of pain sufferers. 
Non-invasive, conservative care. 
$200 in services for participation. 

Call 249-0041 for details. 



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•Remodeling 

Kitchens, Bathrooms & Hec Rooms 

Painting And Wallpapering 
flooring 

(All Types) 

•Siding And Roofing 
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Decks & Additions 

Ul Work Veiy Well tone \ 

FREE ESTIMATES, CAU 
■414)537-1439 1 



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If You NEED A Contractor, 
You NEE D U s! 

FINDERS 

(708) 548-FIND 

For FREE information on consumer preferred 

contractors and associate businesses! 
Ask about our valuable Project Planning Checklist! 
Contractors - Call today for your registration form! 



Discover 
Renting 

You can do it yourself 
(708) 740-8800 

Round Lake Park 





Experienced 
Carpenters 

Crown Mouldings, 

Decks. Porches, Doors, 

Chair Rail Trims, Etc. 

Call Mike 

(708) 213-4871 

(8IB) 337-7240 

FREE Estimates Insured 



DECKS PLUS 

CONSTRUCTION 
GENERAL CARPENTRY 

. Custom Decks ■ Porches 
Room Additions • Basement Remodeling 
Bathrooms - Kitchens • Custom Carpentry 
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FREE ESTIMATES 
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PAINT - STAIN 



Siding. I tlm, wood, dry wall block, 

stucco, concrete. 

Wo have the experience and the equipment 

to do the |ob right 

Free Estimates Reasonable Rales 

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TAX PREPARATION 



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Certified Public 
Accountant 

•Individual 
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(708) 587-4552 



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& Repair 

$3Qflfl 

Call John 
(708)548-1403 



Intoriors/Extoriors 
FREE ESTIMATES 

Insured Quality Work 
Top Line 



Materials I 
WE"DObUR OWN WORK 



References - Top 



Call Preston 
(708) 565-1002 



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Man. - FrI. 8-5, Sat. 8-3 




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I708V 223-8601 A 




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May 6, 1 f 94 bvkclANd Newspapers SPORTS 




Lake C ounty's top 4-H demonstrators show their best 



Jamie Hagcn, age 11 of Park 
City, of the Chain O' Lakes 4-H 
club, was named best demon- 
strator at the Lake .County 4-H 
Demonstration Contest held in 
Grayslakc. Jamie showed the 
audience the essentials of horse 
grooming. She had first been 
chosen as the grand champion in 
the general demonstrations cate- 



gory, junior division. ' how to maTe 1 bffibbcrry gems in 

Manya Rcinicr, age 12 of Zion, , the foods demonstration catego- 



of the Helping Hands 4-H club 
was chosen as the grand champi- 
on in the general demonstra- 
tions, senior division for horse 
head drawing. Amy Henschen, 
age 11 of Gurncc, of the Warren 
Hotshots 4-H club, was named as 



ry. Hagcn/ Rcinicr and Henschen 
will represent Lake County at the 
Illinois State Fair In August. - 

Felice Kelly, age 13 of 
Wadsworth, of the Chain O'Lakcs 
club, and Andre Relnler, age 8 of 
Zion, of the Helping Hands club, 



ons in the senior and junior divi- 
sions, respectively. Others in the 
Blue Group included Lindsay 
Odgcn, age 10 of Antloch, and 
Natalie Kelly, age 11 of 
Wadsworth, both of the Chain 



and commented on the qualit y of 

the demonstrations. An integral ~ 

part of the 4-H program is "learn- 



ing by doing" and 4-H members 
are encouraged to show others 
what they have learned by giving 
O'Lakcs club arid Jessica Broy; demonstrations. During the Lake 



the grand champion for showing were chosen as reserve champi- 



Pedal away for the St. Jude's bike-a-thon 



age 12 of Lake Villa, an Eager 
Beavers member. The Kcllys and 
Broy will serve as alternates to the 
State Fair. Others participating In 
the contest included Josh Bellah, 



County Fair, 4-H members will 
reprise their award winning 
demonstrations in the 4-H build- 
ing. 

The organization, 4-H, is the 
youth educational program of the 



St Jiitlc Children's Research 
Hospital has announced plans for 
the Spring Grove "Wheels For 
Llfc"bikc-a-thonMay21. 

Karen Santi will serve as coor- 
dinator of the event and encour- 
ages all residents to support this 
important community effort. 

St. Jude's Children's Research 
Hospital, founded in 1962 by the 
late entertainer Danny Thomas, 
is the largest childhood cancer 
research center in America in 
terms of the number of patients 
treated and treatment success.. 

Funding for the treatment 
and research programs conduct- 
ed at St. Judc Hospital conies pri- 
marily from public support of 
events such as the bikc-a-lhon. 

This year's bike-a-thon poster 
child, - 7-ycar-old Shauna 
Richtcrs, represents all of the 
patients treated at this world- 
renowned pediatric research and 
treatment facility. Richtcrs was 
diagnosed with Wilms' tumor, a 
malignant growth of her left kid- 
ney in Dec. 1990. 

Richtcr is in remission from 

Local caddies win 




This fall 209 students from 14 
states will begin their freshman 
year in college with full tuition 
and housing scholarships from 
the Evans Scholars Foundation. 

The foundation selected the 
scholarship winners at meetings 
held in 10 states this winter. Most 
of the students will live in Evans 
Scholars chapter houses at 14 
universities. 

In Lake County among the 
Evans scholars include Michael 
Douglass of Beach Park, William 
Ford of Wauconda, James 
Bollinger of Vernon Hills, John 
Kiriakopoulos of Waukcgan, 
Daniel Ryklin of Buffalo Grove 
and Jeffrey Burke of Waukcgan. 

All of the scholars arc golf 
caddies or former caddies who 
earned scholarships based on 
four criteria: academic record, 
financial need, caddie record and 
character. 

"These young people have 
demonstrated their abilities and 
dedication both in the classroom 
and as caddies on the golf 
course," said Jim Moore, educa- 
tional director of the Evans 
Scholars Foundation. 

"We are confident they will 
continue the tradition of acade- 
mic excellence and campus 
involvement established by the 
6,000 former caddies who have 
graduated as Evans Scholars." 

Douglass and Ford will attend 
Marquette University; Bollinger, 
the University of Missouri; 
Kiriakopoulos, Northern Illinois 
Univeristy; Ryklin, Northwestern 
University; and Burke, the 
University of Wisconsin. 

The Evans Scholars program, 
sponsored by the Western Golf 
Association, was founded in 1930 
by Charles "Chick" Evans Jr., 
famed Chicago amateur golfer. 



her cancer and completed her 
chemotherapy in June 1991. She 
is doing well and returns to St." 
Judc Hospital every six months 
for checkups. Richtcrs celebrated 
her last chemotherapy treatment 
with a present she had eagerly 
looked forward to: a new bike. 

All residents and businesses 
arc encouraged to lend their sup- 
port to the hospital by making a 
contribution or by becoming a 
rider. . 

There are three area children 
currently using St. Jude's 
Research Hospital. Individuals 
and businesses can assist in the 
effort in a variety of ways. 

Individuals can, make phone 



age 11 of Round Lake, of the 

Eager Beavers, and Ashley University of Illinois Cooperative 
1 I. ?.? CS A. enV .l°_ P S: * 1 Tennyson, age 9 of Fox Lake, of Extension Service and is open to 



thank you notes, drive bikers to 
and from the park, sit in at a 
checkpoint station, pass out 
treats to bikers, help solicit spon- 
sors, set up a fust aid station and 
work a registration table. 

Businesses can lend their sup- 
port by displaying the poster In 
their businesses, encouraging 
employees to ride, encouraging 
employees to volunteer time or 
donate snacks, treats and prizes 
for riders. 

The bike-a-thon will be held 
at Channel Lakes State Park in 
Spring Grove. To volunteer or to 
obtain a sponsor sheet, call 973- 
2349. 



the Chain O' Lakes club. 

Krista Dahl of Inglcsidc, a for- 
mer outstanding Lake County 4- 
•H member, judged the contest 



all youth between the ages of 8 
and 19. For further information 
about the 4-H program contact 
the 4-H office at 223-8627. , 



White Sox offer kids chance to 
learn baseball from top minds 



The Chicago White Sox and 
The Sports Authority are offering 
Chlcagoland kids full-ride schol- 
arships to White Sox training cen- 
ters. 

. The new week-long baseball 
camps arc scheduled at more 



than 100 locations this summer. 

- Boys and girls between the 
ages of 8 and 17 arc eligible. For 
more information on how to 
apply for a scholarship, call 752- 
9225. 



50 FREE 4 



«P gk , ff& For Everyone Opening Charge 
)J£ 9 II Cm\3 Accounts - 3 Days Only. 



90 DAYS SAME AS CASH 

with purchase and credit approval ._ 



PLEASE CALL AHEAD TO SET UP CUTTING TIME 

SHOUT ON CASH? CKAMffJVf 

OPEN TODAY 10-6 



CALL NOW! 



(TOB) 838-MEAT 




(708) 

838-MEAT 

NOW! 



WHEN YOU COME TO 

CRAHfRY MEW CO 



RELAX! Have a cup of coffee on 

No Frills! Nothing Fancy! 

Just High Quality Beef at the Lowest 

Possible Prices! 



€tf&R©i 
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NO FINANCE 
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3 Ho Mm* Or CWiytae Ctagi. 
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Jm* cal (701) I 



HOURS 

Wed-Sat. 10-6 

Sun., Mon. & Tues. 

Phone Calls Only 



FOOD 8TAMP8 ACCEPTED 



EXTRA! NO CHARGE 

BONUS! 

60 Lbs. 

WHh Ptuttmm of 300 Mm. Bmf A Op 

1 of No Charge! 
No Charge! 
No Charge! 
No Charge! 
No Charge! 
No Charge! 



■" Bacon 

iaU)|, Pork 
HI Chop* 

8 Lb*. Pork 
Steak 



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Rooat 

15 Chicken* 




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Guarantees on all 
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No time limit 



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* . ... ^ w a •» * 



fl SPORTS LaIceIancI Newspapers May 6, 1994 



!■; i 



lC-i 



Pet 




PfiRfiDE 



Follow the 10 Commandments of pet boarding 



Before you board your receive three 15-mlnute 

dog anywhere, please ©xerclse periods dally, 

keep these facts In mind. ^O^dless 
These commandments 



are copied directly from 
the American Pet Board- 
ing Assn. and every 
boarding kennel should 
follow these standards. 
Ton Commandments of 
pet boarding 

1 . Thou shalt not board 
In any facility that will not 
let you see where your 
pet will be kept. There Is 
no law or Insurance regu- 
lation prohibiting you from 
seeing the conditions un- 
der which your pet will be 
boarded. 

2. Thou shalt not board 



weather. Every animal 
should be able to stand 
up normally, turn around, 
and to lie down and 



mals and clean and disin- 
fect their accommoda- 
tions as required, but 
never, less than once in 
every 24-hour period for 
warm blooded animals. A 
reputable boarding facll- 



stretch out In its holding ity will always have 



area. In addition, cats 
and dogs must be able to 
exercise to maintain their 
health. 

7. Thou shalt not board 
your pet In a facility that 
lacks properly designed 
ventilation to maintain the 
ambient temperature be- 
tween 65 and 80 degrees 
Fahrenheit for all warm 
blooded animals. 

fl. Thou shalt not board 



trained attendants avail- 
able. 

10. Thou shalt not 
board your pet In a facility 



that permits the boarding 
of different owners* pets 
In the same space. 
Boarding strange pets in 
the same space without 
the owners' permission 
may be motivated by 
unethical profit-oriented 
policies and may be a 
very dangerous prac- 
tlce.-by CATHIE SABIN, 
B.C. Dog Training 



CtUUtJ^tossin^ $>et (Renter 

AKC PUPPIES 




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•Tropical Fish 
•Hand Fed Birds 
•Kittens 
•Small Critters 
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540-7005 



UKE VIEW PLAZA 

65 Sbuth Rand Rd., Lake Zurich 

(North of Hwy 22) 






In any facility that boards V°, ur P? f ln x a f a cilltv tnat 



or treats sick animals In the 
same general area as 
are kept boarded pets. 
Boarding your pet In a 
facility where animals with 
contagious diseases are 
being treated exposes 



will not contact your own 
veterinarian In event of a 
serious Illness or Injury. Im- 
proper treatment of a 
symptom by a layman or 
different veterinarian 
could cause problems for 



does not feed the anl- 



your pet to a wide variety Y our P e *- 

of Illnesses that may even 9 - Thou M * not b ° ard 

prove fatal. y° ur P et ln a facllltv that 

3. Thou shalt not board 
In any facility that does 
not require proof of 
proper vaccinations. 
Placing your pet In an 
environment with unvac- 
clnared pets can result In 
serious Illnesses and even 
death. 

4. Thou shalt not board 
In any facility that Is not 
clean and well main- 
tained Inside and outside. 
A boarding facility that Is 
not well maintained may 
be Indicative of a lack of 
ability or motivation to 
provide proper care for 

your pet. 

5. Thou shalt not board 

In any facility .that em- 
ploys Immature or Incom- 
petent employees to 
clean and care for the 
animals. 

6. Thou shalt not board 
your dog In a cage or 
pen unless you know It will 



\Lo%i Ahimrt. time 

Fresh an J Salt Water Fish 

Mini Reefs 

Weekly shipment of live coral and fish 

Opening May Utv Reptiles & Supplies 

2 SMpmartts of Salt and Fresh Wafer RA a week and reptiles 

< 414 > 248-2058 

503 Broad St.. Lake Geneva 

Hie* M-F 10-6 Sit 10-5 
Ctind Sundayi 




® 



FOUR PAWS 

TRAINING CENTER 

"Positive Training With Positive Results" 

All training methods are not alike. Come visit us during classes and 
observe a different approach lo dog training. Our methods utilize food, 
enthusiasm and praise, and exercises are broken down Into pieces 
both dogs and owners can manage. We have classes for puppies and 
older dogs, and lor all levels ol obedience competition training. For 
more Information please give us a call. 



COURSE 

General Obedience: 
•Puppy Kindergarten • 

•Basic Obedience I - 
•Basic Obedience II • 
Competition Cliiaae: 
•Novice (CO Title) 



SCHEDULE NEXT TERM STARTS 



Thu. 6:30 PM or 
Sat. 10 AM 

Thu. 7:30 PM or 

Sat. 11 AM 

Thu. 8:30 PM 



Won. 7 PM of Thu. 9 AM 
Won, PM or Thu. 10 AM 



May 19 
June 18 
May 18 
June 18 
May 19 



May IS or May 19 
Hay 19 or May 19 



•Open (CDX Title) - 

20970 White Road • Antioch, IL 60002 • (708) 838-0523 



$1«WW Puppy Drauring 

Entry is FREE! -** 

Winner Purchases an AKC J 
Black Lab Puppy for S1.00 \ 
Register to win at: 

R&R Rets ' 

2416 WASHINGTON - WAUKEGAN 

(Kitty Corner from St. Therese Hospital) 



R&R P£T8 

Puppies 

AKC A Mixed Breeds 




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Maltese 

Cocker 

German Shepherd 

Elkhound 




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Starting © $69.00 
241 6 Washington - Waukegan 

(Kltty-comor from St Tfwreee Hompitmi) 



I 
I 
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B.C. Dog Training 

Grooming And Pet Supply 



NEW CLASSES STARTING 

May 23 ^Monday 

10:00 am 

7:00 pm 

8:15 pm v 

Juna 9 - Thursday 

7:15 pm 



•Grooming 

•Puppy and Adult Day Care 6AM - 6PM 
•Premium Dog and Cat Foods 
•Dog & Cat Supplies 



•Obedience 
•Conformation 
•Agility 
•Flyball 




BETTER CANINES 

"Where We Teach You To Drain 
And Care For Your Dog" 

872 Tower Road Mundelein 

(708)566-1960 



BIRD* 

Handfed Cockatiels 

Grays • $49.99 /*,]' 
Lutinos *aooo4?*4 

Canaries 



$69.99 



Males 
Females 

Baby Parakeets 
$8.99 





2/$ 18.99 
2/$ 14.99 
2/$ 14.99 



Terras 

$1.00 SALE 

Terra Neons, Serpens, Rummynose, 

Black Terra, 

Vonrio, Bloodfln, 

Whitecloud, 

Tigerbarbs, 

Ptqtys 

$1.99 Male BeHaT 

3/$3.29SworclTdte 
$1.49 Sllverangels 

AlARinE PI5H 




Pied Java Rice $37.99 each 
Orange Cheek $2/$24.99 



Yellow Tang $14.99 

Bar Goby $8.99 
Unicorn Tang $49.99 

Banded Eel $29.99 
Marine Betta $44.99 
Asstd. Damsel $3.99 

Eatanabs £xce] ^k^^^t §Sg> 

inuir »««*** 9anm iAMS^I£lde^^MAX 

All THU AAD MUCH HIORC AT YOUR PIT'! rAVORITriTORI 



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open 1515 N. LEWIS AVE., WAUKEGAN 

Mon -Fn 9am-9pm )|\| "THE PLAZA 

Su°n IQam-^m (708) 336-2150 









K1 



M*y 6, 19?4 L*k£lANd Newspaper SPORTS 





, Yikes dawn new era with mini-camp 



to have his jersey retired. 

But Kampcndahl is in charge 
of the Vikings now and his era 
began with workouts Sunday at 
Round Lake High. 

"We had 45 guys here. I was 
hoping for a few more, but they 
arc all working hard. We arc tim- 
ing them in the 40-yard dash and 
agility drills/' he said. 

The new head man, from 
Antioch, has named Reggie Midwest Football League North 
Johnson as the offensive coordi- Division. 

Local youth cops blue ribbon in dairy judging 



The accomplishments almost 
literally spoke for themselves. ■ 

A sign served as a reminder 
for Lake County Vikings semi-pro 
football aspirants that Kurt 
Kampcndahl is used to winning. 

After all, he played on the win- 
ning team 09 percent of his 337 
games; was a member of 17 league 
titles, 7 national championship 
teams and 15 times was named all 
league. All that was before being 
one of six Racine Raiders players' 



nato'r. kamrJchUalll, .Willi HUlp ' 
from his assistants, will handle 
the defense. 

"Most of the prospects have 
one or two years past high 
school," Kampcndahl said. "That 
is a great asset." 

Another camp will be held at 
Round Lake High on June 5 from 
10 a.m. to noon. 

Lake County competes in the 



Wes Qulst roaches back to throw a pass In Lake County Vikings 
mlnl-camp. Another camp will be hold June 5 at Round Lake 
High.— Photo by Steve Peterson 



Chris Smith, 17, of Antioch, a 
member of the Millburn Clovers 
4-M Club, earned a blue rating In 
the Regional 4-11 Dairy Judging 
Contest held recently in 
McHcnry. lie will represent Lake 
.County at the Dairy Judging held 
in conjunction with the State 
Summer Events at the University 
of Illinois campus in June. 

In dairy judging, members 




Lake County Races 

Approximately 4,600 runners take off from Shlloh Park In TJon during the Lake County Races, The 
^marathon ended at Ravfnla Park.— Photo by Bill Dermody Jr. 



- 

Taekwon do 



From page C32 

The Lake Zurich, area tac 
kwon do artists who took home 
trophies included Kristen Milosh, 
Eugene Schulman, Trevor Sulato, 
Paul Ilishnevski, Dan Rosanova, 
Pat Williams and Elliot Weston. 

Sicbcr said the Lalcc County 



participants performed well 
because area instructors arc 
committed to training their stu- 
dents to fight to win. 

. "There arc two types of tac 
kwon do schools," Sicbcr said. 
"The type to win and the types to 
give their students what they 



want so they keep coming back." 
Lang added that the students 
arc trained to sec themselves 
winning visibly before they win 
physically. 

"It's all about self-improve- 
ment They have to believe in 
themselves," Lang said. 



f 



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must rate -cows according to 
appearance and select the heifers 
they feci will be the best milk pro- 
ducers in the future. In making 
these judgments the member 
must know which characteristics 
to look for in each breed of ani- 
mal and in animal development 
Smith, a sophomore at 
Antioch Community . High 
School, and the son of Ed and Pat 
Smith, is proficient in dairy judg- 
ing. Last year he participated for 
the first time in the Regional and 
State Contests and in a State 
Invitational held at the Illinois 



lakeland Newspapers 

(708) 223-8161 



WeLcome 
WAqoN 

Helpful Civic information lo acquaint you 
with your community. Call the Welcome 
Wagon representative so that she may 
visit you. 

- Antioch 

Karen Brenda 

386-6377 3*5-021 

Fox 

Loke/lngloaldo/ 

Spring Grow* 

Sherry 
(708) 667-1626 

Grayslako 
Wlfdwood 
Lake Villa 



Viola 
336-5671 



Linda 
223-1607 



Gurnoo 



Patti 
223-6468 



Linda 
735-0690 



Lake 

Ann 
540-5780 



Zurich 

Jeanette 
438-8048 



Llbortyvllta 

Sally 
680-1588 



Lincolnshire 

Letty 
845-3161 

Long Qrova 

Klldoor 

Hawthorn Woods 

Bonnie 
540-7881 

Mundololn 

Laurie Marta 

506.1853 405-0130 



I 



Round Lako 

Prfscilla 
740-3183 



Vornon Hllla 
Letty Maureen 

845-3161 848-6826 

Wauconda 

Island Lako 

Lee 

526-7508 

You are entitled to a complimentary 
subscription from your hometown 
newspaper. To receive your paper, 
contact your Welcome Wagon repre- 
sentative or call Lakeland Newspapers 
at (708) 223-816!. For information 
about positions with the Welcome 
Wagon call Marta at (708) 577-3637. 



State Fair, achieving blue ribbons 
at all levels. For further Informa- 
tion about the 4-M program, con- 
tact the 4- II office at 223-8627. 



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SPORTS LaIceIancI Newspapers M*y 6, 1 994 



LakeXcnmty-Raees gives Onines try to realize goal 



A Lake Zurich woman will be 
spending time in Mexico City this 
summer thanks to her efforts in 
the Lake County Races. 

Rcth Onines turned in a time 
of 3:26:23, good enough for 
eighth place. She finished third 
among Mexican women, earning 
(he qualification to the Mexico 
City Marathon July 31. 

"One of my goals was to finish 
in the top 10 and qualify for the 
Mexico City race," Onines said. "I 



have a lot of relatives in the 
Mexico City area and I plan to 
mix a vacation with It." 

Like race winner Donna 
Perkins of St. Francis, Wis, 
Onines is an ultra-marathon run- 
ner. 

"It is a lot like marathon run- 
ning, but a new challenge," 
Onines said. 

Perkins, who won the Races 
event by four minutes with a time 
of 3:03:30, used the Sunday run as 




JHON 




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a prep for the U.S. national 
team's race in Japan. 

"You get more of a runner's 
high.-To train for an ultra run is 
quite interesting. It felt good. I 
even had a kick," Onines said of 
previous ultra race. • 

Onines, a Lake Zurich house- 
wife, trains, in the Lake Zurich 
and Harrington areas. 

Perkins, a Greenfield Wis. 
firefighter, was part of a sweep 
from runners who escaped from 
Wisconsin to fare well in Lake 
County. Allen Douglas, of Elk 
Mound, Wis., won the men's 
marathon In 2:36:23, a 15 second 
margin over John McCormlck of 
Chicago. 

"One of my goals 
was to finish in the 
top 10 and qualify for 
the Mexico City 



race, 



—Beth Orilnos 



. ■ ■ 



.-,-• \-m 










Allen Douglas gets ready to cross the finish line at the Lake County 
Races. Douglas, of Elk Mound, Wis., won the men's marathon In 
2:36:23. More than 4,600 participated In various marathons, the 1 OK 
and relays.— Photo by Steve Peterson 



Perkins left running for a few 
years and recovered from an in- 
jury before winning Sunday's 
race by a comfortable margin. 

"It started off cool, but this 
was a fine day," Perkins said. 

Perkins said the fire depart- 
ment has been behind her efforts 
in the costly world of ultra 
marathoning. 

Douglass, age 32, is a dairy 
farmer in Elk Mound, Wis. His 
time was his best in five years. 

"Running is just my hobby, he 
said. . 

"I thought I was dreaming," 
he said of the finish. 

David Polin of Buffalo Grove 
finished third in the marathon at 
2:38.16. Ray Pirrung was fourth at 
2:42:04; Tom Doming, who had 
the lead as late as the 20- mile 
marker, had a 2:43:28. Mark Avery 
of Decatur had a time of 2:46:46 
for sixth; Jeff Curtin of Applcton, 
Wis. was seventh in 2:47:42; Dave 
Engclkc of High wood was eighth 
at 2:48:28. 

Darryl Johnson of Inglesidc 




Donna Perkins receives roses after winning the women's marathon 
at the Lake County Races. Perkins, a firefighter, won In 3:03:38. The 
marathon concluded at Ravinla Park.— Photo by Steve Peterson 



was the top area male finisher in 
ninth at 2:51:06. 

Pamela Stcigcrwald of Kildcer 
was the top area female in the 
marathon with 3:22:25, for sixth 
place.. 

Todd Wells of Chicago won 
the 10K run in 30:48, topping Carl 
Nuccio of Rockford's 31:39. 

Several relay teams were 
among the 4,600 runners. Win- 
ners include: the Kenyan All-stars 
in the open-co-cd team in 
2:49.34; Desk Top Recycling II in 
the men's corporate division in 
3:14:56. 

Arpcrccn won the team coed 
race in 3:09:37. 



THE 

KENTUCKY 

DERBY 

Hear the Call 
and the Color 



•<. 



Moore Marathon 
announces winners 

The men and women's results 
of the Lake County Races Moore 
Marathon, held May. 1, arc as fol- 
lows: 

1. Allen Douglas, 32, Elk 
Mound, Wis., 2:36:23; 2. Matt 
McCormick, 29, Chicago, 2:36:48; 
3. David Polin, 33, Buffalo Grove, 
2:38:16; 4. Ray Pirrung, 45, 
2:42:04; 5. Tom Deming, 40, 
Charlotte, N.C., 2:43:28; 7. Mark 
Avery, 37, Decatur, 2:46:46; 8. Jeff 
Curtin, 29, Applcton, Wis., 
2:47:42;. 8. Dave Engclkc, 37, 
Highwood, 2:48:28; 9. Darryl 
Johnson, 45, Inglesidc, 2:51:06; 
10. Patrick Gorman, 35, 
Banington, 2:51:19. 

1. Donna Perkins, 35, St. 
Francis, Wis., 3:03:38; 2. Trish 
Beach, Elmhurst, 3:07:19; 3. 
Nancy Rollins, 47, Evanston, 
3:13:10; 4. Debbi Erickson- 
Beyers, 38, Glenview, 3:14:55; 5. 
Mari Jo Hecker, 29, Elmhurst, 
3:19:55; 6. Pamela Stcigcrwald, 
34, Kildecr, 3:22:25; 7. Heidi 
Schmidt, 37, Elgin, 3:23:24; 8. 
Beth Onines, 41, Lake Zurich, 
3:26:23; 9. Robin Hauscr, 27, Lake. 
Forest, 3:29:04; 10. lanllle 
Zirngible, 41, Dorchester, Wis., 




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ABC Radio Sports 

Presents 

The 120th running 

of the. 

Kentucky Derby 

LIVE from 

Churchill Downs 

with 

Don Chevrier 

Fred Manfra 

and race caller 

Dave Johnson. 

Tomorrow 
4 p.m. 

NEWS 1220 




•THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY* 








Max A, 1994 UknlANd NewspApcus SPOUTS 



lQS 



Sanders, Murphy, Kessel gain Disk 4 




honors 




Tom Murphy 

North Suburban Conference 
basketball took a collective bow 
as four conference coaches re-, 
ceived Dist 4 Coach-of-thc-Ycar 
honors. 



LlbcrtyvlUc girls basketball 
coach Tom Murphy, LI IS boys 
coach Max Sanders, Mundclcln 
boys coach Dennis Kessel and 
Zion- Benton boys coach Don 
Kloth were honored in Normal 
on Saturday. 

"It was Just a real honor get- 
ting the award," Murphy, winner 
in 1984, said. 

"We play some pretty good 
basketball in .this part of the 
state," he said. 

The Wildcats were 26-4 and 
reached the. supcrscctional for 
die second straight year. Several 
Lady Wildcat standouts will con- 
tinue sports careers in college, 
Kelly Karl leads the group; but 
Sarah Weiss, Lindscy Celba, Erica 
Chung and Mandy McClcan arc 
expected to play sports in college. 

Murphy's team's claim to 
fame was defeating Stevenson, 
thus winning the sectional title 



and denying the No, 1 ranked 
team in the state a spot in the 
Sweet Sixteen. 

Murphy has a 357-89 record 
in 16 years. His teams have won 
13 regional titles; 5 sectional ti- 
tles; and 2 Elite Eight appear- 
ances. 

Julie Virta and Tammy Scars 
arc on AAU teams, working on 
their skills for next year. 

For Sanders, the banquet was 
a chance to renew* old friend- 
ships. 

"I met Rich Rapp, a collegiate 
teammate of mine at Bra'dlcy. He 
was from Centralis and was a 6-7 
forward," Sanders recalled. 

"It Is always nice to be singled 
out by your peers. It Is more 
meaningful than coming from 
the media or fans," Sanders said. 

The Wildcats were 22-9, de- 
■ fcating Mundelcin for the sec- 
tional title and Weber for the su- 



per sectional crown. The 
Wildcats lost to Rockford Boylan 
in the Class AA quarterfinals. 

"It is nice to sec the other guys 
starting to get the recognition, 
too. The NSC has had a team in 
the Elite Eight three of the last 
four years," Sanders said. 

The most -famous Wildcat, 
Matt Hcldman, will play at the 
University of Illinois next year. 
Jamie Carruthers drew some in- 
terest for basketball, but opted 
for a baseball scholarship to In- 
diana State. 

Sanders guided the Wildcats 
to a fourth-place finish in 1991 
and has a career record of 242- 
161. 

Kessel directed the Mustangs 
to a NSC title, a second straight 
regional title and achieved his 
350th career win this past season. 

Mundelein was 16-0 NSC, 24- 
. 2 overall. 



Max Sanders 

Mundelein standout Kyle 
Kessel will play baseball and bas- 
ketball at Texas A&M. 

District Four covers north- 
west Cook and Lake counties. 



Kenwood announces winners of 'Stand-Aside Scramble' opening event 



Rcnwood Golf Course has 
announced the winners of its 
Opening Stand-Aside Scramble, 
held April 23 and 24 at the course 
in Round Lake Beach. 
Saturday Scramble results 

Ash division— first, 68^0, 
Hunsbcrgcr, Dan Hunsbcrgcr, 
Joe Shields and Gene Davis; sec- 
ond, 70, Dan Eltman, Dan Kozor, 
Jeff Ploch and Blaine Bronson. 
Oak division— first, tic with 66, 
Homer Jenkins, Dave Gauss, 
Mike Hahn and Jill Koch; and 
Greg Schneider, Wayne Fisher, 
Lee Martinck and Frank Saucr. 



Red Bud division— first, 69, 

Larry Kavanaugh, Joe Johnson, 

Don Jazo and Tom Kavanaugh; 

second, 74, Shirle Jeschawitz, Joe 

Jcschawitz, John Jezcrio and Bill 

Miller. 

Sunday Scramble results 

Wax division— first, 71, Ben 
Bonalcs, Arnotdo Rivera, Alex 
Rosario and Robert Rivera; sec- 
ond, tie with 74, Al Henderson, 
Don Nelson, Mike Spcno and 
John Bajda; and Dennis Kchrcr, 
Phil Donahue, Doug 

Wcstcrmann and Suan 
liigginbottom. Painted divi- 



sion—first, 61, Craig Krcssner, 
Kathy Kressner, Brad Krcssner 
and Mike Fanslow; second, 64, 
Steve Zavodny, Art Lautz, John 
Sweeney and George Zana; third, 
tic with 65, Larry Thomas, Kelly 
Wcndricks, Joe Thomas and Dale 
Thomas; and Dennis Whiton, Jay 
Howes, Mike Howes and Mike 
Plunkctt 

Snapping division— first, tie 
with 68, Jim Kowalczyk, Joe 
Jeschawitz, Shirle Jeschawitz and 
Jim Mielke; Mark Mctzger, Rick 
Metzger, Vince Zupkas and Frank 
Louis; and Jeff Ploch, Blaine 



Branson, Adam Rubin and Doyle 
Keysow. Box division— first, 69, 

Wayne Fisher, Lee Martinck, 
Steve Polechcck and Eric 
Martinek; second, 70, Dave 
Sponholtz, Pat Coon, Ed Caraher 
and Dean Jo'nson; third, tie with 
71, Steve Fcnchcl, Doug Parks, 
Jim Rubins and Terry Schmutte; 
and Noel Thomas, Bruce Domck, 
Jim Walleck and Doug Rowley. 

Saturday's low scoring teams, 
tied at 66, were the foursome of 
Homer Jenkins, Dave Gauss, 
Mike Hahn and Jill Koch, and the 
team of Greg Schneider, Wayne 



Fisher, Lee Martinek and Frank 
Saucr. 

Sunday's low scoring group, 
with a 61 was the .team of Craig 
Kressner, Kathy Kressner, Brad 
Krcssner and Mike Fanslow. 

The event is the first of a scries 
of scrambles, alternate shots and 
other special events, all open to 
the public. 

For a listing of special events, 
phone the Rcnwood Golf Shop at 
546-8242. Rcnwood is owned and 
operated by the Round Lake Area 
Park District 






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Unofficial final results of the 

23rd Annual Lake County 

Tavern Owner's Tournament 

are as follows: 
the top 10 out of 79 teams 
1st place guaranteed $1000 

(with handicap) 

1. The Opera 3484 

2. Dave's Amusement 3458 

3. Vandals 3422 

4. Deep End 3422 

5. Stroll's 3391 
6. 4P« & A Handy 3342 

7. Dave's Boys 3341 

8. Doug's Auto Service 3317 

9. Lsst Minute 3312 

10. Wail's Resort 3282 

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Best of Luck Bowlers! 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

YOUR COMMUNITY 
YOUR NEWSPAPER 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Gravslake, IL 60030 

(708) 223-8161 







•\ t 1*» ^P. **. 



SPORTS UkdANd NcwspApERS M*y 6 r 1994 



Three Bears anno 




Chicago Bears wide receiver 
Tom Waddle and linebacker Jim 
Schwantz and former Chicago 
Dear linebacker Jim Morrisscy 
were on hand at Countryside 
Golf Course to announce the 



Celebrity Golf Outing, which will 
benefit the Lake County Forest 
Preserve Youth Conservation 
Corps. 

Last year, 200 golfers and 24 
Chicago Bears took to the links in 




Chicago Boars wide receiver Tom Waddle announces the Youth 
Conservation Corp's Celebrity Golf Outing while former Chicago 
Bear linebacker Jim Morrlssey looks on. Linebacker Jim Schwantz, 
not pictured, was also on hand at Countryside Golf Course In 
Mundeleln to announce the Celebrity Golf Outing June 15. The 
Lake County Forest Preserve hopes to raise $75,000 In order to 
employ 1 1 teen-agers this summer.— Photo by Gene Gabry 

Sox to honor members of Negro League 



The Chicago White Sox will 
honor members of the Negro 
League in a prc-game, on-field 
ceremony May 7 at 1 p.m. 

Former players of the Negro 
League to be honored include Joe 
Barnes, Sherwood Brewer, Lester 



Ixickctt, Al Spearman and James 
McCurrinc. 

'I*hcy will be recognized for 
their contributions to the league. 
After the ceremony, the Sox will 
take the field to take on the 
Kansas City Royals. 



Look for Your Dream Home 

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the YCC . benefit. This year, the 
Celebrity Golf Outing Is sched- 
uled for June 15 at the 36-holc 
course in Mundclcin. 

The YCC Is a summer jobs 
program for teen-agers that aims 
to develop environmental aware- 
ness and a strong work ethic. 
They also complete a conserva- 
tion project. 

The YCC has collected 
$25,000 from individual donors 
and corporations so far this year 
and hope to raise $75,000. this 
year to employ 1 1 teen-agers this 
summer. 

"The program gives young 
people the opportunity to do 



something constructive, make a 
few bucks while doing it and 
learn something," said Terry 
Simmons, chairman of the YCC 
golf outing. 

Simmons is also from Abbott 
Labs, one of the major corporate 
contributors to the program. 
Simmons said Abbott con- 
tributes to the YCC as an invest- 
ment in the community, In youth 
and in future employees. 

"The YCC brings out the best 
in these young men and 
females," said Simmons. 

Waddle, whose unbcllcveablc 
grabs have amazed Bears fans in 
recent years, said it was an honor 



and^a pleasure to be involved in 
the program. . 

"Nothing is more important 
than giving our youth opportuni- 
ties to find employment," said 
Waddle, "and do what we can to 
make our Forest Preserve a much 
prettier, nicer place to be." 

Waddle was also asked what 
he will gain personally out of his 
participation in the golf outing. 

He said he felt responsible "as 
an athlete to try to do what you 
can during your short career to 
try to give back... Plenty of people 
have been gracious enough to 
help mc."-KEVIN HANRAHAN 



« 



Read It & Reap 



w 



Contest! 



YOU may be chosen as the recipient of $50, 
compliments of Lakeland Newspapers. Each 
week, we will be publishing the id. numbers of . 
two readers in lakeland Newspapers. If your 
reader Ld. number appears, you have until 
Wednesday of the following week to call lakeland 
Newspapers and claim your prize. (Winners will 
have two weeks after tie contact date to pick up 
their prize.) Current subscribers may find their 
i.d. number on the mailing label affixed to die 
front page of the paper, like this.... 



TUf WI1&S WINKERS US 







Reader 
LD. 

Number 

To subscribe and 

become eligible for uiis 
long-running contest, call 
the Lakelanc [Newspaper cir- 
culation department at 

223-8161. 



US0249 

Brad Usyak 
Grayslake 

BE0575 

Darren Beatty 

Lindenhurst 



contest Rules: 1. Two winners are picked randomly from 13 of the.Laketand Newspapers through a random computer 
search. 2. Winners will be notified by reader Identification numbers in the newspaper each week. 3. To claim prize, winners 
must contact Lakeland Newspapers' Circulation Department by the following Wednesday of publication. 12:00 noon, and 
schedule pick-up of prize. 4. Winners must show proof of identification at the Lakeland Newspapers front office to claim prize. 
5. Winners must pick up prize within 2 weeks of notification. 6. Subscription must be paid in full to be eligible to claim prize. 
7. All winners must agree to have their names and pictures to be used for promotional purposes. 8. Contest will begin January 
21, 1994, and will end December 30, 1994. 9. Contest Is void where prohibited by law. 10. Employees of Lakeland 
Newspapers and their relatives are not eligible to win prizes. 11. Decisions of judges are final. 12. This contest is not designed 
to be a lottery system. Unclaimed prizes wil not be re-assigned. 






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MAy A, 1994 U!<eIan<1 Newspapers SPORTS 



C>2 






, clc nets sweep wilh school home rui 



't 



Mother Nature may have 
caused an shortened week for the 
College of Lake County baseball 
team, but the Lancers' bats took 
advantage of the chances they 
had. 

The Lancers set school 
records In a 27-6 and 12-2 sweep 
ofMalcomXatCLC. 

Bob Olson led the way with 3 
homeruns, 8-for-10 on the day, 
boosting his average to .401. 

"1 knew he was a good hitter, 
but I did not expect him to get the 
ball into the air. I wish we had 
played the other games. Me is in a 
zone," CLC Coach Gene Hanson 
said of Olson, a Warren Township 



High grad. 

CLC set school records with 
13 homers, 9 In the first, 4 in the 
second game. Seven round trip- 
pers In one game was the previ- 
ous best 

Heath Cummings joined Ol- 
son in the hot bat category. He 
had 9 RBIs. Catcher Scott Carticr 
gave CLC its first grand-slam 
home run. 

"He has slowly Improved. He 
has a tendency to swing at bad 
pitches," Hanson said. 

Hanson said CLC's home run 
hitting power is a surprise. With 
the post-season tourney and a 
game with DuPage left, CLC had 



53 home runs, 10 shy of the 
school record. 

CLC lost chances to build on 
that total when games with 
Marquette were rain and- or 
snowed out. Also canceled was a 
tourney with N4C league schools. 

CLC improved to 31-10. 



"Williamson is more of a 
power pitcher. Scott is a lefty and 
mixes it up more," Hanson said. 

Both pitchers will be needed 



for the post-season, which begins 
May 6 at Kankakee. "Wc need 
pitching to step up now," 
Hanson said. 



Field meet benefits special needs 



On Sunday, May 0, the 



"Thirty wins is a target. I thought Therapeutic Recreation Section of 



wc would have a few less losses," 
Hanson said. 

Josh Williamson ran his 
record to 4-0 with the first-game 
win. Scott Lucadcllo, from Anti- 
och, improved to 4-1 with the 
second game win. Lucadcllo 
struck out 10 and walked only 
one. 



the Illinois Parks and Recreation 
Association will' host "The 1994 
Illinois Classic Track and Field 
Meet" This meet is open to indi- 
viduals, ages 6 through adult who 
have a physical disability, includ- 
ing but not limited to, cerebral 
palsy, spinal cord injury, spina 
bifida, muscular dystrophy, ostco- 



genesis imperfecta and stroke. 

The Illinois Classic will be held 
at the Oak Park-River Forest High 
School from 9:30 am. to 4:30 p.m. 
This meet is sanctioned by 
Wheelchair Sports, USA and the 
United States Cerebral Patsy 
Athletic Association. For further 
information, contact Ron 
Bcrgquist at 392-2848. or Tom 
McPikc at 312-294-4768. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



THIS WEEK 

Celebrity golf 

Players from the Chicago 
Bears announce YdC golf 
outing 
PACEC30 

Vikings update 

Semi-pro footbal team 
holds mini camp 
PAGE C27 

L.C.Races ...... 

4,600 participate in 
marathon, 10K and other 
relays 
PAGE C20 



Midwest Tae kwon do artists compete at Antioch 



Approximately 400 tae kwon do 
martial artists from Illinois, 
Wisconsin, Michigan and 
Minnesota converged at Antioch 
Community High School April 30 
to compete in the Midwest Cup 
Championships 

Junior and adult participants 
demonstrated their tae kwon do 
skills and were judged according 
to form and fighting. 

John Sicber, an instructor at 
the U.S. Tae kwon do Academy in 
Antioch, said the event was a 
"practice tournament before the 
big show." 

State championships will be 
held in June, while the 14th annu- 
al Junior Olympic National 
Championships arc slated for 
July 14-16 at the Rosemont 
Horizon. 

Kurt Lang of K.H. Kim's Tae 
kwon do in Lake Zurich also said 
the tournament in Antioch was 



great opportunity to compete 
before the state championships 
and Junior Olympics, 

Both contingents from 
Antioch and Lake Zurich per- 
formed well at the competition. 

-Eighteen juniors from the 
Antioch studio took first, second 
or third in fighting or forms. They 
included Bobby Bird, Anthony 
and Michelle Dcfaico, Matt, 
Mitchell and Michelle Elliot, John 
Sicber II, Timmy Walker, Nick 
Galick, Dana and Stephen 
Glewicz, Greg Hllgcnberg, Robin 
McGuirc, Darrcl Morgan, Ryan 
Perks, Garrett Schultz, Brian 
Wood and Buck Pardee. 

Another five adults took first, 
second or third trophies in form 
or fighting. They included Hector 
Gonzalez, Dan Hcisclmann, 
Darrcl Young, Steve Bchrcndt 
and Mike Wysocki. 

Sec TAE KWON DO page C27 




Shan© Sutton of Lyndon, III.. Jumps over a row of youths in his 
attempt to split a board. After landing, ho throws a turn-around 
kick to the orhe? boatd. Four hundred youth and adults from across 
the Midwest participated In the Midwest Cup Championships at 
Antioch High School, Many iarea participants earned medals^ 
Photo by Bill Carey , 



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